13.5 Chemistry

Students are strongly advised to successfully complete the Chemistry sequence appropriate to their program (Chemistry 1200/1001 or 1050/1001 or 1050/1051) on the Campus they first attend prior to transfer to another Campus.

Chemistry courses are designated by CHEM.

CHEM 1001 General Chemistry II

focuses on rates of reaction, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and introduction to organic chemistry.

AR:
attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
CR:
CHEM 1051
LC:
4 including tutorials
LH:
3
PR:
CHEM 1200 or CHEM 1050; Science 1807 and Science 1808
CHEM 1200 General Chemistry I

builds on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include is atomic structure and bonding, stoichiometry, reactions in aqueous solutions, gases, energetics of chemical reactions, the periodic table, chemical bonding and molecular geometry, intermolecular forces.

AR:
attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
CR:
CHEM 1050
LC:
4
LH:
3
PR:
grade of at least 60% in CHEM 1810 or CHEM 1010, or high school CHEM 3202 with a grade of at least 65% or high school CHEM 2202 with a grade of at least 80%; Science 1807 and Science 1808
CHEM 1810 Elements of Chemistry

focuses on matter, scientific measurement, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical compounds and elementary bonding theory, the mole, chemical reactions, the chemistry of selected elements, gases, solutions, stoichiometry. This course is specifically intended for those who have no background in chemistry.

AR:
attendance in the laboratory component (on Campus version) or completion of the practical component (online version) of this course is required. Failure to do so may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
CR:
CHEM 1010; must not have previously received credit for, or be currently registered in CHEM 1200 or CHEM 1050
LC:
4
LH:
3
PR:
Science 1807 and Science 1808
UL:
may not be used as one of the Chemistry courses required for a B.Sc. Degree with a Major in Environmental Science at Grenfell Campus. Only 6 science credit hours will be awarded for a major or honours in Chemistry from the following course groups: CHEM 1010/1050/1051, or CHEM 1810/1200/1001.
CHEM 1900 Chemistry in Everyday Life

is a course that shows the relevance of chemistry in our daily lives. Following an introduction to atomic structure and chemical bonding, the course will focus on some of the following topics: organic chemistry and fuels; redox processes and batteries; acids, bases, and household cleaners; phases and detergents; the chemical components of foods; polymers and plastics; toiletries, and pharmaceuticals.

UL:
may not be used as one of the required courses towards a Minor, Major, or Honours in any science degree program
CHEM 2210 Introductory Inorganic Chemistry

focuses on fundamental concepts in the chemistry of s, p, and d block elements and their compounds. Emphasis will be placed on periodic trends in physical and chemical properties, molecular symmetry, molecular orbital diagrams, simple crystal structures, Lewis acid/base theory, and introductory coordination chemistry.

AR:
attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
LH:
3
PR:
Science 1807 and Science 1808; minimum 60% in CHEM 1051 or a minimum 60% in either CHEM 1001 or the former 1031
CHEM 2301 Thermodynamics and Kinetics

builds upon knowledge of physical chemistry from first year. It covers the three laws of thermodynamics for ideal and real systems as well as chemical kinetics. Topics in thermodynamics include the thermodynamics of ideal and real gases, phases, and solutions, the Maxwell relations, equilibria between phases, and in electrolyte solutions. The integrated rate laws for simple and complex mechanisms, and the temperature dependence of reaction rates in terms of kinetic molecular theory are some of the topics discussed in the kinetics section of the course.

AR:
attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
CR:
the former CHEM 2300
LH:
3
PR:
Science 1807 and Science 1808; minimum 60% in CHEM 1051, or a minimum 60% in either CHEM 1001 or the former CHEM 1031; Mathematics 1001. Physics 1051 or Physics 1021 is recommended.
CHEM 2302 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

examines the quantum mechanics of simple systems such as the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, linear rotor, and hydrogen-like atoms. Topics also include orbital quantum numbers, spin, many electron atoms, an introduction to quantum mechanical methods, the electronic structures of molecules, bonding, and symmetry. Furthermore, electronic, rotational, and vibrational spectroscopy will be discussed as well as modern applications of spectroscopy and lasers. AR: attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.

CO:
Mathematics 2000 is recommended
CR:
the former CHEM 3301
LH:
3
PR:
Science 1807 and Science 1808; minimum 60% in CHEM 1051, or a minimum 60% in either CHEM 1001 or the former CHEM 1031; Mathematics 1001 and Physics 1051 or Physics 1021
CHEM 2400 Introductory Organic Chemistry I

is a course on bonding involving carbon; conformations and sterochemistry; introduction to functional groups and nomenclature; properties, syntheses and reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.

AR:

attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.

CO:

CHEM 1001 or CHEM 1051

CR:

CHEM 2440

LH:

3

PR:

a minimum 60% in CHEM 1050 or CHEM 1200; or CHEM 1010 and the former CHEM 1011 with a grade of at least 80% in each; or the former CHEM 1011 with a grade of at least 85%; or a minimum of 60% in the former CHEM 1031; Science 1807 and Science 1808

CHEM 2401 Introductory Organic Chemistry II

is an introduction to the interpretation of mass, infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectra; properties, syntheses and reactions of simple aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds, ketones, aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives; aldol and related reactions.

AR:

attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.

CR:

CHEM 2440

LH:

3

PR:

CHEM 2400; a minimum of 60% in CHEM 1001 or CHEM 1051; Science 1807 and Science 1808

CHEM 2440 Organic Chemistry for Biologists

is an introduction to the principles of organic chemistry with an emphasis on material relevant to biological molecules. The laboratory will introduce techniques and illustrate concepts covered in the course.

AR:
attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
CR:
CHEM 2400, CHEM 2401
LH:
3
PR:
CHEM 1001 or CHEM 1051; Science 1807 and Science 1808
CHEM 3261 Atmospheric Chemistry

provides a comprehensive study of the chemistry of the Earth’s atmosphere. Beginning with an overview of planetary atmospheres, we follow the evolution of the Earth’s atmosphere until today. Atmospheric chemical processes are interpreted from the perspectives of chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, molecular orbital theory, and molecular spectroscopy. The mechanisms of stratospheric reactions are studied in the context of the ozone layer, while those of the troposphere are linked to the so-called ‘greenhouse effect’ and aspects of pollution. The very different upper-atmosphere chemistry is also studied.

EQ:

Environmental Science 3261

PR:

CHEM 2210 and CHEM 2301 or permission of the instructor and Program Chair

CHEM 3262 Environmental Biogeochemistry

introduces students to the biological, chemical, and geological processes underpinning carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, iron, manganese, and phosphorus cycling. Using real-world examples, this course provides an in-depth examination of the interplay between the different processes governing biogeochemical cycles within soils/sediments and along the aquatic continuum. Topics may also include early earth biogeochemistry, methods in biogeochemistry, and the role of spatial/ temporal variability and climate change on earth’s biogeochemical cycles.

EQ:

Earth Sciences 3562, Environmental Science 3262

PR:

A minimum of 48 credit hours including: Biology 1002 or Biology 2120 or Biochemistry 2201; Chemistry 1001 or 1051; Earth Sciences 1000; or permission of the instructor

AR = Attendance requirement as noted.

CH = Credit hours: unless otherwise noted, a course normally has a credit value of 3 credit hours.

CO = Co-requisite(s): course(s) listed must be taken concurrently with or successfully completed prior to the course being described.

CR = Credit restricted: The course being described and the course(s) listed are closely related but not equivalent.  Credit is limited to one of these courses.  Normally, these courses cannot be substituted, one for the other, to satisfy program requirements.

EQ = Equivalent: the course being described and the course(s) listed are equal for credit determination.  Credit is limited to one of these courses.  These courses can be substituted, one for the other, to satisfy program requirements.

LC = Lecture hours per week: lecture hours are 3 per week unless otherwise noted.

LH = Laboratory hours per week.

OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars.

PR = Prerequisite(s): course(s) listed must be successfully completed prior to commencing the course being described.

UL = Usage limitation(s) as noted.