Geography

Geography is the study of how humans interact with their environment; Geographers study the interactions of people and the places they live, on all scales, from their city to their planet.

Geographers are the planners, map-makers, researchers, and decision makers behind planning for climate change, wildlife conservation, sustainable resource development, responsible mining, and many more of society's most pressing needs and challenges. Visit the Department of Geography website.

Geography Electives

Below is a list of all Geography electives that anyone can register for, because they have no or just 1 prerequisite. For a complete list of our Geography courses, see the university calendar


Geographies of Global Change
(GEOG 1050)

Provides perspectives on the major geographical challenges and changes facing the contemporary globe, including: climate and environmental change, sustainability, human development, economic globalization, cultural change, and population and migration. Using the integrative skills of geographical analysis, the course prepares students for advanced study in geography and citizenship in the modern world. All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

Note: credit may not be obtained for GEOG 1050 and any one of the former GEOG 1000, the former GEOG 1001, the former GEOG 1010, the former GEOG 1011


Cultural Geography
(GEOG 2001)

An introduction to the study of culture in geography, emphasizing both the history of the field from classic studies of landscapes to contemporary scholarship and themes of recent importance. It explores the politics of cultural production and consumption; critical spaces of cultural production and consumption from around the world, including cities, landscapes, texts, media, performance, and identity; and concepts of everyday life, materiality, and space/place. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

Prerequisite: GEOG 1050, or the former GEOG 1001, or the former GEOG 1011


Physical Geography: The Global Perspective
(GEOG 2012)

A study of form, process, and change in natural systems at and near the surface of Earth, viewed as human environment. Emphasis is on global and regional scales in the systematic study of climate, water, landforms and vegetation. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS and Quantitative Reasoning Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

Prerequisite: GEOG 1050, or the former GEOG 1001, or the former GEOG 1011, or students following a major in Environmental Physics

Note: This course has 3 laboratory hours per week


Canada's Natural Environments and Landscapes
(GEOG 2105)

Examines the characteristics and development of the natural environments and landscapes of each of the major regions of Canada. The diversity of natural environments is illustrated through discussion of the climatic, hydrological, biogeographical, and geomorphic processes responsible for shaping the land. The impact of both gradual and rapid (catastrophic) changes on local, national, and global scales will be emphasized. This course is complementary to GEOG 3405; students are encouraged to take both.

Note: Same as the former GEOG 3100


Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
(GEOG 2195)

An introduction to the fields of cartography, remote sensing, and geographic information systems (GIS). Geographic information collection, representation and analysis methods are the topics for the course. An emphasis is given to applications of maps and satellite images. All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.


Issues in Economic Geography
(GEOG 2302)

Covers issues and ideas in economic geography. The development of local, regional and global economies will be related to economic, cultural and resource factors at international scales. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS and Quantitative Reasoning Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

Prerequisite: GEOG 1050, or the former GEOG 1001, or the former GEOG 1011, or permission of the instructor


Natural Resources
(GEOG 2425)

An introduction to the concepts of natural resources, environment and conservation: the nature and distribution of natural resources; methods of use, allocation and development of natural resources and the role of various physical, social, economic, political and technological factors influencing decision-making about resources.

Prerequisite: GEOG 1050, or the former GEOG 1001, or the former GEOG 1011

Note: Same as the former GEOG 3325


Regional Geography of Labrador
(GEOG 2495)

A holistic study of the Geography of Labrador, including the terrain, geology, Quaternary history, climate, vegetation, and fauna; the cultural geography of Labrador, including Innu, Inuit, NunatuKavut, and Settler people and communities; economic activities in Labrador, and the interaction of the Labrador economy within Newfoundland, Canada, and globally; the management of physical and human resources; and the geographic techniques used to investigate and understand Labrador's unique Geography.

Note: Same as the former GEOG 3495


Science, Technology, and Society
(GEOG 3015)

Explores the relationships among science, technology, and society (STS). It is premised on the idea that science and technology affect our social, cultural, economic, and political lives. Equally, scientific research and technology development are shaped by their social, cultural, economic, and political contexts. This course draws upon the fields of anthropology, sociology, geography, history, and cultural studies, as STS is an interdisciplinary field.

Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that all 2000-level core courses be successfully completed before registering for this course.

Note: Same as Sociology 3015 


Community and Regional Planning and Development
(GEOG 3350)

Introduces students to regional planning and development theories, techniques and approaches. Understanding of networks of development actors at community and regional scales, methods of delineating regions, links between theory and practice in planning and development. Focus on Canadian experiences and a sustainable development perspective.

Prerequisite: GEOG 2302 or permission of the instructor


Globalization of Food
(GEOG 3420)

Examines the increasingly globalized nature of food consumption, production and trade. The course examines the positive and negative effects of globalization on the food system before exploring the proliferation of alternative food networks. These alternative food networks aim to re-localize and re-embed the food system and include organic food, fair trade, self-provisioning, and animal welfare amongst many others. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

Note: It is strongly recommended that all 2000-level core courses be successfully completed before registering for this course; Same as the former GEOG 3907 


Geography of the Seas
(GEOG 3150)

An introductory course in marine science and management treating the world’s oceans as a global geographic unit. The course covers basic physical, geological and biological marine science and applications of basic science to management issues facing the oceans today. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

Prerequisite: GEOG 2102 or GEOG 2425, or permission of instructor


International Migration
(GEOG 3620)

Examines global population movements from a critical geographic perspective. This course applies a spatial lens to key topics surrounding migration, including labour and development; borders and immigration control, refugees and the politics of asylum; and citizenship, belonging, and place making. Students will develop skills in information seeking, critical judgment, and effective communication for a broad audience, in addition to gaining the knowledge base to navigate contemporary migration debates. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

Prerequisite: GEOG 2001 or permission of the instructor


Special Topics in Geography
(GEOG 3900-3909, excluding 3907)

Will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Head of the Department


Cultural Resource Management
(GEOG 4015)

A study of cultural resource management: the definition and recognition of cultural resources, the application of policy in managing cultural resources, and the identification and consideration of contemporary issues in cultural resource management.

Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that GEOG 3222 and 3228 be successfully completed before registration in this course

Note: This course requires three hours of seminar per weekSame as Archaeology 4015, Folklore 4015


Discard Studies
(GEOG 4030)

Covers the cultural, economic, and resource aspects of waste, pollution, and externalities. Topics include, but are not limited to: social justice, colonialism, toxicity, scale, spatialities and temporalities, economic development, and infrastructures as they relate to systems of waste. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are emphasized.


Natural Hazards: People and Environments
(GEOG 4060)

Considers case studies involving select biological and medical; climatological; geophysical; hydrological; and meteorological hazards. There are no hazards without people. The emphasis is not only in how and where particular natural hazards develop, from a physical / exposure viewpoint, but also in the implications for risk management, emergency response, planning, and community sustainability. Aspects of social and community sensitivity and vulnerability will be emphasized.

Note: Same as the former GEOG 4908


Engaging the Environmental Humanities
(GEOG 4500)

Explores the role of the environmental humanities in a setting beyond the traditionally defined class-room. While the initial weeks focus on providing students with the tool-kit and theoretical framework for engaging the environmental humanities, the course is mainly driven by projects designed and executed by students in collaboration with community partners.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Diploma in Environmental Humanities or permission of instructor

Note: same as History 4500