Fall 2022 course offerings

Below, you will find a list of all HSS graduate course offerings for fall semester 2022. Browse by department:


 

Anthropology graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Fieldwork & Interpretation of Culture (ANTH 6300)

Course description forthcoming.


History of Anthropology (ANTH 6410)

Course description forthcoming.


 

Archaeology graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Theory and Method in Archaaeology & Prehistory (ARCH 6000)

A seminar-based course focussing on the development of theory and method in archaeological research. This course will assist students in selecting a theoretical orientation in which they can engage with their research.

CR: the former ARCH 6411.


When Worlds Meet: Nature/Culture and Ontological Conflicts (ARCH 6685)

The nature/culture divide is one of the most basic assumptions grounding modern science and politics. As such, in the past and still in the present, this ontological divide has been key on how we (so-called moderns) conceive the world and our relations to other humans as well as non-humans. In recent years, a number of developments have problematized this modern ontological divide as well as a whole series of binary oppositions spanning from it, such as subject/object, representation/represented, mind/body and so on. The emphases of the discussions have been on as diverse topics as the concrete issues where the problems with the nature/culture divide become evident such as human/non-human relations; the ‘imbroglios’ of nature-culture like climate change that are produced by technology; shifting notions of personhood; the status of ‘things,’ substance and property; the reconceptualization of society and nature as seamless socionatural orders; and the problems that all this poses for political and scientific representation to mention a few. In this course we will explore: a) the developments that are putting into question the modern ontological divide between nature and culture , b) the implications that these developments have for scientific and political practices and, c) emerging attempts at understanding ontological multiplicity and conflicts as a central feature of the present moment.


 

Classics graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Seminar in Roman History and Society: Ancient Water (CLAS 6003)

This seminar is intended to explore the place of water in the lives of ancient circum-Mediterranean cultures: the relationships between societies and the physical world that they constructed to facilitate and reinforce the activities important to the ways of life of the ancient North African, Mesopotamian, Etruscan, Greek, and Roman cultures. Topics may include the following: practical and symbolic meaning of water, water in myth and religion, rain-water collection and diversion, wells and cisterns, seepage galleries, canals and dams, tunnels, open-channel aqueducts, pipes and pipelines, drainage and sewers, engineering training and the practice of hydraulic engineering, funding of projects and mobilization of resources, irrigation works, literary and epigraphical sources for hydraulic engineering, public bathing complexes, visual representation of hydraulic installations, fluid mechanics theory.

The instructor will lead several introductory discussions (first few weeks of term), and the students will concurrently research suggested topics for presentation and discussion. All students will be asked to select presentation topics from a list provided, or in consultation with the instructor, and to sign up for their presentation date. The first three presentations will deal with primary sources for water in antiquity. These topics are set. The following presentations will consider the patterns of innovation, any contributions from science, and the social penetration of particular aspects of water. After the oral presentations, the students will work their research into written versions.

The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the major accomplishments of ancient hydraulic engineering and technology and its relationship with the culture and economy of the pertinent societies. Students will be expected to learn how to evaluate written and material evidence for understanding ancient cultures and their technologies and to speak and write convincingly about their ideas.
There is no formal prerequisite for this course, but I strongly suggest that you register for this course only if you have previously taken at least one other course with the Department of Classics where you were required to analyze critically a text and to write a research paper.


Seminar in Roman Literature and Culture (CLAS 6004)

Course description forthcoming.


Special Topics in Latin Readings: Post Classical Latin (CLAS 6250)

Course description forthcoming.


Greek Literature: Oratory (CLAS 6300)

Course description forthcoming.


 

Economics graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Advanced Micro Theory (ECON 6000)

Course description forthcoming.


Advanced Macro Theory (ECON 6001)

Course description forthcoming.


Econometrics (ECON 6002)

Course description forthcoming.


Graduate Seminar (ECON 6009)

Course description forthcoming.


Labour Market Economics (ECON 6030)

Course description forthcoming.


 

English graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Trends in Contemporary Critical Theory (ENGL 7003)

All too often, people think of “theory” as disconnected from action. Not so for this class! Together, we’ll be reading foundational texts of contemporary theory and working collaboratively to discuss praxis: a term used since Aristotle, for whom praxis is one of the three basic activities of human beings (the others being theoria or theory, and poiēsis, or skilful manufacture). Readings will include Marx and Engels’ The Communist Manifesto and Legacy Russell’s Glitch Feminism: A Manifesto.


Creative Writings: Nature Writing (ENGL 7003)

In English 7214 we will be taking up Anna Tsing’s challenge by helping students establish an attentive nature writing practice through a combination of extended periods of time outdoors collecting field notes and finding points of contact; an intense writing schedule (daily lyric, and fortnightly nonfiction/essay pieces); peer critiques; and readings (including contemporary models of the genre and theoretical work). Work done during the semester will be collected into a final portfolio of writing, optionally in the form of a “story map." 

This final portfolio of creative work, a presentation on at least one of the course readings, participation in peer critiques and group work will form the basis for evaluation in the course.


Genre Studies: Women Travellers Writing North (ENGL 7353)

This course will examine a number of travel narratives written by unusually intrepid women: Aritha van Herk, Josephine Peary, Elizabeth Taylor, Edith Watson, and Mary Schaeffer. Though oriented northward, these women described their remote destinations as "exotic geographies" (Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism). In Orientalism Said suggests that travel literature contributed to the formation of imperial attitudes and helped empires rule distant lands and unruly people: "From travelers' tales ... colonies were created and ethnocentric perspectives secured" (117). Central to Said's argument is the notion that stories about remote regions of the world enabled writers to assert their own sense of superiority and to privilege their own cultures and histories. This course investigates why women travelers were attracted to northern regions of the world and what attitudes they expressed about the people who inhabited those regions. We will begin by reading “Ellesmere, Woman as Island,” an excerpt from Aritha van Herk’s Places Far From Ellesmere.


Period Studies: Global Renaissance (ENGL 7353)

The Renaissance was as much about making new connections with civilizations in various parts of the world through exploration and trade as it was a matter of Europeans connecting with the Classical Graeco-Roman past. In this course we will study how the literature of early modern England both romanticized the supposed adventure of overseas encounters and tallied the costs for those on the losing end of global expansion. The works we will consider tell stories of piracy and conquest, detail a fascination with the perceived exoticism of foreign cultures, reflect early modern English conceptions of race and empire, and reveal the threat that England felt from both the Ottomans and Catholic Europe.


 

Folklore graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Survey of Folklore Genres (FOLK 6010)

Course description forthcoming.


Field & Research Methods (FOLK 6020)

Course description forthcoming.


Folklore Theories (FOLK 6030)

Course description forthcoming.


Ethnography of Communications (FOLK 6260)

Course description forthcoming.


Ethnography of Belief (FOLK 6300)

Course description forthcoming.


Folklore And Gender (FOLK 6730)

Course description forthcoming.


Ethnography of Belief (FOLK 6300)

Course description forthcoming.


 

French graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Literary Methods and Theory I (FREN 6009)

Course description forthcoming.


Francophone Literature: Theory and Practice (FREN 6800)

See course description for FREN 6800.


 

Gender Studies graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Feminist Theory (GNDR 6000)

Course description forthcoming.


Feminist Epistemologies and Methodologies (GNDR 6100)

Course description forthcoming.


 

Geography graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Developmental and Geographical Thought I (GEOG 6000)

Course description forthcoming.


Problems in Fisheries Geography (GEOG 6300)

Course description forthcoming.


Cultural Geography (GEOG 6500)

Course description forthcoming.


 

History graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 

Note:
To increase the range of options available to students, the Department of History encourages graduate students to take one of our 4th year seminars (course number 4xxx) as a graduate seminar credit (a 6xxx course). This requires the instructor's permission and will normally include additional readings, assignments, and expectations compared to the senior undergraduates in the seminar. These courses vary from semester to semester so please consult the Department of History's undergraduate course listing for the relevant semester. 


Advanced Studies in Labour History and Working Class (HIST 6075)

This course explores the history of working people and the development of organized labour since the 19th century. Focused especially on Canadian case studies, the course provides insight into empirical and theoretical aspects of working-class history. Students will have an opportunity to examine and evaluate a variety of approaches to the study of this subject.


Research Special Topics: Advanced Studies in Cultural History (HIST 6150)

This seminar considers the various theoretical frameworks adopted by cultural historians. This is not a comprehensive survey but rather an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between “the cultural (or literary) turn” in historical analysis and cultural studies. What do we mean by culture and how has our understanding changed over time? What does it mean to practice cultural history compared to other practices of analysis? What are the methodological insights and limitations? How have historians empirically upheld their claims about culture? What are the major debates amongst scholars within the field of cultural history?


Theory and Method (HIST 6190)

History 6190 is a graduate level seminar on theory and method in history. We will consider two main questions: “What is history?” and “How do you do it?” The course is not a survey. Instead, we will consider some of the key intellectual foundations for the discipline of history as it has been practiced by professional historians, and we will examine a selection of approaches that historians have deployed in recent decades in their efforts to understand the past. Particular attention will be paid to how different scholars use sources, how they structure their narratives, how they conceptualize their studies, and the advantages and limitations of the methodologies and frames of analysis different scholars have embraced.


PhD Seminar I (HIST 7000)

This course will be taken as HIST 6190 with doctoral students completing modified assignments as required and determined by the supervisor and instructor assigned to teach HIST 6190. Students that have completed HIST 6190 (or its equivalent) will instead complete HIST 7000 as a directed readings course or in combination with another 6000 level course being offered in the department.


PhD Seminar II (HIST 7001)

This course will be combined with another 6000 level course, with Ph.D. students completing modified assignments as required and determined by the supervisor and instructor assigned to teach the course, or offered as a directed readings course.


 

Linguistics graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Selected Topics in Phonology (LING 6204)

Recent advances in theoretical phonology and their application to the analysis of particular languages, with special attention to morphophonology. Emphasis will be placed on argumentation strategies and substantive evidence within phonology.


Sociolinguistics (LING 6210)

Studies the detailed patterns of variation found in any given speech community, and factors which co-vary with them, and the various theoretical models proposed to account for such variability. Students acquire a thorough grounding in the methods and theory underlying current approaches to the relationship between language and society. As their major assignment, students will complete a carefully restricted sociolinguistic project.


Experimental Phonetics (LING 6700)

Some empirical methods of studying the different stages of the “speech chain” which links speaker to hearer, with special emphasis on the acoustic and perceptual stages. The source-plus-filter theory of speech production. A survey of the range of natural articulations and their acoustic effects. Some competing theories of speech perception. Competing correlates for distinctive features (from different stages of the speech chain). The student will be required to undertake a major project or term paper which will require an original analysis or reanalysis of data. Extensive lab work will also be required


Seminar in Research Methods (LING 7000)

This course is required of all M.A. and Ph.D. students, and is normally taken in the first semester of the first year. A major focus of the course is to provide students with practice in the kinds of research and writing commonly undertaken in Linguistics. The course also covers steps commonly involved in presenting research at conferences. Other topics likely to be covered are applying for funding, ethical issues in Linguistics, building a professional profile, and university teaching and research groups. Students will be introduced to various types of software which assist in some of the tasks explored in the course. A major course component will be to research and write a “mock proposal” for individually selected research projects. Proposals may form the basis of work required by the individual’s program.


Analytical Issues in Linguistics (LING 7001)

The goal of this course is to allow students to become familiar with linguistic argumentation through close examination of primary texts focussed on a selected theme or set of themes of relevance to current linguistic issues.


 

Philosophy graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructorsee our upcoming courses database. 


Graduate Research Seminar (PHIL 6000)

Course description forthcoming.


Seminar in Modern Philosophy (PHIL 6012)

Detailed study of one philosopher in the modern period.


Philosophy of Natural Science (PHIL 6015)

Course description forthcoming.


The (Critical) Phenomenology of Spirit: Hegel and Contemporary Social Theory (PHIL 6046)

Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit is an account of the myriad factors by which human experience is constituted. Experience takes the form of encounter with what is other (consciousness); awareness of ourselves as experiencers (self-consciousness); reliance upon the perspectives others have upon us (recognition); the complex interplay among these elements that plants history and culture at the heart of the self (ethical life); answerability to what appears to us as absolute but can only ever be actualized in a finite way (unhappy consciousness, conscience, art, religion); the inhabitation of knowledge as a singular being with the multiple aspects of the form of experience in hand (absolute knowing). Beyond compelling in its own right, this comprehensive grasp of the human condition has much to offer to contemporary critical efforts to grapple with the problems of our time. Thus this course will study Hegel, while putting him in dialogue with critics of racism, sexism, liberalism, capitalism, and colonialism such as Frantz Fanon, Iris Marion Young, Charles W. Mills, Glen Sean Coulthard, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Saba Mahmood, in the expectation of finding rich opportunities for cross-pollination.


 

Political Science graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructorsee our upcoming courses database. 


Political Science Approaches (POSC 6000)

Course description forthcoming.


Empirical Methods in Political Science (POSC 6010)

Course description forthcoming.


Research Design and Professional Development (POSC 602 A/B)

Course description forthcoming.


Co-operative Internship (POSC 6030)

Course description forthcoming.


Contemporary Democratic Theory (POSC 6190)

Course description forthcoming.


International Politics (POSC 6200)

Course description forthcoming.


Democracy & Phantom Public (POSC 6390)

Course description forthcoming.


Local Politics (POSC 6720)

Course description forthcoming.


 

Sociology graduate courses: Fall 2022

For additional course infomation such as slot, room number, and instructor, see our upcoming courses database. 


Advanced Quantitative Methods (SOCI 6040)

Compulsory for all incoming graduate students of Sociology. Designed to enhance students’ understanding of the theory and practice of quantitative social research, with a focus on the practical experience of conducting quantitative research and the use of relevant quantitative data analysis software.


Social Theory (SOCI 6150)

Compulsory for all incoming graduate students of Sociology. Provides advanced instruction in selected topics in Social Theory.


Sociology Graduate Seminar (SOCI 6880)

Compulsory for all incoming graduate students of Sociology. Focuses on the development of professional skills required of all graduate students. These include research, writing, and presentation skills; instruction around publishing and knowledge mobilization; responding to faculty and other scholarly research; and “surviving” grad school.