Research Week 2021

Design featuring blue and purple colours and the words Thank you. Research Week in white colour and 2021 in a gold colour.

As Research Week 2021 closes, big thanks to everyone who participated in talks, organized an event and helped promote our activities.


Events will be added as details are submitted.

Research Week 2021 takes place Nov. 22-26 at Memorial University

You're invited to a variety of events as we celebrate Research Week from Nov. 22-26.

Those planning an event should send the title of the session, date, time, virtual log-in instructions or room/building location and a short description to vprfeedback@mun.ca no later than Monday, Nov. 8, in order to have details added to the events calendar below.

#researchweek2021

Monday, Nov. 22
Tuesday, Nov. 23
Wednesday, Nov. 24
Thursday, Nov. 25
Friday, Nov. 26

Monday, Nov. 22
Faculty of Science
Quick Pitch: Research for Undergraduates
All weekThis event runs throughout Research Week. The Faculty of Science is promoting research opportunities for Science undergraduates and potential future graduate students. Faculty members will submit short video ‘pitches’ from their research groups about their work, allowing students to virtually explore different science topics being researched at Memorial. The videos will be available online for viewing throughout Research Week. 
The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science's Annual Research DayAll weekThe Engineering Research Office and Office of Graduate Studies are jointly organizing a virtual Annual Research Day to highlight the groundbreaking research led by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (FEAS). Pre-recorded presentations will be made available to the public for the duration of Research Week 2021 on the FEAS website.
HSS Showcase Poster DisplayAll weekThroughout Research Week, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences will be displaying posters from research projects that are part of our HSS Showcase. While you’re out and about, please stop by the Founders' Gallery (the main foyer of the Arts and Administration Building, St. John's Campus) and read through the amazing variety of research being done in the faculty. The display also contains a how-to guide explaining how Humanities and Social Sciences researchers can add their projects to the HSS Showcase.
Fossil or Not-a-FossilAll weekFor Research Week 2021, The Johnson Geo Centre, in collaboration with the Faculty of Science’s Department of Earth Sciences, is challenging the public to play ‘Fossil or Not-a-Fossil,’ and help search for early animal life in the walls and breakwaters around Quidi Vidi Lake. Recently, Ediacaran fossils have been spotted in the armour-stone that protects the pathways around Quidi Vidi. Anyone who finds an interesting structure they think might be a fossil is invited to upload an image of themselves with it and tagging the Johnson Geo Centre’s Facebook or Instagram page, or its Twitter feed, including a caption of where it was found. More details are available here online
Health Accord NL -- Reimagining Health and Health Care in NLNov. 22-24Virtual Town Halls Hosted by: Health Accord NL

Health Accord NL, the provincial Task Force on Health, is working to reimagine health and health care in Newfoundland and Labrador. Its objective is to use evidence, strategies, and public engagement to create a plan for a 10-year Health Accord that will improve health in Newfoundland and Labrador, and to do so within the fiscal envelope of the province. Join the Co-Chairs of Health Accord NL, Dr. Pat Parfrey and Sister Elizabeth Davis, for one of five virtual public town halls and help shape the final report which will lead us into the next 10 years as we work together towards a healthier Newfoundland and Labrador.

The full schedule and registration details are available here
The Cut of It: Women’s Experiences with Breast CancerAvailable online to view for freeA film about women’s experiences with breast cancer in Newfoundland & Labrador, The Cut of It, is available free public viewing.

Access the film here online and read the research report here

Written by Meghan Greeley and produced by White Rooster Theatre, The Cut of It is based on the patient-oriented research project, Understanding the Experiences of Breast Cancer Patients through Digital Stories. This three-year study was guided by patient-oriented research, CIHR. Using digital stories, a group of breast cancer patients shared their personal breast cancer treatment experiences. The film features a number of participants from the original study, as well as actors Mary Walsh (This Hour Has 22 Minutes) and Mayko Nguyen (Rookie Blue). This research was conducted by: Dr. Kathleen Sitter, CRC (Tier 2) Multisensory Storytelling in Research and Knowledge Translation, associate professor, Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary and adjunct professor, Community Health and Humanities, Memorial University and Dr. Natalie Beausoleil, professor of Social Science and Health, Community Health & Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University. The project was made possible by a Patient-Oriented Research grant awarded by the Newfoundland and Labrador Support for People and Patient-Oriented Research Trials Unit, NL Support.
Research Collaborations with Radiology: A Wealth of Opportunity Bridging Disciplines and Domains11am-noonJoin us as a panelist of radiologists from the Faculty of Medicine with seasoned research skills discuss their current and prospective projects and research interests. Learn why it is important to include a radiologist on your study team when dealing with diagnostic/ interventional imaging data. Furthermore, see the broad spectrum of domains and disciplines that can prosper through collaboration with radiology including pure sciences and the tech sector. To join this session via Webex, please see here.  
SSHRC Insight Development Grant Overview & Panel11am-1230pmJoin HSS Grant Facilitation Officers for a hybrid session on SSHRC’s Insight Development Grant competition. We’ll provide an overview of the program as well as host panelists who have held or currently hold IDG funding. We’ll not only walk through the aims and objectives of the program and how to think about planning applications for the upcoming 2022 competition but also hear from panelists about how they laid out their research and planned their own applications. Researchers, especially those early in their careers (pre-tenure, contractual, and postdoctoral), from all faculties are welcome.

This event will take place online and in the Nexus Centre, room SN-4022 in the Science Building, St. John's Campus. Please e-mail hssresearchgrants@mun.ca for Webex details for online participation.
Faculty of Science
Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition
11am-1pmDuring this event, research students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance. This event will be held in room C-2039 in the Chemistry-Physics Building, St. John's Campus. More details are available here.
Alternative forms of knowledge mobilization11:30am-12:30pmJoin us for a discussion about alternative forms of knowledge mobilization for your research. This is a great opportunity to learn about different methods for communicating your research such as podcasts and blogging. Our panel will get into an in-depth discussion of methods they have used to communicate their research, with time for some question and answer. Location: room FC-3019, Grenfell Campus. To attend online, e-mail Lucas Knill for details: lknill@grenfell.mun.ca.
Offshore Construction Challenges in Very Shallow Arctic Regions12-1pmThe Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is hosting this lunch and learn with Dr. Hodjat Shiri. Log-in instructions for this virtual session are available here. More information about this session is available here
ACENET: Introductory Programming for Humanities & Social Science1230-330pmThis is an introductory workshop for researchers/students who are interested in programming basics for Humanities and Social Sciences applications. No prior experience with programming is required. Applications include digital data organization and preparation in the humanities, and Internet data collection from platforms such as Twitter. This session is entitled Python for Humanities. More details, including how to register, available here online.
The NLCAHR Research Exchange Group on Autism presents “Parenting on the Spectrum: The Intersection of Disability, Parenting, and Governance” with PhD Candidate Andrew Dixon1230pmIn research about autistic adults, there is work being done on sexual health, joining the workforce, and independent living. There is, however, very little research that addresses the next phase of life: parenting. Comprehensive sexual health education states that education requires more than information about intercourse, STIs, and pregnancy - it must also include support for both unwanted and wanted pregnancy and information that supports parenting. What literature is available about the intersection of parenting and disability typically involves child protection interventions. However, relying on foster care services, grandparents, or other extended family members to fill the gap is a poor substitute for preparedness. Based on cues from the National Research Center for Parents with Disabilities (NRCPD) in the United States, Andrew Dixon is undertaking an Interdisciplinary PhD project that will investigate supports for autistic parents. Andrew Dixon, BA, M.Phil., is an Interdisciplinary PhD Candidate (Anthropology, Bioethics, and Sociology) with a focus on Disability Studies. To join this session via Zoom, please see here. Meeting ID: 812 8015 5506 Passcode: 063465
Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research (CFER), Fisheries and Marine Institute presents Lessons from the Placentia Bay Coastal Restoration Project1-2pmCFER’s Marsha Clarke and Dr. Arnault Lebris will outline the work done to restore healthy coastal habitats in Placentia Bay over the last five years (2017 to present) through the Coastal Restoration Fund. From underwater gardening to a war on the invasive European green crab, this project has involved extensive team work that has tested minds and bodies (and boats!). Learn how the research team has worked to use their collective knowledge, along with lots of creative thinking, in order to restore healthy habitats for young ocean life. This session will be hosted via MS Teams. Registration details are available here.

Marsha Clarke is a Fisheries Research Technologist. She holds a Bachelor of Agricultural Science degree from Dalhousie University, with a major in Aquaculture. She completed her Master of Science in Aquaculture at Memorial University in 2008, where she studied cod eggs and larvae at the Ocean Sciences Centre. Since graduating, she has been working as a research technologist – working first at DFO from 2008 - 2010, and having now been with the Marine Institute since 2011. She has experience working on projects related to aquaculture, seafood processing, biotechnology, and fisheries ecosystems.

Dr. Arnault Lebris is a research scientist with interests in understanding and quantifying processes that drive the dynamics of marine fish and shellfish populations. His past and present work has focused on evaluating how climate variability and change affects the productivity of living marine resources, and how fish migration affects the sustainable management of fisheries resources. Originally from the Brittany region in France, Arnault first came to Newfoundland in 2009 to pursue his doctoral studies in fisheries ecology at Memorial University of Newfoundland.
Reconciliation and Relationships in Research130-330pmTo request log-in instructions for this virtual session, please email Indigenousresearch@mun.ca.

Violet Ford, associate vice-president (Indigenous Research), with the Office of the Vice-President (Research), is hosting this session. 

Ivan White, student affairs officer – Indigenous affairs, Grenfell Campus, will moderate a conversation with panelists:

Catharyn Andersen, vice-president (Indigenous);
Dr. Ashlee Cunsolo, interim dean, School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies, Labrador Institute;
Dr. Stephen Decker, assistant professor, School of Science and the Environment, Grenfell Campus; and
Kelly Anne Butler, Indigenous education specialist, Office of Indigenous Affairs

More details about this session are available here. All are welcome to attend.
Book launch for Mining Country: A History of Canada’s Mines and Miners 7-830pmJoin authors Drs. John Sandlos and Arn Keeling, Professors of History and Geography at Memorial, as they launch their new book, Mining Country: A History of Canada’s Mines and Miners. Published by Lorimer Press, this book is the culmination of 14 years of research on the history of mining, especially in Northern Canada. Illustrated with over 150 archival photographs, Mining Country is the first comprehensive history of mining places and mining people in Canada. The book also focuses on the environmental costs of mining, and the interactions between the industry and Indigenous communities. A limited number of copies of the book will be available for sale at this event.

This event is taking place at The Taproom, Quidi Vidi Brewery, 35 Barrows Road, St. John’s. 
Tuesday, Nov. 23
Engaging Ideas9-11amYou're invited to Engaging Ideas, the Faculty of Business Administration’s research and industry engagement series. This series aims to bridge the gap between industry and research and provide a forum to discuss practical uses and real-world implications of the exciting research being conducted in the business faculty and at Memorial. The topic of this session is Exploring Co-operatives, and presentations from researchers, students and community practitioners will offer insight into the societal role and economic impact of co-operatives in Newfoundland and Labrador and other remote jurisdictions. Full event details can be found here. Registrants may attend in person or online, and vax passes will be required for in-person attendance. To register, email businessevents@mun.ca.
Translating your research to funders and the broader community11am-noonThe Technology Transfer and Commercialization Office is hosting this session. Communicating the value of your research requires understanding the customer, their problems, and how they evaluate new ideas and solutions. Join our facilitator, Julie Collins, to learn about using lean innovation techniques to communicate the value of your research by understanding the unmet needs of the funder and those impacted by your research. Julie joins us from Georgia in the United States, where she is a leading player in the field of entrepreneurial coaching and a faculty member for the United States’ National Science Foundation's (NSF’s) Innovation Corps (I-Corps) program. This interactive workshop will give you new tools and questions to evaluate the value of your research to the broader community and the funder. Faculty, graduate students and post-docs from all fields are encouraged to attend. This is a virtual session. Eventbrite log-in details are available here.
Propelling the Blue Economy: Connecting Our Oceans,
Our People, Our Future
NoonYou are invited to launch of the Marine Institute's three-day virtual symposium, which takes place during Research Week. This event brings together scientists, researchers, government representatives, industry stakeholders, NGOs and Indigenous and coastal communities to exchange and share their experiences and ideas on all aspects of The Ocean Decade. The symposium will provide an interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and solutions to assist in the development of a common framework that will contribute to the development of a sustainable blue economy for Canada and the world. This event runs Nov. 23, 24 and 25. To register and view the full schedule of events and speakers, please see here.
Launch of Vice-President (Research) discussion12-1pmDr. Neil Bose, vice-president (research), invites the university community to participate in an exciting new initiative with the launch of this discussion. This event focuses on basic and applied research regarding mental health. Are you interested in building collaborations with like-minded researchers in health, natural, social sciences and humanities? Do you want to determine how your work intersects with others at Memorial? Would you like to discover collaborative funding opportunities? More details, including registration instructions, are available online.
Sustainable energy and environmental remediation in Canada: Challenges and future research directions12-1pmThe Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is hosting this lunch and learn with Dr. Sohrab Zendehboudi. Log-in instructions for this virtual session are available here. More information about this session is available here.
ACENET: Introductory Programming for Humanities & Social Science1230-330pmIntroductory workshop for researchers/students who are interested in programming basics for Humanities and Social Sciences applications.
No prior experience with programming is required. Applications include digital data organization and preparation in the humanities, and internet data collection from platforms such as Twitter. This session is entitled Internet data collection with Python and APIs. More details, including how to register, available here online.
MUNalum 101: Coffee1-2pmCoffee is definitely more than just a drink. Many of us wouldn’t have gotten through university without it! Join Memorial biochemist Dr. Scott Harding (B.Sc.’98, M.Sc.’03) for a discussion on the history, chemistry and nutrition of one of the world’s favourite beverages. Following Dr. Harding’s presentation, alumnus Rob Collins (B.Sc.’87, BA’88) will share his top tips from over 20 years in the café business (Hava Java Coffee House and Espresso Bar) and demonstrate how to make better coffee at home. Register for this free virtual event here.
Students Doing Systematic Reviews: What You Need to Know1-2pmEvery student doing a systematic review consults with a librarian primarily for expert searching and process guidance. Good communication between the supervisor, student, and librarian is essential in ensuring efficiency and clarity of scope and expectations. In this session, we will talk about how to put students in the best position for success at every stage of the review process. This session will be of interest if you are a faculty member whose students are doing systematic reviews, or if you are a student who is working on a systematic review.

Presenter:
Lindsay Alcock, Head, Public Services, Health Sciences Library

Register here for this online session. Learn more about Memorial Libraries events during Research Week here.
The Learning Health System and Patient Engagement -- Why and How?1-2pmYou are invited to join NL SUPPORT and Quality of Care NL for a Research Week webinar to learn more about three main areas of focus in our work:

• NL SUPPORT offers knowledge brokering, expertise and funding to create a culture of Patient-Oriented Research (POR) in Newfoundland and Labrador. POR refers to a continuum of research that engages patients as partners, focusses on patient-identified priorities and improves patient outcomes.
• Quality of Care NL focuses on evaluation of the health system in order to facilitate change and ensure the right treatment gets to the right patient at the right time.
• Together, NL SUPPORT and Quality of Care NL are working to promote a Learning Health System in the province aimed at merging health care delivery with research, data science and quality improvement processes, continuously informed by practice and seeking to influence practice in turn.

Registration details are available here
Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research (CFER), Fisheries and Marine Institute presents Establishing an Arctic Char Counting Facility on Labrador’s Fraser River2-3pmArctic char supports a valuable commercial and domestic fishery that significantly impacts food-security and family economies along the Labrador coast. During 2021, a fish counting structure was established and tested on Fraser River as Phase 1 of a multi-year project to investigate population ecology of the local Arctic char stock and provide critical data on abundance necessary to inform recommendations and management decisions. This research involves a collaboration between Torngat Joint Fisheries Board through the Torngat Secretariat and the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University, with support from the Nunatsiavut Government and Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. This presentation will overview the research initiative and describe activities during the 2021 field season including establishment of the remote field camp and installation and testing of an Adaptive Remote Imaging Sonar (ARIS) system. This session will be hosted via MS Teams. Registration details are available here.

Presenter/moderator: Dr. Sherrylynn Rowe – Research Scientist and MUN Project Lead, Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research, Marine Institute. Craig Taylor – Fisheries Research Program Manager and Project Lead, Torngat Wildlife, Plants & Fisheries Secretariat. Adam Templeton – Fisheries Technologist and MUN Technical/Field Lead, Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research, Marine Institute.

Research Week Panel Discussion: Research and Perspectives on Education in the Circumpolar North230pmPlease note: this session is moved to Thursday, Nov. 25, at 2:30 p.m. Panel discussion featuring: Jennifer Godfrey Anderson (Memorial University), Sylvia Moore (Memorial University), Sean Asiqłuq Topkok (University of Alaska Fairbanks), Hannah Paniyavluk Loon (Iñupiaq Elder), Anne-Mette Bjøru (The Arctic University of Norway), Anne Randi Solbakken (The Arctic University of Norway), Kathy Snow (University of Prince Edward Island), Darlene Nuqinagaq (CELN Instructor), Nunia Anoee (University of Prince Edward Island), Erin Morozoff (University of Prince Edward Island), Alexander McAuley (University of Prince Edward Island), Ron MacDonald (University of Prince Edward Island), Jonna Kangas (University of Helsinki, Finland), Heidi Harju-Luukkainen (University of Jyväskylä, Finland Nord University, Norway), Pigga Keskitalo )University of Lapland, Finland), Erika Sarivaara (University of Lapland, Finland), Kalpana Vijayavarathan (University of the Faroe Islands), Sylvia Moore (Memorial University), Elizabeth Yeoman (Retired Professor Memorial University), Katie Flood (Graduate Student and Research Assistant, Memorial University), Breanne Card (Memorial University), Anne Burke (Memorial University), Ola Andersen (Newfoundland and Labrador English School District), Amanda Nicole Gulla, (Lehman College/City University of New York).

Peoples of the Arctic have experienced rapid and often traumatic social change, and now environmental change. Former Chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, Sheila Watt Cloutier (2010), writes that character is built by the Arctic environment and maintains that education has a key role to play in responding to the impacts of climate change being witnessed across the north. This presentation is based on a special issue of Memorial University’s education journal The Morning Watch, and offers a look at education across the Arctic with voices of teacher educators from Finland, Sweden, Norway, Faroe Islands, Alaska, Labrador (Canada), and Nunavut (Canada). The authors from across these northern regions will share their research, centering the significance of place-based pedagogies in learning and mental well-being, the importance of teacher education in preparing teachers for their role with northern children, and the challenge of integrating traditional Indigenous knowledges with the demands of globalization. At the heart of all of the papers is relationships—the interrelationships between people and the land, culture and identity, and educators and students.
The NLCAHR Research Exchange Group on Arts & Health presents “Random Acts at Memorial University: student engagement and music-making” with PhD Candidate Julia Halfyard3pmThis presentation, intended for those who conduct research and practice in community engagement programming, will showcase the “Random Acts at Memorial” music-engagement program through Memorial University’s Student Life department. In this session, Julia Halfyard (Coordinator of New Student Experiences at Memorial and PhD Candidate, Faculty of Education) will talk about the role of music engagement in enhancing a sense of place and belonging on campus. The “Random Acts at Memorial” music engagement programming being piloted for undergraduate students deploys music and music-making opportunities as a form of cutting edge student engagement practice. The program is inspired by research evidence for the demonstrated power of music on mental health and social engagement in other community populations, and its creators are borrowing from these successes to create positive change in students' sense of belonging, well-being, healthy campus engagement, and community connection. To join this session via Zoom, please see here. Meeting ID: 830 0318 3995 Passcode: 828610
Researcher Gong Show4-530pmCome present as much of your research as possible, in a way that is understandable to a general audience (i.e. plain language), within a strict 5-minute time limit. Each presentation ends with a gong and is immediately followed by the next presenter (with no down time). The evening will be fun, informative, and chaotic! Location: room FC-2014, Grenfell Campus. To attend online, e-mail Lucas Knill for details: lknill@grenfell.mun.ca.
The Nexus Centre presents Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Creative Approaches to Research Dissemination7-9pmA roundtable discussion featuring scholar-practitioners from across the country who will their experiences with and insights around writing, thinking, and publishing beyond the peer-reviewed article. Roundtable participants include:

• Dr. Hannah McGregor, Publishing Program, Simon Fraser University
• Dr. Cheryl Thompson, School of Creative Industries, Ryerson University
• Dr. Carrianne Leung, Novelist and Lecturer, Ontario College of Art and Design
• Dr. Michelle Porter, Postdoctoral Fellow, Metis Studies, University of Toronto

For more details, please see the event poster.

This session will be hosted via Webex. Registration details are available here
Wednesday, Nov. 24
Expert Insights: Writing Impactful Papers -- An Editor's Perspective10-11amThe Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is hosting this session featuring:

Dr. Bruce Quinton, Associate Editor, Ships and Offshore Structures Journal;
Dr. Cheng Li, Associate Editor, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Transactions on Communications;
Dr. Greg Naterer, Editor-in-chief, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer;
Dr. Helen Zhang, Associate Editor, Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering; and
Dr. Salim Ahmed, Associate Editor, Control Engineering Practice

This session is being held via Webex. To join, please click here. More information is available here.
ACENET presents Computational Fluid Dynamics: An Overview of Popular Software Packages1030am-noonACENET is hosting this free virtual session. Computational Fluid Dynamics, or CFD, is the science of using numerical methods and computers to solve a set of partial differential equations to quantitatively predict fluid flow or heat transfer in an application. It is used in a variety of fields, from aero/hydrodynamics to energy, combustion, environmental flows, biomedical engineering and many more. Using CFD simulations significantly reduces the number of design prototypes required, saving considerable time and money in the design process – accounting for its rising importance in R&D. For example, when a boat builder designs a new vessel, it can use CFD simulations at each design iteration to test the performance of the vessel under different conditions before proceeding to the physical prototype stage. There are numerous CFD software packages, both commercial and open-source (free), the suitability of each based on the user’s knowledge, budget, and intended application. This presentation will provide an overview of some of the most popular CFD packages, their capabilities, and pros and cons, to help you choose the one that will work best for your company. Registration details, and more information, is available online.
Research Grant & Contract Services (RGCS) virtual coffee break11am-noonIn recognition of Research Week and all the contributions of the research community, RGCS is holding a virtual coffee break to reconnect with faculty research offices. There is no set agenda for the break but rather an opportunity for faculty grant facilitators and associate deans to drop-in and say hello to/chat with RGCS members. We look forward to you “dropping in” and saying hello. If you are interested, please email RGCS@mun.ca by Nov. 23 for the log-in instructions for this virtual meet-up.
Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research, Fisheries and Marine Institute presents Studying pelagic ecosystems in the Canadian Arctic and the Labrador Sea11am-noonIn the summer of 2021, scientists boarded the CCGS Amundsen on a mission to better understand the geology, oceanography, and ecology of the North Atlantic and Arctic. Join this session while we showcase the operations used to complete this mission and share video clips about the life as a new scientist on board the research cruise. Using the data collected during the voyage, we share how hydroacoustics and net sampling are important to better understand the ecology of northern pelagic ecosystems. Eugenie Jacobsen and Jennifer Herbig explain how their research relates to the work conducted onboard and highlight its importance in studying a changing Arctic Ocean. This event will be hosted via MS Teams. Registration details are available here.

Presenter/moderator: Eugenie Jacobsen (she/her) is a MSc student in Fisheries Science and Technology at the Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland in the Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research (CFER). Currently, she studies contaminants (mercury, methyl mercury, and organochloride pesticides) in
demersal and pelagic fish from the Labrador Sea and the Canadian Arctic with Dr. Maxime Geoffroy (CFER) and Dr. David Cote.

Jenny Herbig (she/her) is a PhD candidate in Fisheries Science and Technology at the Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland in the Center for Fisheries Ecosystems Research (CFER). Currently, she studies the ecology of Arctic Cod, Boreogadus saida, in the Canadian Arctic with Dr. Maxime Geoffroy and Dr. Jonathan Fisher.
HSS Research - Ask Us AnythingNoon-1pmCome meet HSS Associate Dean (Research) and HSS Grant Facilitation Officers and ask us anything -- from the names of our pets, to how you can prepare for that grant, to unveiling the mysteries behind submission procedures, or where to find funding for your research. All welcome!

This event will take place online and in room AA-5014, Arts and Administration Building, St. John's Campus. Please e-mail hssresearchgrants@mun.ca for Webex details for online participation.
School of Maritime Studies Graduate Research ShowcaseNoonJoin our School of Marine Studies graduate students who will showcase their latest research work. This event will be hosted via WebEx. Registration details are available here.
Faculty of Science
On the Menu: A lunch and learn series
1pmThis session will be presented by Niraj Shukla from Mitacs Newfoundland and Labrador. Jon Canning, grants co-ordinator, Research Grant and Contract Services (RGCS), will also be on hand to answer questions pertaining to RGCS' review of Mitacs research grant applications. This event will be held via Webex. Log-in instructions are available here.
Digging Deeper: Learning about Community Farm-Based Research at and with the Pye Centre2-3:30pm Atlantic / 2:30-4pm NewfoundlandThe Pye Centre for Northern Boreal Food Systems and the School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies are excited to be hosting researchers from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) for a virtual presentation and discussion about fostering innovation and resilience in Northern agriculture through community-farm based research on season extension techniques. In this session, AAFC researchers will be sharing results and information from trials they conducted on potatoes and beans this past summer. You’ll learn about what community farm-based research can look like, and how it can support and enhance local food systems and food sovereignty. A Q&A period will follow the presentation, where you will be able to ask questions, share ideas, and connect with the researchers leading this work.

This public session will be held virtually via Zoom. Please email pyecentre@mun.ca by Friday, Nov. 19 to register and receive the Zoom meeting information.
Preparing a Great Application for Grad School230-330pmAre you wondering how to put together a strong application to graduate programs at Memorial? Join the School of Graduate Studies for this free webinar to review the details of the application process. Its presenter will provide you with a step-by-step guide and useful tips to help with your application to Memorial. This session will be held via Webex. Click here to register.
GGSS Zine making Workshop230-330pmJoin the Grenfell Graduate Student Society to create an alternative format of presenting your research. The method of zine making combines various images, texts and messages to portray your research. Think collage! Bring along a large font synopsis printout of your research that you can use to cut and paste different ideas, and we'll provide the rest of the materials. This will be a fun workshop, so don't miss it. Location: Upper Airport Lounge (Upper AS atrium), Grenfell Campus.
The NLCAHR Research Exchange Group on Chronic Disease presents “Research on Chronic Disease in Newfoundland & Labrador” with Dr. Richard Buote3pmDr. Richard Buote will discuss three related research projects that look at chronic disease in Newfoundland & Labrador. Firstly, Dr. Buote's doctoral research examined factors associated with glycemic control, hospitalization, and mortality among NL residents with diabetes mellitus. Within this project, he examined the effect of family physician turnover on patients with diabetes in NL. Related to this project, he worked on a population-based, cross-sectional analysis of NL adults with diabetes mellitus. This descriptive analysis showed that diabetes is more prevalent in rural parts of the province and that rural residents have worse clinical outcomes than their urban counterparts. For many in this province, recommended targets for diabetes management were not being met. Finally, to inform the development of provincial strategies to meet these clear challenges in disease management, Dr. Buote and a team from Memorial University also looked at how chronic disease outcomes relate to the availability of primary healthcare services. They examined the availability of publicly funded primary healthcare programs/services delivered by the four provincial regional health authorities and found considerable variability in the range of services available to patients, with limited delivery of some programs and services. Richard Buote recently completed his PhD in Memorial University's Division of Community Health and Humanities and holds a Master's of Science in Kinesiology, also from Memorial University. To join this session via Zoom, please see here. Meeting ID: 853 5011 0230 Passcode: 806322
Speaking of Engineering Lecture7pmJoin Dr. Sarah Power, assistant professor, jointly-appointed to the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering) and the Faculty of Medicine (Discipline of Internal Medicine) for this talk. The title of the lecture is, “Have you ever wondered about how brain-machine interfaces can improve the lives of persons with disabilities?” This will be a virtual event via Webex. Log-in instructions are available here.
Thursday, Nov. 25
Virtual Nature Masterclass930am-noonWebinar focused on scientific writing. More details, including log-in instructions, will be shared with those selected to attend. 
Effects of COVID-19 on Health Care in NL10-1045amWebinar Hosted by: Quality of Care NL. The global COVID-19 pandemic has no doubt had a significant impact on health care around the world. Join Quality of Care NL as we share our analysis of some of those impacts right here in our province, such as the effects on prescribing patterns, surgery, incidence and management of ischemic stroke, virtual care, long-term care and more.

Registration details are available here.
Does My Study Require Ethics Approval? A Guide to Completing and Submitting an Ethics Application for HREB Review10-11amAre you ever unsure whether or not your study requires ethics approval? Are you in the process of submitting an ethics application for your study and don't know where to begin? Join the Health Research Ethics Authority (HREA) for a presentation that will help clarify when a study will require ethics approval and what will need to be included with an ethics application in order for it to be reviewed by the Health Research Ethics Board (HREB). In this session, we will provide a brief history of the HREA in Newfoundland and Labrador before delving into a discussion about what makes a study "health research", why health research needs ethics approval, and what elements of an application need to be submitted in order to be reviewed by the Health Research Ethics Board. This session will be presented by Barbara Mason (Ethics Officer, HREA) in collaboration with Sharon Newman (Ethics Director, HREA) and Rob Kean (Ethics Officer, HREA).

To join this session, please see here for the log-in instructions.
3-MInute Thesis- Grenfell Competition10-11amJoin Grenfell graduate students as they present their research in a brief 3-minute presentation. The format will follow the same style as other 3-minute thesis competitions around the world. This is an opportunity for graduate students to present their research to an audience and panel of judges before they present at the Memorial University Wide 3-Minute Thesis competition. Location: room FC 3019, Grenfell Campus. To attend online, email Lucas Knill for details: lknill@grenfell.mun.ca.
Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research, Fisheries and Marine Institute presents Recent and future advancements in assessment methodology for data-rich stocks1030-1130amDr. Noel Cadigan will discussing the developing role that integrated state-space statistical models have in fish stock assessments. This will be illustrated with the data-rich example of cod off the northeast coast of Newfoundland and Labrador. I also describe why spatial stock assessment models are increasingly considered for stock assessment and fisheries management advice. This session will be hosted via MS Teams. Registration details are available here.

Dr. Noel Cadigan is an associate professor at the Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research (CFER) of the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland. He is the Ocean Choice International Research Chair in Stock Assessment and Sustainable Harvest Advice for Northwest Atlantic Fisheries. Dr. Cadigan first started research on stock assessment methods in 1990 when he worked with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) at the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Center in Newfoundland. He received a PhD in statistics in 1999 at the University of Waterloo and then became a DFO research scientist and focused on the assessment of Atlantic cod and other groundfish stocks. In 2012, Dr. Cadigan accepted a research scientist position at CFER. Dr. Cadigan’s research deals with statistical methods for fish stock assessment and sustainable fisheries management. He has extensive experience in the assessment of Newfoundland fish stocks, and experience with many other Canadian, American, and European stocks. Recently his research has been focused on spatiotemporal models for complex fisheries data, and state-space/spatial stock assessment models.
Science Career Talk: Computer Science, Statistics and Data Science1030-1155amJoin the Faculty of Science as we welcome three alumni working in Computer Science and Data Science to share how they navigated their career path, job search, networking and more. A Q&A will follow the presentation so that you can make meaningful connections with scientists working in their field. More information about this session, the featured speakers and registration details are available online. This session is taking place in Innovation Hall, room IIC-2001, in the Bruneau Centre for Research and Innovation, St. John's Campus.
Navigating Scholarly Publishing - hosted by Memorial University Press1030am-noonJoin Memorial University Press Academic Editor Fiona Polack and Managing Editor Alison Carr for a discussion about scholarly publishing. Learn about the submission and peer review processes, tips for preparing a proposal and turning your thesis into a book, and what to expect once your book is accepted! This event will be hosted via Webex. Register for the event here or email mupress@mun.ca.
Transformation of Health Data Governance in Newfoundland and Labrador: How to Navigate Research and Evaluation Approval Processes11am-noonThis event is hosted by the Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Health Information, Eastern Health, Central Health, Western Health, and Labrador Grenfell Health.

For anyone who missed our presentation as part of Memorial's Research Week 2020, this session is a great overview of how to navigate approval processes to access health data for secondary use in NL. This session will focus on a collaboration by five health data custodians in NL: Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Health Information, Eastern Health, Central Health, Western Health, and Labrador Grenfell Health to streamline the data access process for the secondary use of health data. The goal of this collaboration is to increase the efficiency of requests by reducing the number of steps to access data, ensure data availability, further apply rigorous privacy standards, and help with ethics approval and more. In particular, the sessions will highlight some new key initiatives including the introduction of a data navigation service, the creation of a data custodian variable list, and new common application forms for research and evaluation projects. 

How to attend: The session will be held via Teams or please e-mail dataaccess@nlchi.nl.ca to receive the event link.
Caring for hospitalized patients with cognitive impairment11am-noonResearchers at the Newfoundland & Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research will share the findings of their latest Rapid Evidence Report, published in October by the Contextualized Health Research Synthesis Program: Alternatives to Constant Observation for Patients with Cognitive Impairment in Acute Care.

Log-in instructions for this virtual session are available here. Meeting ID: 815 8294 9706 Passcode: 035320. RSVP to Rochelle.baker@med.mun.ca to register for the session.

Health system decision makers in Newfoundland and Labrador want to find safe and effective ways to care for older adults in hospitals. Senior officials from the NL healthcare system asked researchers at NLCAHR to synthesize the best available evidence about how to care for older adults whose cognitive impairment may put them at increased risk of falls, injury, treatment non-compliance, and/or who may pose safety risks to others in the acute-care setting. Quite often, such patients are closely monitored, one-on-one, by a paid healthcare worker, an intervention known as constant observation. However, safety outcomes associated with constant observation are variable, and, not surprisingly, the practice has high associated costs. Health system decision makers wanted to find out about alternative strategies to care for elderly patients with cognitive impairment while maintaining a high standard of care at a sustainable cost. The research team for this study included CHRSP research officers Sarah Mallay and Pablo Navarro and CHRSP program director Dr. Stephen Bornstein. The team also relied on advice and guidance from Dr. Anne Bourbonnais, an expert in the care of older adults at the Université de Montréal.
HSS Showcase Drop-In11am-noonHave you seen the HSS Research Showcase yet? Are you faculty, a postdoc, or a graduate student researcher in the Humanities or Social Sciences? Would you like to enhance your research profile by adding your research project(s) to our Showcase? Come to the Digital Language Centre for a walk through of the Showcase and get assistance from our Grant Facilitation Officers on getting set up and/or revising Showcase entries.

This event takes place in the Digital Language Centre, room SN-4030, Science Building, St. John's Campus.
Integrity Of Buried Water Mains and Energy Pipelines12-1pmThe Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is hosting this lunch and learn with Dr. Ashutosh Sutra Dhar. Log-in instructions for this virtual session are available here. More information about the session is available here.
Faculty of Business Administration virtual Research Brown Bag session12-1pmThis session will focus on Mitacs programs and the application process. Libby Carew, Mitacs director of business development (N.L.) as well as the business faculty’s Dr. Tom Cooper and PhD candidate Ismael Golmohammadi will discuss Mitacs funding opportunities, applying as a principal investigator and the intern experience, respectively. To register, please email Mekaela Gulliver at mgulliver@mun.ca. A WebEx link will be provided upon registration.
ACENET presents Introductory Programming with MATLAB1230-4pmACENET is hosting this free hands-on beginner-level session, covering the fundamentals of MATLAB including data types, conditional statements, loops and functions, as well as program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Registration details for this virtual session, as well as more information, are available online.
School of Maritime Studies, Fisheries and Marine Institute presents I Sit All Day, Should I be Worried?1-2pmJoin us for a presentation by Dr. Diana De Carvalho, Associate Professor, Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine. This event will be held on WebEx. Meeting Number: 2634 904 4342. Password: MITalk
The Faculty of Medicine and partners present: Innovation in Health Care: Improving Emergency Department Wait Times1-230pmEmergency department wait times continue to rise year over year across Canada. The need for better efficiency has never been greater as many emergency departments are operating at or above capacity, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Join the Faculty of Medicine's Dr. Shabnam Asghari and Dr. Chris Patey, Ron Johnson (VP of Eastern Health), Dorothy Senior (Patient Advisor) and other members of the SurgeCon research team to learn more about what they are doing to improve the patient experience and work flow in emergency departments. Log-in instructions for this virtual session are available here. 
Dynamic Research and Interdisciplinary Excellence.

Co-hosted by the Faculty of Education, the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of Business Administration, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.
1-4pmGuest speaker, Chief Mi’sel Joe of the Miawpukek First Nation, will share the importance of examining any issue or research topic from multiple perspectives and disciplines. Chief Mi’sel Joe will have just come from being a co-applicant and organizer on the SSHRC-funded Two-Eared Listening for Deeper Understanding - Restorative Justice in Newfoundland and Labrador. Researchers from faculties across our campuses are invited to the session to not only learn from this event, where PI and co-applicants turned a SSHRC event on its head, but also have the chance to share their research with Memorial colleagues. Please RSVP to lcharlong@mun.ca or to your unit grant facilitation officer.
Research Week Panel Discussion: Research and Perspectives on Education in the Circumpolar North230pmPlease note: this session was moved from earlier this week.

Panel discussion featuring the special edition of The Morning Watch journal by Jennifer Godfrey Anderson (Memorial University), Sylvia Moore (Memorial University), Sean Asiqłuq Topkok (University of Alaska Fairbanks), Hannah Paniyavluk Loon (Iñupiaq Elder), Anne-Mette Bjøru (The Arctic University of Norway), Anne Randi Solbakken (The Arctic University of Norway), Kathy Snow (University of Prince Edward Island), Darlene Nuqinagaq (CELN Instructor), Nunia Anoee (University of Prince Edward Island), Erin Morozoff (University of Prince Edward Island), Alexander McAuley (University of Prince Edward Island), Ron MacDonald (University of Prince Edward Island), Jonna Kangas (University of Helsinki, Finland), Heidi Harju-Luukkainen (University of Jyväskylä, Finland Nord University, Norway), Pigga Keskitalo (University of Lapland, Finland), Erika Sarivaara (University of Lapland, Finland), Kalpana Vijayavarathan (University of the Faroe Islands), Sylvia Moore (Memorial University), Elizabeth Yeoman (Retired Professor Memorial University), Katie Flood (Graduate Student and Research Assistant, Memorial University), Breanne Card (Memorial University), Anne Burke (Memorial University), Ola Andersen (Newfoundland and Labrador English School District), Amanda Nicole Gulla, (Lehman College/City University of New York).

Peoples of the Arctic have experienced rapid and often traumatic social change, and now environmental change. Former Chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, Sheila Watt Cloutier (2010), writes that character is built by the Arctic environment and maintains that education has a key role to play in responding to the impacts of climate change being witnessed across the north. This presentation is based on a special issue of Memorial University’s education journal The Morning Watch, and offers a look at education across the Arctic with voices of teacher educators from Finland, Sweden, Norway, Faroe Islands, Alaska, Labrador (Canada), and Nunavut (Canada). The authors from across these northern regions will share their research, centering the significance of place-based pedagogies in learning and mental well-being, the importance of teacher education in preparing teachers for their role with northern children, and the challenge of integrating traditional Indigenous knowledges with the demands of globalization. At the heart of all of the papers is relationships—the interrelationships between people and the land, culture and identity, and educators and students.

The log-in instructions for this session are available here.
A Whale of a Time5-7pmThe Faculty of Science is hosting a social to recognize Research Week 2021. It will take place in the Whale Atrium of the Core Science Facility (CSF-1301), St. John's Campus. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase, including a limited supply of Landwash Brewery’s ‘Whale of a Time’ beer, created in partnership with the Faculty of Science. Light snacks will also be provided. Please RSVP by Monday, Nov. 22, 9 a.m. to science@mun.ca to attend. Proof of vaccination (ex. NLVaxPass) will be required, as well as a photo id.
Pre-Conference Project Grant Writing Workshop6-8pmMemorial’s Faculty of Nursing and its partner sites -- the Western Regional School of Nursing and Centre for Nursing Studies -- have planned a Nursing Research Day Conference taking place on Friday, Nov. 26 (see below). This is a pre-conference workshop.

Facilitators: Dr. April Pike, associate dean (Research), Faculty of Nursing & Dr. Trina Kirby-Butler, grants facilitation officer, Faculty of Nursing and School of Social Work.

This session is taking place in-person in room H-2956 in Memorial University's Faculty of Nursing Room, St. John's Campus.
Canada Ocean Lecture7pmJoin Dr. David Murrin, director general of the National Research Council's Ocean, Coastal and River Engineering Research Centre, as he delivers the next installment of the Canada Ocean Lecture Series. The title of his presentation is: Mobilizing Research and Knowledge for Changing Ocean Environments. 

Register here for the lecture.

This will be a virtual presentation. Please see here for more information.

Initiated in 2006, the Canada Ocean Lecture Series is a joint initiative between the registered charity Shorefast, Memorial University and other partners.

This event is being presented in partnership with the Conference and Event Services unit at Memorial.
Friday, Nov. 26
Showcasing Innovations in Nursing Research 9am-4pmMemorial’s Faculty of Nursing and its partner sites -- the Western Regional School of Nursing and Centre for Nursing Studies -- have planned a Nursing Research Day Conference.

This is a hybrid event.

The conference is taking place at the Centre for Nursing Studies, Room G05, St. John's.

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Alex Clark [via Webex], dean, Faculty of Health Disciplines, Athabasca University.
Small-scale fisheries research symposium: what does getting “small” right mean to you?1030-1130am

and

1230-130pm

There are two events being planned by the research project Too Big To Ignore: Global Partnership for Small-Scale Fisheries Research (TBTI), which is led by Dr. Ratana Chuenpagdee, University Research Professor. 

The purpose of these events is to raise awareness about the contributions of small-scale fisheries, but it is also just to get the conversation going. Talking about fisheries issues which are relevant on a local and global scale in an open, honest, critical, positive and curious manner is a vital part of the research process. Organizers invite students and community members at Memorial to contribute to this conversation as we learn together and ground our education in Newfoundland and Labrador. Ultimately organizers hope to understand: what does getting "small" right mean to you?

Organizers are hosting an online symposium from 1030-1130am. Virtual log-in instructions for the symposium are available here.

The symposium contains a PowerPoint presentation, where organizers will present a few stories about fisheries, and statistics showing they are “too big to ignore.” They will show a short video of the significance of fisheries for coastal Indigenous communities in Canada. This is intended to create a jumping off point for the discussion. During the discussion, organizers will have break-out rooms where each group can discuss a series of questions, before coming back together. Questions concern food justice, the importance of scale, what “governance” means, and finally, how creating a just space for fishing people relates to our own experiences. In conclusion, organizers will use the Padlet app to record everyone’s responses to the question: what does “getting small right” mean to you?

From 1230-130 pm, organizers will have a booth in the University Centre, St. John's Campus. At the booth, there will be opportunities for researchers to ask questions to those walking by or for those who visit the booth to ask questions. If inspiration is needed, an interactive method of question-asking, in the form of a couple of boxes of index cards labeled “questions for us” and “questions for you,” will be available. A zine (short magazine) will contain relevant information. It can be handed out at the booth, or anytime afterwards. In fact, the zine can be useful for years to come!
Fisheries and Marine Institute presents All hands on deck: Academic-industry collaborations within the Marine Institute accelerate research and training opportunities in a changing ocean.1030-1130amWhat contributes to the unique and diverse research and training opportunities within the Fisheries and Marine Institute? One aspect is the breadth and depth of industry-academic collaborations. This panel of MI students and researchers will discuss this issue through short presentations addressing a common set of questions from their own perspectives and examples – Why collaborate? How were collaborations formed? What are the benefits for research and training? And What is the future of collaboration in your field(s)? What unique opportunities do these collaborations offer to ocean research? This session will be hosted via MS Teams. Registration details are available here.
John & Judy Bragg Family Foundation Research Grants: Application Process Overview10:30-11:30am Atlantic / 11am-noon NewfoundlandDo you have an idea for a research project related to Northern farming and food systems? Join the Pye Centre for Northern Boreal Food Systems and the School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies for an online webinar that provides an overview of the John & Judy Bragg Family Foundation Applied Research Fund. These grants are available to academic, community, and government-based researchers; Labrador farmers; researchers; students; and community organizations. We’ll walk through the application process, the principles and practices of community farm-based research, and how to think about planning and preparing your applications.

This public session will be held virtually via Zoom. Please email pyecentre@mun.ca by Friday, Nov. 19 to register and receive the Zoom meeting information.
SSHRC Partnerships Program Overview Webinar11am-noonJoin HSS Grant Facilitation Officers for an online webinar which will provide an overview of SSHRC’s Partnership Program, which includes Partnership Engage, Partnership Development, and Partnership Grants. We’ll walk through the aims and objectives of the program, how to think about planning applications for upcoming competitions, and how to build your partnerships with external organizations. Researchers from all faculties are welcome. Please email hssresearchgrants@mun.ca for Webex details.
Launch of the 2020 Research Report: Powered by Grenfell11amJoin the Office of Research and Graduate Studies for the official launch of Powered by Grenfell, the 2020 Research Report. Refreshments to be provided! Location: Arts and Science "Lower Airport Lounge" (AS extension), Grenfell Campus. To attend online, email pgill@grenfell.mun.ca for details.
School of Pharmacy Research Day and keynote address1215-415pmPharmacy Research Day celebrates advancements in healthcare collaboration, drug discovery and delivery, health outcomes and teaching and learning research in pharmacy. The day includes a keynote address, a poster competition and mini presentations. See here for full schedule and more details.

Keynote address: Accelerating Research Effort to Reach Patients Sooner

Due to the dire situation of the current global pandemic, regulatory agencies expedited the approval process for COVID-19 therapeutic products and vaccines. This was a challenging approach with both strengths and limitations. We witnessed an unprecedented level of collaboration between scientists and regulators on a global scale, which accelerated research, bringing about new diagnostic techniques and treatments for COVID-19, as well as novel vaccine platforms. This model may be applicable to other areas of health research. We need to think globally and act locally. Academic researchers engaged in basic and applied research to improve patient care should do their part to facilitate the regulatory approval process expected at a future date. They will have to broaden their skillset and learn to think like a regulator in anticipation of challenges in the approval process; this will accelerate access to new therapies by patients. In his talk, Dr. Krishnan Tirunellai, former Memorial Pharmacy Professor and Health Canada Senior Scientific Advisor in pre- and post-market drug submissions in new and generic drugs division, will address some of these issues.

Log-in instructions for this session are available here.
ACENET presents Tools of the Trade - Incorporating a Digital Research Assignment into your Humanities or Social Sciences course1230-130pmHumanities and Social Science research increasingly takes place using digital resources and tools; teaching students to undertake effective research means introducing them to existing digital resources. In this discussion, guest speaker Dr. Laura Estill shares an assignment that helps students learn how to undertake original research using digital resources. The examples here are taken from Shakespeare studies but the assignment techniques could be used in other humanities and social sciences classes. Digital humanities resources offer a “brave new world” for research and teaching; there is no ready-made map for this ever-changing landscape.

Dr. Laura Estill is a Canada Research Chair in Digital Humanities and Associate Professor of English at St. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, Canada. Her monograph (Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts: Watching, Reading, Changing Plays, 2015) and co-edited collections (Early Modern Studies after the Digital Turn, 2016 and Early British Drama in Manuscript, 2019) speak to her interest in both the scribal and the digital. Her most recent articles and chapters have appeared in The Seventeenth Century, Humanities, Doing More Digital Humanities, Shakespeare’s Theatrical Documents, and The Arden Research Handbook of Shakespeare and Textual Studies. She is co-editor of Early Modern Digital Review and editor of DEx: A Database of Dramatic Extracts. Registration details for this session are available here online.
Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research, Fisheries and Marine Institute presents The influence of climate and prey availability on flatfish on the Newfoundland Grand Bank1-140pmPhD candidate will Matthew Robertson will outline his thesis research that focuses on understanding the influence of climate and prey availability on flatfish on the Grand Bank off Newfoundland. This session will be hosted via MS Teams. Registration details are available here.

Matthew Robertson is a PhD candidate in Fisheries Science at the Fisheries & Marine Institute, Memorial University of Newfoundland. For his PhD research, Matt is modelling the spatial, predation, and population dynamics of two flatfishes – American plaice and yellowtail flounder, on the Newfoundland Grand Bank. Matt was awarded the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship for this research. Matt’s research interests lie in answering macro-scale ecological questions in fisheries, and how those questions can be addressed in ways that can be used to improve advice for ecosystem management.
New Research in Old Records, hosted by Memorial Archives2-3pmThree researchers from different disciplines conducting research in archives at Memorial will talk about their projects and the impact of archives on their work. Each will present a synopsis of their work, explaining how primary sources from the archives have influenced the direction of their research. They will also talk about the highs and lows of conducting archival research at Memorial and consider how collections might be made more accessible. An archivist from each of the archives represented in the session - Archives and Special Collections (QEII Library), the Memorial University of Newfoundland Folklore and Language Archive (HSS) and the Maritime History Archive (HSS) - will join the speakers for a questions at the end. Log-in instructions for this session are available here.
                        





Please check back for updates, additional events and information. Please note, sessions are subject to change.


We acknowledge that the lands on which Memorial University’s campuses are situated are in the traditional territories of diverse Indigenous groups, and we acknowledge with respect the diverse histories and cultures of the Beothuk, Mi’kmaq, Innu, and Inuit of this province.

Contact

Research

230 Elizabeth Ave, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1B 3X9

Postal Address: P.O. Box 4200, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1C 5S7

Tel: (709) 864-8000