By Stephen Riggins
Scott Kenney’s manuscript Canadian Victims of Crime: Critical Insights has been accepted for publication by CSP/Women’s Press. His book critically considers the meanings which emerge in the various contexts experienced by victims of crime. These include the initial impacts of crime; social dynamics encountered by victims in their families and informal social settings; gender and coping strategies; the justice system; encounters with victim service programs, support groups, and shelters; the experiences of victims in restorative justice sessions; and comparisons of the positions of victims in developing countries. Scott draws on original qualitative research about homicide and the criminal justice system, as well as victim service organizations and restorative justice. Read more...
By Doug House
Feeling very grown up, but in reality a very innocent sixteen-year old, I first attended Memorial in 1960 at the old campus on Parade Street. At the time, MUN was a very small institution with approximately 1000 students, more like the college it had been up until 1950 than the large, comprehensive university it is today. In 1961, I was privileged to have been a member of the first cohort of students to go to the brand new campus on Elizabeth Avenue. At the time, the new campus seemed huge – four modern buildings: Arts and Administration, Science, the Library (now the Henrietta Harvey Building) and the Physical Education Building with a spanking new, full-sized gymnasium, squash courts and a swimming pool. Like most students, I didn’t have much of an idea about what I wanted to do with my life. Read more...
By Ross A. Klein, MUN School of Social Work
I’ve always had my feet in two camps. As an undergraduate student I was attracted to sociology for its vantage point of social observation – objective but critical – and to social work for its activist orientation. The time was the late 1960s/early 1970s, the anti-war movement was at its peak, sociology departments were flush with soft funding for community-based organization and research, and sociology faculties had clearly projected political orientations. My foot in sociology provided theory and critical thinking, both essential elements in a foundation for social activism. My foot in social work, in complementary fashion, taught methods of community development and social activism for effecting change. Saul Alinsky, a sociologist, was required reading for students of social work at the time. Much of what I learned about community organizing and social action was drawn from sociology and sociological theory. Read more...
Victor Zaslavsky, who taught in the MUN Department of Sociology from 1975 until his retirement in 1995, was the 2008 recipient of the highly prestigious Hannah Arendt Prize for Political Thought. Victor received the award for his book Klassensäuberung: Das Massaker von Katyn. Read more...