Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Arts (2010/2011)
8.31 Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies

Program Supervisor: Dr. R. Whitaker, Department of Anthropology

8.31.1 General

The Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Program is for students whose Major interests lie in areas which overlap departmental boundaries. It was originally (1973-80) a program option within both the Anthropology and Sociology Departments. The purpose of the program is to provide for a systematic study of human society through accessible works of Sociology and Anthropology which are not narrowly limited to one discipline. Courses are topical, regional or integrative in character, and a balanced plan of study will include some of each type, with the integrative courses scheduled to follow and draw together lessons of the others. The program has both Major and Minor components, the details of which are given below. In constructing their individual study plans, students should consult the Program Supervisor wherever questions arise as to the optimum sequence or suitability of particular courses. S/A program courses are also part of the Sociology and Anthropology department listings, and may be taken by students in these and other departments, providing they have the appropriate prerequisites or permission of the instructor.

8.31.2 Prerequisites

S/A courses at the 2000 level have no prerequisites. For courses at the 3000 or 4000 level students must have taken 6 credit hours in S/A courses at the 2000 level. For prerequisites for all Sociology and Anthropology courses other than S/A courses see the Sociology or Anthropology departmental regulations. In addition, some courses may have other specific prerequisites, as noted in this calendar, or as set out in the course description. These may, however, be waived at the discretion of the Program Supervisor or delegate for students who can demonstrate they have equivalent or alternate preparation for the course. If there is any question about this students should, in the first instance, consult the instructor.

8.31.3 S/A Major Program

A major in the S/A program must complete at least 36 credit hours, consisting of 24 credit hours in S/A courses, plus a minimum of 12 additional credit hours (see below).

The 24 credit hours in S/A must include the following:

  1. Nine credit hours in introductory courses, including:

    1. At least 6 credit hours in S/A courses at the 2000 level;

    2. Three credit hours in courses chosen from Sociology 1000, Sociology 2000, Sociology 2250, Anthropology 1031, or an additional 2000 level S/A course.

    Note:

    Ideally, the 9 credit hours in courses at the introductory level should be taken before work on the 3000 level is begun; however, one introductory course may be taken concurrent to work at the 3000 level.

  2. S/A 3600, followed by S/A 4000.

  3. An additional 3 credit hours from S/A courses at the 4000 level.

  4. Six additional credit hours in S/A courses at the 3000 or 4000 level, to complete the 24 S/A credit hours requirement.

The 12 additional credit hours shall be completed from any Sociology, Anthropology or S/A courses, in any combination, at least 6 credit hours of which must be taken in courses at the 3000 or 4000 levels.

8.31.4 S/A Minor Program

A Minor in Sociology/Anthropology requires completion of 24 credit hours in S/A courses, as follows:

  1. at least 9 credit hours in courses at the 2000 level

  2. at least 15 credit hours in courses at the 3000 and 4000 level, including S/A 3600 and S/A 4000.

Students will normally complete at least 6 credit hours in courses at the 2000-level before proceeding to the 3000 and 4000 levels.

8.31.5 Honours Program

To be accepted into the Honours Program, a student must submit an "Application for Admission to Honours Program" form to the S/A Program Supervisor. A successful applicant will not only meet the criteria laid out in the Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Arts, but also have a proposal accepted for an honours essay research topic, for which the student has identified a faculty member who has indicated willingness to act as supervisor.

Honours students are required to complete at least 60 credit hours of S/A, Anthropology and Sociology courses, including all courses required for the Major in Sociology/Anthropology, of which at least 39 credit hours must be in S/A courses. The courses must include either S/A 4990 or 4991 and must meet the requirements outlined in the Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Arts.

8.31.6 Course Descriptions

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Sociology/Anthropology courses are designated by S/A.

2200

Communities

(S/A)

is an interdisciplinary examination of the concept of Community. Readings will include community studies from North America and Europe.

2210

Communication and Culture

(S/A)

is an examination of verbal and non-verbal systems of communication, and the influence of language on human cognition.

2220

Labrador Society and Culture

(S/A)

examines the Sociology and Anthropology of Labrador. The focus is on social and cultural aspects of contemporary Labrador.

2230

Newfoundland Society and Culture

(S/A)

(same as Folklore 2230) examines the Sociology and Anthropology of the Island of Newfoundland. The focus is on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of S/A 2230 and Folklore 2230.

2240

Canadian Society and Culture

(S/A)

is a descriptive and analytic approach to the development of Canadian society and culture.

2260

War and Aggression

(S/A)

is a critical review of ethological, psychological and sociological approaches to the understanding of violence and organized aggression.

2270

Families

(S/A)

is a comparative and historical perspective on the family as a social institution, the range of variation in its structure and the determinants of its development.

2280

The City

(S/A)

examines varieties of urban life around the world and through history. The city as habitat and as spectacle.

2350

Religious Institutions

(S/A)

(same as Religious Studies 2350) is a comparative study of religious institutions and beliefs, calendrical feasts and solemnities, religious roles and hierarchies, ritual innovation and revitalization.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of S/A 2350 and Religious Studies 2350.

3100

Dominance and Power

(S/A)

is a study of dominance behaviour in human societies, surveying the range from private to public and from openly exploitative to fully legitimate power systems.

3140

Social Movements

(S/A)

is an examination of social movements which challenge prevailing social institutions and cultural values. Social movements considered may include religious cults and sects, millenarian movements, attempts at utopian and communal living, feminism, labour and revolutionary movements.

3210

Persistence and Change in Rural Society

(S/A)

assesses the social and cultural significance of the rural experience in the face of expanding urbanism. Topics may include (a) the nature of rural society in Canada, (b) similarities between Canadian and European rural society, c) utopian and anarchist movements in rural life, and (d) reaction of agricultural populations to external influence.

3220

Work and Society

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3240

Regional Studies: Contemporary Native Peoples of Canada

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3241

Regional Studies: The Atlantic

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3242

European Societies

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3249

Peoples of the Pacific

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3254-3257

Regional Studies

(S/A)

are interdisciplinary approaches to the study of selected regions.

3260

Social and Economic Development

(S/A)

is an examination of theories of development including a critical analysis of empirical situations to which they are applied.

3314

Gender and Society

(S/A)

is an examination of biological, psychological, social and cultural aspects of gender, with an emphasis upon contemporary directions of change in sex roles.

3317

Oil and Society

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3318

Culture and Aging

(S/A)

is an introduction to the study of aging from a social and cultural perspective. Distinctions between the biological and social elements of the aging process will be examined. The overview of social and cultural gerontology includes social, economic and political influences on later life, as well as the culture-based needs and aspirations of the aged.

3320

Terrorism and Society

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3330

Interdisciplinary Specialities

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3331-3339

Interdisciplinary Specialities

(S/A)

are interdisciplinary approaches to topics of special interest in Sociology and Anthropology.

3600

The Use of Theory in Sociology and Anthropology

(S/A)

is an examination of the nature of explanation in Sociology and Anthropology. Discusses relationships among the major integrating theories in Sociology and Anthropology and considers how empirical data can be treated from several different theoretical viewpoints. Required for S/A Majors and Minors. Open to others by permission of the instructor.

3610

Society and the Life Cycle

(S/A)

- inactive course.

3630

New Media Methods in Social Research

(S/A)

(same as Anthropology 3630). This course will explore non-print means for recording social behaviour and will utilize various forms of the media as a descriptive and an analytic tool.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of S/A 3630 and Anthropology 3630.

3700

Social and Cultural Change

(S/A)

- inactive course.

4000

Society and Culture

(S/A)

is a seminar course designed for S/A Majors. Focuses on some of the fundamental questions of social order and social life in their philosophical and ethical dimensions, with particular reference to the history of ideas. Required course for S/A Majors and Minors. Open to others by permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: S/A 3600.

4070

Aboriginal Self-Governance

(S/A)

is an advanced course on contemporary issues on the development of, and barriers to, self-government among Canadian aboriginal peoples. The focus will be on topics such as land claims and claims settlements, self-government agreements and proposed agreements, economic development, environmental and social impact of industrial developments, and cultural and religious revival.

Prerequisite: S/A 3240.

4071

Social and Cultural Aspects of Health and Illness

(S/A)

- inactive course.

4072

Social and Cultural Aspects of Death

(S/A)

covers topics which may include: symbolic meanings and values attached to death; cultural and historical variations in the management of death, e.g. treatment of the 'terminally ill', burial rites, the mourning process, and the social fate of survivors, together with the social and psychological meanings of these behaviours. Open to those without normal prerequisites by permission of the Instructor.

4073

Studies in Underclass Life

(S/A)

is a critical inquiry into the social sources of human misery and suffering that characterize life in the underclass.

4074

Ritual and Ceremony

(S/A)

- inactive course.

4077

Advanced Studies in Terror and Society

(S/A)

- inactive course.

4089

Language and Social Change

(S/A)

- inactive course.

4091

Oil and Development

(S/A)

- inactive course.

4092

Gender and Social Theory

(S/A)

is a seminar which will develop the material covered in S/A 3314 at a more theoretical level. It will cover the history of social thought as it applies to issues of gender, and will discuss some theoretical debates in the area of gender and social theory.

Prerequisite: S/A 3314 or permission of the instructor.

4110

Culture and Personality

(S/A)

- inactive course.

4140-4149

Advanced Interdisciplinary Specialities

(S/A)

is an advanced interdisciplinary approaches to various topics of importance in the Social Sciences. By permission of the instructor.

4990

Sociology/Anthropology Honours Essay

(S/A)

is required as part of the honours program.

4991

Sociology/Anthropology Comprehensive Examination

(S/A)

is required as part of the honours program.