Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Arts (2010/2011)
8.25 Philosophy
8.25.1 General

Philosophy courses may be taken singly as general arts electives or as part of a Minor, Major, Honours or multidisciplinary program. Normally, Philosophy 1200 is a prerequisite for all philosophy courses at the 3000 level and above, though all courses are open to any student as electives with the permission of the Head of Department. Philosophy 1000, or the former Philosophy 1600, is not required for further courses in philosophy but is of particular value to students interested in the Social Sciences and Humanities.

8.25.2 Major Program

The major program in Philosophy consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours in courses chosen in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. Philosophy 1200, Philosophy 2000 or 2220, Philosophy 2210, Philosophy 2230 or 3400, Philosophy 2701 or 2702, Philosophy 3730 or 3740, Philosophy 3800 or 3820 or 3830 or 3840 or 3850 or 3860 or 3880 or 3890, Philosophy 3910 or 3920 or 3940

  2. One course in the 4700-4790 series

  3. One course in the 4800-4890 series

  4. An additional 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses

Notes:

  1. Students declaring a major in Philosophy must choose a program advisor in consultation with the Head of the Department and the faculty member concerned.

  2. Of the courses numbered 1000, 1001, 1003, the former PHIL 1600, not more than two may be counted towards the Major.

8.25.3 Minor Program

The minor program in Philosophy consists of a minimum of 24 credit hours in courses which must be chosen in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. Philosophy 1200, Philosophy 2000 or 2210 or 2220, Philosophy 2230 or 3400, Philosophy 2701 or 2702

  2. One of Philosophy 3730, 3740, 3800, 3820, 3830, 3840, 3850, 3860, 3880, 3890

  3. An additional 9 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000-level or higher.

Notes:

  1. Students declaring a Minor in Philosophy may choose to have a program advisor by mutual agreement with a member of the Philosophy Department.

  2. Of the courses numbered 1000, 1001, 1003, the former PHIL 1600, not more than two may be counted towards the Minor.

8.25.4 Honours Program

The full Honours program requires a minimum of 60 credit hours in Philosophy courses; Joint Honours requires a minimum of 45 credit hours in Philosophy courses. These must include:

  1. Philosophy 1200, Philosophy 2000 or 2220, Philosophy 2210, Philosophy 2230, Philosophy 3400, Philosophy 2701 or 2702, Philosophy 3730 or 3740, Philosophy 3800 or 3820 or 3830 or 3840 or 3850, Philosophy 3860 or 3880 or 3890, Philosophy 3910, Philosophy 3920 or 3940

  2. One course in the 4700-4790 series

  3. One course in the 4800-4890 series

  4. An additional 3 credit hours in courses at the 4000 level

  5. Either Philosophy 4998 or 4999

  6. Candidates for Joint Honours must choose 4998*

  7. Candidates for full Honours may take 4999 only with permission of the Department.

  8. Other Philosophy courses to a total of 60 credit hours for Full Honours, 45 credit hours for Joint Honours.

* Candidates for Joint Honours who elect to fulfill the honours requirement in the other discipline are not required to take the Comprehensive Examination. (See Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Arts)

8.25.5 Course Descriptions

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Some sections of Philosophy 1000, 1200, the former Philosophy 1600, and Philosophy 2500-2599 may qualify as Research/Writing courses for the B.A. Core requirements. Consult each semester's Undergraduate Registration Procedures for the R/W designation.

  • Philosophy courses are designated by PHIL.

1000

Philosophy of Human Nature

is an approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern, and the world views associated with them.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 1000 and the former PHIL 1001 or the former PHIL 1600.

1100

Critical Thinking

aims to impart critical analytic skills: i.e., the ability to recognize good and bad arguments, to explain why a particular argument is good or bad, and a general understanding of why a good argument ought to persuade and a bad argument ought not to persuade.

1200

Introduction to Philosophy

is a general introduction to the study of Philosophy both as a contemporary intellectual discipline and as a body of knowledge. The course covers the main divisions, fundamental questions and essential terminology of Philosophy through a reading of classical texts. (It is a required course for further courses in Philosophy programs. It is intended for students in first year who have completed one semester of university education).

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 1200 and the former 2200.

2000

Introduction to Metaphysics

is an introduction to the systematic inquiry into the nature of reality. Topic may include the nature of being, time, the question of God, appearance and reality, the one and the many, mind and matter, essence and existence.

Prerequisite/Co-requisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department.

2210

Logic

is an introduction to traditional and modern logic. Open in any year to all students wishing acquaintance with basic logical skills.

2220

Epistemology

examines various concepts of knowledge - empirical, rational, transcendental, systematic. Their metaphysical grounds and implications. The concept of scientific knowledge; real and abstract entities; objectivity and subjectivity.

2230

Moral Philosophy

examines the sources and validity of ethical principles which underlie individual and social action.

2300

Philosophy of Language and Mind

(same as Linguistics 2300 and the former Linguistics 2710) is a survey of philosophical thinking about human language and thought, and about how these phenomena relate to the rest of the natural world. Topics covered include the nature of language, the relations between thought and language, and the nature of consciousness.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2300, the former PHIL 2710, Linguistics 2300 and the former Linguistics 2710.

2400

Introduction to Philosophy of Law

employs historical and contemporary sources to explore major traditions and concepts in the philosophy of law. Topics covered include natural law, legal positivism, the nature of legal interpretation, the relationship between law and morality, and the concepts of rights, responsibility, and justice.

2500-2550

Contemporary Issues

discusses the philosophical dimensions of an area of practical concern such as contemporary culture, professional ethics, leisure, education, the mass media, gender, war and human rights.

2541

Philosophy and Western Spirituality

will examine Western theories and practices of soul-care which parallel and resonate with Eastern approaches. We will learn what is distinctive to Western approaches with selections from Socrates, Jesus, Paul, Plotinus, Augustine, Eckhart, Alchemy, Freud, Jung and Foucault. Students will not only gain knowledge of this lost road in Western culture, but also an understanding of themselves.

2551

Health Ethics

examines concepts of health and illness and their ethical implications.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2551 and the former PHIL 2803

2552

Mental Health Ethics

examines concepts of mental health and illness and their ethical implications.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2552 and the former PHIL 2802

2553

Biomedical Ethics

examines medical dilemmas from legal and ethical points of view.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2553 and the former PHIL 2807

2561

Environmental Ethics

examines concepts of nature and their ethical implications.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2561 and the former PHIL 2809

2571

Technology

examines concepts of technology and their ethical implications.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2571 and the former PHIL 2801

2581

Philosophy of Film

introduces some of the central philosophers, topics and themes in the philosophy of film. Topics and themes include: the nature of film image, the relationship between film and “reality”, the social/political role and function of film and the nature and value of the documentary. The course will also consider the representation of broader philosophical ideas in film. A film or films will accompany each section.

2591

Restorative Justice

explores the phenomenon of violence. When we understand violence, the need for justice quickly comes into view. With this need, however, comes a complex mixture of personal and political affairs. Justice can be retaliatory or restorative. The meaning and consequences of each kind of approach to justice will be traced through selected ancient and contemporary authors.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2591 and the former PHIL 2810

2701

History of Ancient Philosophy

(same as Classics 2701) is a survey of the origin and development of Western philosophy among the Greeks and Romans.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2701 or Classics 2701.

2702

History of Modern Philosophy

is a survey of the development of Western philosophy since the 17th century.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 2702, 3700, or 3701.

3110

Intermediate Logic

examines techniques and topics in the logic of propositions, of predicates and of induction and probability. Normally the second course in logic.

Prerequisite: PHIL 2210 or permission of the Department

8.25.5.1 Philosophy of....Series

3120

Philosophy of Language

investigates various uses of language and its relationship to thought, as well as particular features of language, such as meaning, synonymy, reference, translation and interpretation.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3150

Philosophy of the Natural Sciences

examines major issues in the origins, methods and philosophical implications of science. Science as a form of knowledge; its relation to metaphysics; to more general theories of knowledge. Science and values.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3160

Hermeneutics, Semiotics and Deconstruction

will examine methodological foundations of psychology, cognitive science and the social sciences, Philosophical presuppositions and implications of these approaches to human nature.

3400

Political Philosophy

examines leading philosophical ideas concerning the origin and justification of political institutions.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3500

Philosophy of Religion

(same as Religious Studies 3500) examines the philosophical aspects of religious belief, religious language and theology.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 3500 or Religious Studies 3500.

3600

Philosophy of the Humanities

examines the expression and interpretation in the humanistic disciplines: theology, history, art and literature, language. Philosophical Hermeneutics.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3610

Philosophy and Literature

- inactive course.

3620

Philosophy of Art

- inactive course.

8.25.5.2 Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Series

3730

Plato

examines selections from the works of the Greek "lovers of wisdom" - the first philosophers - particularly Plato.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3740

Aristotle

examines the works and legacy of perhaps the most influential systematic thinker of all time.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3760

Medieval Philosophy

- inactive course.

3790

Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

- inactive course.

8.25.5.3 17th to 18th Century Series

3800

Descartes

is a systematic introduction to the works and thought of the "father of modern philosophy".

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3820

Rationalism

is a study of rationalism in Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz and of subsequent developments of this standpoint.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3830

Empiricism

is a study of classical empiricism in the works of Locke, Berkeley and Hume and of later developments of this philosophical standpoint.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3840

Hume

is a study of the work and influence of Hume on theories of knowledge, metaphysics and moral philosophy.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3850

Kant's Theory of Knowledge

is an introduction to the work of one of the most influential thinkers of the modern era, concentrating on his theory of knowledge, particularly as stated in the Critique of Pure Reason.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3851

Kant's Ethics

is an introduction to the work of one of the most influential thinkers of the modern era, concentrating on his ethics, particularly as stated in The Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals and The Critique of Practical Reason.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

8.25.5.4 19th Century Series

3860

Hegel

examines selections from Hegel's system with emphasis on the nature of dialectical and speculative philosophy and its enormous influence in the present time.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3870

Utilitarianism

examines moral, political and jurisprudential themes in Bentham, J.S. Mill and their followers. Recent utilitarian theories.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3880

Post-Idealist Thought

examines 19th century reactions to idealist systems, the critique of Metaphysics, the rise of Positivism.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3890

Marxism

examines the political, social and historical theories of Marx and Engels and their later developments; themes in Marxist analysis of class and capitalism.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

8.25.5.5 20th to 21st Century Series

3900

Process Philosophy

- inactive course.

3910

Analytic Philosophy

examines selections from established texts in contemporary analytic philosophy: Russell, Carnap, Wittgenstein and others.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3920

Phenomenology

is an introduction to the philosophy of Husserl and some of his followers, e.g. Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3930

Pragmatism

examines the pragmatist standpoint from Peirce to the present.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

3940

Existentialism

examines the philosophy and literature of Existentialism from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Dostoevsky to Sartre, de Beauvoir and Camus.

Prerequisite: PHIL 1200 or permission of the Department

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL 3940 and 3980.

3950

Recent Philosophy

- inactive course.

8.25.5.6 4000-Level and Higher

4100

Seminar in Logic and the Philosophy of Mathematics

topics will be announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4110

Seminar in Logic and the Philosophy of Mathematics

- inactive course.

4150

Seminar in the Philosophy of Science

topics will be announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4160

Seminar in the Philosophy of Science

- inactive course.

4200 and 4210

Seminar in the Philosophy of Mind

- inactive course.

4250 and 4260

Seminar in Metaphysics and Epistemology

topics will be announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4300 and 4310

Seminar in Ethics

topics will be announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4350 and 4360

Seminar in the Philosophy of Law

- inactive course.

4400 and 4410

Seminar in Political Philosophy

- inactive course.

4450 and 4460

Seminar in the Philosophy of History

- inactive course.

4500 and 4510

Seminar in the Philosophy of Religion

- inactive course.

4520 and 4530

Seminar in Philosophical Background to Literature

- inactive course.

4550

Seminar in the Philosophy of Language

topics will be announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4560

Seminar in the Philosophy of Language

- inactive course.

4600 and 4610

Seminar in Aesthetics

- inactive course.

4700-4790

Seminar in Special Authors and Texts

topics will be announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4800-4890

Seminar in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Philosophy

topics will be announced by the Department.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4900

Advanced Readings in Ethics

is an individualized course tailored to the specialized moral interests of each student.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4998

Comprehensive Examination

is part of the Honours program.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

4999

Honours Essay

is part of the Honours program.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or permission of the Department

5000

Instructional Field Placement in Applied Ethics

is a part-time, one semester period of practical work designed to provide experience in medical, psychiatric, environmental, or other similar settings. Students may be placed, e.g., in a government policy office or a hospital.

Note:

Credit for this course can be used only towards the Diploma in Applied Ethics.