Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Arts (2010/2011)
8.11 English Language and Literature
8.11.1 General Degree
  1. One of English 1000, 1050, 1080, the former 1100 and one of English 1001, 1051, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1110 are prerequisites for all other courses. In the case of students whose first language is not English and who take 1020 or 1030, that course and one of English 1000, 1001, 1021, 1050, 1051, 1080, 1101, 1102, 1103 or the former 1100 are prerequisites for all other courses.

  2. Students who choose English as their Major must include 36 credit hours in courses in the subject, including:

    1. English 2000 and 2001;

    2. English 2390;

    3. English 3200 or 3201;

    4. Three credit hours in Canadian literature;

    5. Three credit hours in American literature;

    6. Six credit hours at the 4000-level;

    7. Six credit hours in additional English courses.

    Notes:

    1. At least 6 credit hours must be at the 3000-level.

    2. Students must normally complete English 2000 and English 2001 before they are eligible to register for courses at the 4000-level.

  3. In addition to the general major defined in 2. above, students may take a specialization in theatre/drama within the English major. Admission to this specialization is by application only, and application may be made only after English 2002 has been completed. Normally students will apply for admission at the end of their second year. Application forms are available from the Department.

    In this specialization, students must complete 39 credit hours in courses as follows:

    1. Six credit hours in English courses at the first-year level (see Clause 1. above).

    2. English 2000, 2002, 2390, 3350, 3351, 4400, 4401;

    3. Three credit hours in one of 3200, 3201;

    4. Three credit hours in one of 4300, 4301;

    5. Three credit hours in one of English 3156, 3171, 3260 or 4302;

    6. Three credit hours in one of English 3021, 3022, 3181, or 3302.

  4. In addition to the general major defined in 2. above students may take a specialization in language within the English major. In this specialization students must complete 42 credit hours in courses as follows :

    1. Six credit hours in courses at the first-year level (see Clause 1. above).

    2. English 2000, 2400, 2401;

    3. Three credit hours in one of 2390, 3651;

    4. Three credit hours in one of 3200, 3201;

    5. At least 21 credit hours chosen from the following courses, of which at least two courses shall have an initial digit "3" and at least two courses an initial digit "4": 2600, 2601, 3500, 3501, 3650, 3651, 3700, 3814, 4403, 4420, 4421, 4500, 4501, 4600, and 4601.

    Students in this specialization are advised to take 2390 before 3650 and to take 2400 before 2401.

  5. Students who choose English as their minor must complete at least 24 credit hours in the subject. These must include:

    1. One of English 2002, 2003, 2004, 2120, 2121, 2210, 2211, 2212, 2213, 2214, 2811;

    2. English 2390;

    3. One of English 3200 or 3201;

    4. Three credit hours in Canadian literature;

    5. Six credit hours in additional English courses.

    Note:

    At least 6 credit hours must be at the 3000-level.

    Requirements for the minor may not be chosen from courses conducted by another Department.

  6. No student shall register in any course having an initial digit "3" unless he/she has successfully completed at least 6 credit hours in courses having an initial digit "2".

  7. No student shall register in any course having an initial digit "4" unless he/she has successfully completed at least 6 credit hours in courses having an initial digit "3".

  8. English 3395 (Grenfell College) will be accepted as a substitute for English 2390 for fulfilling the requirements of the English major.

  9. The programs at the Sir Wilfred Grenfell College contain some courses that are not available in St. John's. Hence, students wishing to transfer from the St. John's campus to Grenfell College may have difficulty in completing their program in a timely fashion.

8.11.2 Honours Degree With English as Major Subject
  1. Courses will be chosen in consultation with the Head of Department.

  2. Students who choose to complete an Honours in English must complete 60 credit hours in the subject, including:

    1. English 2000 and 2001;

    2. English 2390;

    3. One of English 3200 or 3201;

    4. Three credit hours in Canadian literature;

    5. Three credit hours in American literature;

    6. English 4100 and 4101;

    7. English 4900;

    8. Three credit hours in pre-19th century literature (excluding 3200 and 3201);

    9. Three credit hours in 19th century literature;

    10. Three credit hours in 20th century literature;

    11. Two of 2600, 2601, 3500, 3501, 3600;

    12. Nine credit hours in additional English courses, six of which must be at the 4000-level;

    13. English 4999.

    Notes:

    1. At least 36 of the 60 credit hours required must be in English courses at the 3000-level or above. Courses at the 4000-level may not be chosen from those conducted by another department.

    2. A course that considers more than one national literature or century fulfills only one requirement for the Honours degree in English.

  3. In their final year, all Honours candidates are required to present an Honours Essay (4999); the topic of the Honours Essay is to be approved by the Head.

  4. English 3395 (Grenfell College) will be accepted as a substitute for English 2390 for fulfilling the requirements of the English Honours degree.

8.11.3 Joint Honours Degree in English and Another Major Subject
  1. See Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Arts.

  2. Candidates shall complete at least 39 credit hours in courses in English beyond the first-year; and a student's program must be approved by the Head of the Department and conform to the General Regulations for Joint Honours degrees.

  3. The 39 credit hours shall include:

    1. English 2000 and 2001;

    2. English 2390;

    3. One of English 3200 or 3201;

    4. Three credit hours in Canadian literature;

    5. English 4100 and 4101;

    6. English 4900;

    7. Three credit hours in pre-19th century literature (excluding 3200/3201);

    8. Three credit hours in 19th century literature;

    9. Three credit hours in 20th century literature;

    10. Six credit hours in additional English courses at the 4000-level;.

    Note:

    At least 36 of the 60 credit hours required must be in English courses at the 3000-level or above. Courses at the 4000-level may not be chosen from those conducted by another department.

8.11.4 Course Descriptions

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Some sections of English 2000, 2001, 2002, 2010, 2122, 2211, 2214, 3175 and 3817 may qualify as Research/Writing courses for the B.A. Core requirements. Consult each semester's Undergraduate Registration Procedures for the R/W designation.

English courses are designated by ENGL.

Notes:

  1. Lists of texts and readings for courses may be obtained from the Secretary of the Department of English.

  2. Courses for which there is insufficient demand will not be given.

  3. ENGL 1000, 1050, 1080, and the former 1100 are courses for students who have attained a standard in Level III English acceptable to the Department.

  4. ENGL 1050 and 1051 are courses for students who have completed Level III English at a level of attainment acceptable to the Department.

  5. ENGL 1020 is a course for students whose first language is not English and who have passed 102F or have attained a standard acceptable to the Department on the English Placement Test.

  6. ENGL 1001, 1051, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1110 are courses which may be taken by students who have successfully completed 1000, 1050, 1080 or the former 1100. ENGL 1000, 1001, 1050, 1051, 1080, 1101, 1102, 1103, or the former 1100 are courses which may be taken by students who have successfully completed 1020 or 1030.

  7. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ENGL 1000, 1050, 1080, 1100 or for more than one of 1001, 1051, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1110.

  8. Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 1020 or 1030 and ENGL 1110, nor can they receive credit for both ENGL 1110 and ENGL 2010.

  9. Students may not receive credit for more than 6 credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits).

  10. Students who have passed 1020 may take as their second English course one of 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102, or 1103.

100C

Survey of the English Language I

- inactive course.

101C

Survey of the English Language II

- inactive course.

102C

Survey of the English Language III

- inactive course.

102F

Foundation English

is a non-credit course designed for students whose first language is other than English and whose knowledge and use of English do not meet the standards for entry into the regular first-year English courses.

Lectures: Four hours per week plus one hour conversation class.

Laboratory: One hour per week.

103C

Survey of the English Language IV

- inactive course.

1020

Writing for Second Language Students I

is an introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for non-native English-speaking students.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Note:

Admission to ENGL 1020 will be determined on the basis of the departmental English Placement Test or successful completion of ENGL 102F.

1021

Writing for Second Language Students II

develops skills in critical reading and writing of academic English, with emphasis on research and writing syntheses from sources, for non-native English-speaking students.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1020.

1030

Writing

- inactive course.

1031

Prose Literature

- inactive course.

1080

Critical Reading and Writing I

is an introduction to such literary forms as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the essay. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Note:

Credit will not be given for both ENGL 1080, and 1000, 1050 or the former 1100.

1101

Critical Reading and Writing II (Fiction)

is a study of such forms as the novel, the novella, the story sequence. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.

1102

Critical Reading and Writing II (Drama)

is a study of drama. Emphasis is place on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.

Note:

ENGL 1102 may not be used instead of ENGL 2002 as a prerequisite for entry into the Theatre-Drama specialization within the Major.

1103

Critical Reading and Writing II (Poetry)

is a study of poetry. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.

1110

Critical Reading and Writing II (Context, Substance, Style)

is an examination of prose texts such as essays, articles and reviews. Students write for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1000 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Notes:

  1. Credit can be obtained for only one of ENGL 1110 or ENGL 2010.

  2. Credit can be obtained for only one of ENGL 1020, 1030 or 1110.

2000

Major Writers to 1800

is an introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 2000, 2005, and 2110.

2001

Major Writers from 1800

is an introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.

Note:

Credit can be obtained for only one of ENGL 2001, 2007, and 2111.

2002

Drama

is a survey of drama from the Greeks to the present day.

Note:

Credit can be obtained for only one of ENGL 2002 and 2350.

2003

Poetry

is a study of poetry, which aims to increase the students critical understanding and appreciation of poetry, conducted through an examination of a wide variety of kinds and techniques.

2004

Short Fiction

is a study of short fiction which aims to give the students an appreciation of the short story as a literary form. The course will deal with the nature, history and development of short fiction by considering a variety of authors and stories.

2010

Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style I

emphasizes the development of (a) the capacity to understand and appreciate the varieties of prose through close analysis of a wide range of examples, and (b) the ability to write expository and other kinds of prose.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 1110.

2013

Twentieth Century Musicals

(same as Music 2013) is a survey of twentieth-century musical theatre. Selected works, presenting different styles and periods, will be examined in detail. There will be a strong, required listening/viewing component to this course. The ability to read music is not required. Music 2013 cannot be taken for credit by students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music program.

Notes:

  1. Credit for this course may not be applied to the Bachelor of Music degree.

  2. Credit can be received for only one of ENGL 2013, Music 3007, or Music 2013.

2020

Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style II

is a continuation of the work begun in ENGL 1110 and ENGL 2010.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1110 or ENGL 2010.

2030

Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style

- inactive course.

2031

Modern Canadian Fiction

- inactive course.

2110

Survey of English Literature I

- inactive course.

2111

Survey of English Literature II

- inactive course.

2120

Introduction to Tragedy

- inactive course.

2121

Introduction to Comedy

- inactive course.

2122

Introduction to World Literature in English

introduces students to the significant body of literature written in English that stands outside the dominant British/North American canon. The course emphasizes the teaching of various skills of research and essay writing including principles of documentation. Students will be required to complete a major research project and to write several shorter essays.

2150

Modern Canadian Fiction

is a study of representative Canadian fiction since 1930, including such authors as Ross, Buckler, Davies, Laurence, Atwood, Ondaatje and Findley.

2151

New Canadian Fiction

is a study of fiction of Canadian writers since the 1970s.

2160

North American Aboriginal Literature

will introduce aboriginal literature in a social, political and historical context. Beginning with the oral tradition (songs, narratives, legends, and orations), it will focus on different works by North American aboriginal writers: poetry, drama, short stories and novels.

2211

The English Novel from 1800-1900

is a study of representative English novels of the nineteenth century including works by such authors as Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, Thackeray, Gaskell, Eliot, Trollope and Hardy.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 2200.

2212

The Twentieth-Century British Novel

is a study of representative British novels of the twentieth century, including works by such authors as Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Waugh, Lessing and Murdoch.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 2201.

2213

The Twentieth-Century American Novel

is a study of representative American novels of the twentieth century, including such authors as James, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Morrison, Pynchon, DeLillo and Silko.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 2201.

2214

Nineteenth-Century American Fiction

is a study of representative American fiction of the nineteenth century including works by such authors as Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain and Chopin.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 2214 and 2215.

2250

Drama: Structure, Form and Practice

- inactive course.

2390

Introduction to Modern English Structures

is a practical introduction to the descriptive study of the English language with emphasis on syntax.

2400

History of the English Language to 1500

(same as Linguistics 2400) is a study of the early stages of the English Language: the Indo-European background; pronunciation and spelling, grammar, vocabulary and meaning in Old and Middle English.

Prerequisite: ENGL 2390 or Linguistics 2103

2401

History of the English Language from 1500 to Modern Times

(same as Linguistics 2401) is the English language since the Great Vowel Shift: sounds and grammar; standardization and varieties; eighteenth-century attitudes and nineteenth-century scholarship; semantic and lexical change.

Notes:

  1. Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 2401 and 3395.

  2. Students are urged to take ENGL 2400 before registering for ENGL 2401.

Prerequisite: English 2390 or Linguistics 2103.

2600

Introduction to Middle English

is a study of the language and literature of the later medieval period, excluding Chaucer.

2601

Introduction to Early Middle English

- inactive course.

2700

Writing and Gender I

requires students to investigate the construction of gender in a variety of fiction and non-fiction works, through journals, critical analysis, web discussion, presentations for peers on the themes of the course, and original fiction and non-fiction. Students will be expected to share most of their work with their peers. This course qualifies as a research and writing course.

2811

Science Fiction and Fantasy

introduces the literary sub-genres of science fiction and fantasy. It examines the traditional canonical backgrounds from which popular literatures derive, studies the formulaic patterns and explores the place of science fiction and fantasy in popular culture.

2812-2820

Special Topics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

2850

What is Film

is designed to introduce students to the medium of film. It is aimed at marking a shift from the natural enjoyment of movies to a critical understanding and to modes of film practice. Focus will be on the elements of film as components of cinematic style and meaning and on various approaches to the study of film.

2851

Introduction to Film Form and Film Theory

is concerned with developing visual literacy skills, while also providing terminology and theory necessary to critically engage film. Special attention is paid to film form, historical/social contexts for the production and reception of visual images, and the roles that progressive reproduction technologies, spectatorship, and seeing play in understanding our contemporary world through and beyond visual culture.

3001

Satire

is a study of satire from classical times, examining major forms of satiric expression such as the monologue, the parody and the long narrative.

3002

Medieval Books

(same as Medieval Studies 3000, History 3000, Religious Studies 3000) is an examination of the development and role of the manuscript book during the Middle Ages. Topics covered will include book production and dissemination; authors, scribes and audiences; and various kinds of books (e.g. glossed Bibles, anthologies, books of hours, etc.) and their uses.

Prerequisite: Medieval Studies 2000, 2001 or 2002 or permission of the instructor.

3003

English Studies

- inactive course.

3006

Women Writers in the Middle Ages

(same as Medieval Studies 3006 and Women's Studies 3001) will study selections from the considerable corpus of women's writings in the Medieval period, as well as issues which affected women's writing. All selections will be read in English translation.

3021

English Drama to 1580

is a study of the development of English drama from the Middle Ages to 1580. The course may also consider the popular arts, such as folk plays and mumming.

3022

Drama 1580-1642

is a study of the development of English drama (excluding Shakespeare) from 1580 to 1642.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 3022 and 4317.

3100

Practical Criticism

is a study of poetry through close reading and analysis to reveal meaning, methods, tone and technique.

3105

Issues in the Acquisition of English and the Adult Learner

(same as Linguistics 3105) focuses on selected issues in the grammatical, lexical, and pragmatic components of adult-learner English. Techniques of contrastive analysis, error analysis, performance analysis, and discourse analysis of corpora from adult English learners are presented and practised.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2390, 3650; Linguistics 2104; Education 2222; ENGL 2010 is recommended.

3120

Tragedy

- inactive course.

3121

Comedy

- inactive course.

3130

The English Novel to 1800

is a study of eighteenth-century English novels by such authors as Burney, Defoe, Fielding, Manley, Richardson, Sterne and Smollett.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: Students will have successfully completed two second-year English courses.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 3130 and the former ENGL 2210.

3152

Canadian Literature to 1918

is a study of the development of Canadian literature from its beginnings to the end of World War I.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 3145, 3147, or 3150.

3153

Canadian Literature, 1918-1945

- inactive course.

3155

Newfoundland Literature

is a study of Newfoundland literature with emphasis on representative writers since 1900.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 2155 and 3155.

3156

Modern Canadian Drama

is a study of a number of representative plays which illustrate the development of modern drama and theatre in Canada.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 3156 and 4307.

3157

Canadian Literature 1945-1970

is a study of the development of Canadian literature from 1945 to 1970.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 3146, 3148, 3151, or 3154.

3158

Canadian Literature 1970 to the Present

is a study of recent developments in Canadian literature.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 3146, 3148, 3151, or 3154.

3160

Empire and After: Introduction to Post-Colonial Writing

offers a broad overview of post-colonial studies in English. The course provides an introduction to key ideas in the field and a study of representative texts.

3161

Nation, Region, Identity: Studies in Post-Colonial Literatures

concentrates on examples of writing from within a single formerly colonized region, or nation, such as the Caribbean, Africa, the Indian sub-continent or Australasiai.

3171

Anglo-Irish Drama

- inactive course.

3172

Anglo-Irish Poetry

- inactive course.

3173

Anglo-Irish Prose

is a study of representative Anglo-Irish prose by such authors as Swift, Edgeworth, Stephens, Yeats, O'Casey, Joyce, Behan, Lavin, O'Connor, O'Flaherty and Moore.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 3170 or 4190.

3175

Irish Literature

is a study of major Irish writers such as Yeats, Joyce, O’Casey, Heaney, Friel and O’Brien.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed any of ENGL 3171 or 3172 or 3173.

3181

Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century

- inactive course.

3190

Scottish Literature

is a study of representative Scottish poetry and prose from the mid-eighteenth to the twentieth century including selected works by such writers as Boswell, Burns, Hogg, Scott, Galt, Stevenson, Conan Doyle, Buchan, MacDiarmid, Garioch and Muriel Spark.

3200

Shakespeare

is a study of six tragedies and romances such as Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, Macbeth, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest.

3201

Shakespeare

is a study of six comedies and histories such as Love's Labour's Lost, The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Henry V.

3260

American Drama

is a study of works by dramatists such as O'Neill, Rice, Maxwell Anderson, Sherwood, Williams, Hellman, Odets, Saroyan, Inge, Miller, Albee, Wilder and Kopit.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 3260 and 4308.

3302

Nineteenth-Century Drama

- inactive course.

3333

English Literature and Medical Humanities

focuses on the human condition and explores our biological, psychological and spiritual journeys of pain, suffering and death as revealed through literary texts. These texts vary among the literary genres of poetry, short stories, drama, novels, etc.

3350

Theatre

is an introduction to principles of directing and acting, through lectures, discussion and stage production. This course will have three hours of lectures and three hours of workshops.

3351

The Physical Stage and Video Technique

is an introduction to the fundamentals and vocabulary of design, lighting and stagecraft and film/video craft, including sound, properties, etc.

3460

Folklore and Literature

(same as Folklore 3460) will examine the interrelationships among folklore forms and literary genres, the influence of oral traditions on written literatures, and consider the theoretical issues raised by these interrelationships. The primary emphasis will be on the interpretation of literature from the perspective of folk tradition. Extensive reading, oral and written reports will be required.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both ENGL/Folklore 3460 and the former ENGL/Folklore 4450.

3500

Old English Language and Poetry

introduces students to the basic elements of Old English grammar and vocabulary through the practice of translating one or more poems from Old English into modern English and the study of the Old English poetic corpus in modern translations.

Notes:

  1. It is strongly recommended that students complete ENGL 2390 prior to taking this course.

  2. Students who have completed ENGL 250A/B cannot receive credit for either ENGL 3500 or ENGL 3501.

3501

Old English Language and Prose

- inactive course.

3600

Chaucer

is a study of representative poems.

3650

Structure of Modern English: Phonology and Morphology

is a study of standard English pronunciation and regional variations; stress intonation, terminal junctures; inflectional and derivational morphology. Informal speech and written English are compared.

3651

Structure of Modern English: Syntax

- inactive course.

3700

Introduction to Old Norse

- inactive course.

3710-3729

in English

(available only as part of the Harlow Campus Semester)

3811-3820 (Excluding 3813, 3816, 3817 and 3819)

Special Topics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

3813

Theories of National Cinema

examines films from various imperial, colonial, national and diasporic cinemas in the context of debates about what constitutes a national cinema. Students are normally expected to have taken at least one of English 2850 or English 2851.

3816

Television

is an introduction to the principles of acting for the camera through lecture, discussion and studio work.

Prerequisites: ENGL 3350 and 3351.

Note:

Admission priority will be given to students in Diploma in Performance and Communications Media.

3817

Writing and Gender II

explores differences related to gender in a wide variety of writing, not only in texts, but also in their production, reception and functions. All students are required to keep a journal, to share some of their writing with the class, and to participate in class discussions.

3819

The Gothic

offers an introduction to the Gothic mode, from its origins in Horace Walpole's novel. The Castle of Otranto (1764), to classic works like Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897), to move recent incarnations in novels, short fiction, and poetry. Among other things, this course will explore the Gothic's recurrent themes of sin, sex, violence, and religion, its subversive response to dominant cultures and historical contexts, and its philosophical roots in notions of sensibility, horror, and the sublime.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: 6 credit hours in English at the 2000-level

3830

Women Writers

is a course setting women writers in the context of literary history.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 2805, 3810, and 3830.

3840-3870

Special Topics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

3900

Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction

is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students' own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.

Notes:

  1. Students can receive credit for only two of ENGL 3900, 3901, and 3905.

  2. Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor's evaluation of the student's writing. Class size will be limited.

3901

Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry

is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students' own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.

Notes:

  1. Students can receive credit for only two of ENGL 3900, 3901, and 3905.

  2. Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor's evaluation of the student's writing. Class size will be limited.

3902

Introduction to Creative Writing: Playwrighting

is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary dramatic writing and the students’ own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.

Prerequisites: The regular prerequisites for 3000-level offerings, plus submission of a portfolio specified by the instructor and permission of the instructor.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 3902 and the former ENGL 3842.

3903

Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction

is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students’ own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.

Prerequisites: The regular prerequisites for 3000-level offerings, plus the submission of a portfolio specified by the instructor and permission of the instructor.

3910

Investigative Writing

will permit students to learn to draft and edit short investigative pieces; and they complete an article or essay, and an investigative project that attends to ethics guidelines, research, documentation, interviewing protocols, and writing and editing for a specific context. The course is conducted as a seminar using the students’ own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly. Some work may be done collaboratively.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s writing. Class size will be limited.

3911

Writing Satire

uses models of contemporary satire as a basis for students’ own work. Guest satirists will be invited to meet with students who will write satirical sketches, articles and/or plays based on their own experiences in response to current affairs and topical items of interest. Students will engage in at least one collaborative project.

Prerequisites: English 2010 or English 2020 (or equivalent).

3912

Song-Writing

uses models from early ballads to contemporary hits and near-misses as a basis for students’ own work. Guest song-writers will be invited to meet with students to discuss their compositions. Students will analyse song lyrics, write their own songs and collaborate on a major class project. The ability to sing or play a musical instrument or to read or write sheet music, while desirable, is not required.

Prerequisites: English 2010 or English 2020 (or equivalent).

3913

Write to Speak

develops the student’s ability to speak on all occasions, formal and informal, expected and unexpected. Students will deliver speeches of varying types and lengths on a regular basis throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: English 2010 or English 2020 (or equivalent).

3914

Professional Writing Online

is a web-based course designed to help students make the best use of electronic resources and to explore new possibilities for writing and publishing online.

Prerequisites: English 2010 or English 2020 (or equivalent).

3920

Reviewing

permits students to analyse and practice reviewing of three kinds: (a) performance; (b) film, TV video; c) books.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s writing. Class size will be limited.

4000

English Literature and History of Ideas I

is a study of European thought and culture as they affect the history and development of English literature from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 400A and 400B.

4001

English Literature and the History of Ideas II

is a study of European thought and culture as they affect the history and development of English literature from the eighteenth century to the present.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 400A and 400B.

4010

Literature, 1485-1600: Prose and Poetry

is a study of the literature of the English Renaissance, including Tudor humanism, Elizabethan prose fiction, and such writers as Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney and Spenser.

4030

British Literature, 1600-1660

is a study of selected works by such authors as Bacon, Donne, Jonson, Overbury, Browne, Herbert, Burton, Walton, Vaughan and the Cavalier poets.

4031

British Literature 1660-1700

is a study of selected works by such authors as Milton, Marvell, Clarendon, Bunyan, Evelyn, Pepys, Behn and Dryden.

4040

British Literature, 1700-1750

is a study of selected works by such representative authors as Addison, Steele, Defoe, Swift, Shaftesbury, Pope, Thomson and Young.

4041

British Literature, 1750-1790

is a study of selected works by such representative authors as Burke, Johnson, Boswell, Walpole, Gray, Collins, Cowper, Smart, Chatterton, Goldsmith and Sheridan.

Note:

Neither ENGL 4040 nor 4041 may be taken for credit by students who completed ENGL 404A and 404B.

4050

British Literature, 1790-1830

is a study of selected works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge and Hazlitt.

4051

British Literature, 1790-1830

is a study of selected works of Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb and De Quincey.

Note:

Neither ENGL 4050 nor 4051 may be taken for credit by students who completed ENGL 405A and 405B.

4060

Victorian Literature I

is a study of selected works by such writers as Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Brontës, Arnold, and Morris.

4061

Victorian Literature II

is a study of selected works by such writers as Dickens, Thackeray, Gaskell, George Eliot, Meredith, Trollope, and the Rossettis.

4070

British Literature, 1890-1920

is a study of representative writers such as Hardy, Wilde, Conrad, Housman, Forster, Edward Thomas, Owen, D. H. Lawrence, Mansfield, Virginia Woolf.

4071

British Literature, 1920-1945

is a study of representative writers such as Virginia Woolf, Eliot, Bowen, Orwell, Graham Greene, Auden, Empson, Waugh and Dylan Thomas.

4080

British Literature since 1945

is a study of representative writers of the period, such as Larkin, Murdoch, Hughes, Jennings, Geoffrey Hill, Powell, Pinter, Kingsley Amis and Ishiguro.

4100

Critical Theory I

is a survey of critical approaches to literature, from Plato to the end of the nineteenth century.

Note:

Students are advised to take this course towards the end of their program.

4101

Critical Theory II

is a survey of critical approaches to literature in the twentieth century.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 4101 and 4105. Students are advised to take this course towards the end of their program.

4210

Shakespeare's English History Plays

is a course for students who have completed ENGL 3200 or 3201. Plays studied: King John, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI, Richard III, Henry VIII.

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200 or 3201.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only two of ENGL 4210, 4211, and 4316.

4211

Shakespeare's Roman and Greek Plays

is a course for students who have completed ENGL 3200 or 3201. Plays studied: Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Troilus and Cressida, Coriolanus, Timon of Athens, Pericles, Cymbeline.

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200 or 3201.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only two of ENGL 4210, 4211, and 4316.

4251

American Literature to 1880

is a course on representative fiction, prose and poetry, including works by such authors as Edwards, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Whitman and Dickinson.

4260

American Literature from 1880 to 1928

traces the development of American literature from the closing of the frontier to the beginning of the Depression through the study of such writers as Adams, James, Crane, Dreiser, Cather, Robinson and Frost.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only three of ENGL 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270.

4261

American Literature from 1928 to 1945

concentrates on the study of American fiction, drama and poetry in the period between the two World Wars. The course includes such writers as Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, O'Neill, Stevens, Cummings and Hart Crane.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only three of ENGL 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270.

4270

American Literature Since 1945

is a study of representative writers of the period, such as Stevens, Lowell, Wilbur, Plath, McCullers, Bellow, Malamud.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only three of ENGL 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270.

4300

Modern Drama I

examines drama from Ibsen to the present day, principally of the realistic tradition, studied through representative plays.

Prerequisite: ENGL 2002 or permission of the Head of Department.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 3275 and 4300.

4301

Modern Drama II

is a study of twentieth-century developments: expressionism, surrealism, theatre of the absurd, studied through representative plays.

Prerequisite: ENGL 2002 or 4300 or permission of the Head of Department.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 4301 and 4305.

4302

Contemporary British Drama

is a study of representative dramatic works of contemporary British drama.

4400

Directing

is the analysis, production plans and execution of selected projects.

Prerequisites: ENGL 3350 and 3351 or permission of the instructor, in consultation with the Head of the Department.

4401

Producing the Play

is a full semester working with a selected play, to culminate in public performance. Students will be required to participate fully in all aspects of the production, except direction, which will be the responsibility of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL 3350 and 3351 or permission of the instructor, in consultation with the Head of the Department.

4402

Producing the Documentary

is a full semester working on a selected project, to culminate in the creation of a completed video. Students, working in groups established by the Program Co-ordinator, will be required to participate in all aspects of production.

Prerequisites: ENGL 3350, 3351 and 3816.

Note:

Admission priority will be given to students in Diploma in Performance and Communications Media.

4403

Etymology-History of English Words

- inactive course.

4420

English Dialectology I

(same as Linguistics 4420) is scope and applications of dialect study; history of English dialects; standard versus non-standard varieties; development of dialect study, especially linguistic geography; non-standard dialect and literature.

4421

English Dialectology II

(same as Linguistics 4421) is field-work and transcription; modern linguistic geography; structuralist dialectology; occupational dialects; other recent approaches.

Prerequisite: ENGL 4420.

4422

Stylistics

is a study of the main influences of language on literature. By far the most common kind of material studied is literary; attention is largely text-centred. The goal is not simply to describe the formal features of texts, but to show their functional significance for interpretation.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2390 and two third-year courses in English literature.

4500

Old English Language and Literature I

- inactive course.

4501

Old English Language and Literature II

- inactive course.

4600

Middle English Language and Literature I

- inactive course.

4601

Middle English Language and Literature II

- inactive course.

4800

Spenser and Milton

- inactive course.

4805

Blake

is a study of a selection of Blake's major writings.

4810-4819 (Excluding 4817)

Special Topics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

4817

Utopias and Dystopias in Literature

is a study of representative literary utopias and dystopias, both classic and modern.

Prerequisite: Two 3000-level English courses.

4821

Canadian Literature in Context I

- inactive course.

4822

Canadian Literature in Context II

is a study of some of the main concepts in Canadian culture since World War II as they affect the history and development of Canadian literature.

Prerequisite: Completion of three credit hours chosen from courses at the 2000 or 3000 level in Canadian literature, or permission of the instructor.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed ENGL 4820.

4850

Contemporary Canadian Poetry

is a seminar course in contemporary Canadian poetry. Students will have the opportunity to study collections by six English Canadian contemporary poets - not just new work by established older writers, but also first collections by younger writers. The work of poets from across Canada will be chosen.

Note:

Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 4850 and 3148.

Prerequisites: Two English courses at the 3000-level.

4851

Canadian Exploration Literature

will examine Canada’s early exploration and travel literature and show how it has shaped our contemporary fiction. Early texts may be studied from an anthology of exploration writings, such as Germaine Warkentin's Canadian Exploration Literature: An Anthology. Several contemporary novels will also be studied and may include Wayne Johnston's The Navigator of New York and John Steffler's The Afterlife of George Cartwright.

Prerequisite: Two English courses at the 3000-level.

4852-4860

Special Topics in Canadian Literature

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

4900

Bibliography I

is an introduction to methods needed for advanced study of English: aspects of literary detection; studies in the material form of the book, from sheep or tree to finished product; a guide to the editing of books.

4901

Bibliography II

- inactive course.

4910

Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

is a seminar for students who wish to write publishable literary fiction. Class size will be limited. Students will be expected to produce at least 15,000 words during the semester. Regular participation is also required.

Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL 3900 with a grade of 70 or higher and submission of a portfolio and permission of the instructor.

4911

Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

uses models of contemporary writing and the students' own work. This course is designed to develop further the technical skill of those students who have reached a high level of achievement in the introductory creative writing course in poetry, English 3901 (or who have a body of work of exceptional accomplishment) and to help them move towards publication in literary journals and chapbooks.

Prerequisites: Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor's evaluation of the student's writing and on the achievement of a minimum grade of 70% in ENGL 3901 or ENGL 3900.

4912

Advanced Creative Writing: Playwrighting

is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students’ own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one Creative Writing course at the 3000-level, plus a portfolio specified by the instructor and permission of the instructor.

4913

Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction

is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students’ own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one Creative Writing course at the 3000-level, plus submission of a portfolio specified by the instructor and permission of the instructor.

4914

Advanced Editing

is editing for the workplace: An intensive course in drafting and editing. Students will be expected to work both individually and collaboratively.

Prerequisites: Normally, students will (a) be enrolled in the Diploma in Professional Writing and (b) have successfully completed at least two of the following: ENGL 3001, 3817, 3903 (or other course designated Creative Writing), 3910, 3920. Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s writing. Class size will be limited.

4920-4930

Special Topics in Creative Writing

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

4999

Essay for Honours Candidates

is required as part of the Honours program.

5000

Instructional Field Placement

is a 6 credit hour course which occurs upon completion of course work in the Diploma in Performance and Communications Media. The curriculum emphasis is on the application of acquired skills. Continuing the project-oriented structure built into the practical courses, students will be placed with existing projects in the professional communities of film, television, theatre or video.

Prerequisites: ENGL 3350, 3351, 3816, 4400, 4401, 4402, with an overall average of 65% in these courses.

Note:

Restricted to students in Diploma in Performance and Communications Media. Admission is by application to the Program Co-ordinator, normally at least three months before the beginning of the placement, and is limited to students who at the time of admission have completed the six courses listed above with an overall average of at least 65% and who already hold a first degree or are in their final year of a degree program as confirmed by the Office of the Registrar. Credit for this course can be used only towards the Diploma in Performance and Communications Media.

5100

ESL Instructional Field Placement

is a 6 credit hour practicum consisting of classroom observation, group discussion of observations, one-to-one tutoring and classroom teaching practice. Participation in a weekly discussion group and submission of preliminary and final reports are required.

Prerequisite: ENGL 3105 or Linguistics 3105.

5200

Instructional Field Placement in Professional Writing

is a 6 credit hour course which has students, upon completion of the courses in the Diploma in Professional Writing (18 credit hours), placed in work-place environments where they will contribute under supervision to the planning, drafting and editing of documents.

Prerequisites: Completion of the six courses in the program, with an overall average of 65% in these courses.