Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Arts (2010/2011)
8.6 Classics
8.6.1 Programs and Regulations

Programs of the Department of Classics are designed to acquaint students with the ancient Greek and Roman cultures from which Western Civilization has developed. The Department endeavours to instruct with and utilize the full range of evidence available, including texts in Greek and Latin as well as material culture. Furthermore, it is understood that a degree of access can often be achieved by studying antiquity through translated sources. The Department therefore is committed to offering a wide range of courses and programs designed to explore the many aspects of the discipline.

8.6.2 General Degree
8.6.2.1 Major in Classics

Candidates for a Major in Classics are advised to choose their program in consultation with the Department.

The major program consists of a minimum of 39 credit hours in Classics courses in accordance with the following:

  1. Either Classics 1120 and 1121 or Classics 1130 and 1131

  2. At least 15 credit hours must be at the 3000 level or above

  3. An additional 18 credit hours at any level. With the exception of first year language courses, no more than two 1000-level courses may be counted towards the major.

8.6.2.2 Minor in Classics

Students wishing to pursue a minor in Classics will take 24 credit hours in Greek and Roman Studies courses. In place of any of these the student may substitute courses in Greek or Latin.

8.6.2.3 Honours in Classics

Candidates for Honours in Classics shall consult the Department before finalizing their program.

  1. Classics 1120 and 1121 and Classics 1130 and 1131;

  2. At least 9 credit hours selected from Classics 2200, 2300, 3200, and 3300;

  3. Classics 4999;

  4. At least 36 additional credit hours in Classics at the 3000 level or above, of which 18 must be in Latin or Greek. Classics 2302 may be substituted for a course at the 3000 level.

8.6.2.4 Joint Honours in Classics

Classics may be combined with another subject to form a Joint Honours program. The Joint Honours Program in Classics shall include at least 51 credit hours in Classics, including the following.

  1. Classics 1120 and 1121 or Classics 1130 and 1131;

  2. At least 6 credit hours selected from Classics 2200, 2300, 3200, and 3300;

  3. At least 30 additional credit hours in Classics at the 3000 level or above, of which at least 15 must be in Greek or Latin. Classics 2302 may be substituted for courses at the 3000 level.

8.6.2.5 Honours in Greek and Roman Studies

Candidates for Honours in Greek and Roman Studies shall consult the Department before finalizing their program.

  1. One of following: Classics 1050, 1051, 1052, 1100 or 1200;

  2. Either a. or b.:

    1. Classics 1120 and 1121

    2. Classics 1130 and 1131

  3. 15 credit hours in courses at the 2000 level;

  4. 36 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or above, including 4999.

8.6.2.6 Joint Honours in Greek and Roman Studies

Greek and Roman Studies may be combined with another subject to form a Joint Honours program. The Joint Honours Program in Greek and Roman Studies shall include at least 51 credit hours in Classics.

  1. One of following: Classics 1050, 1051, 1052, 1100 or 1200;

  2. Either a. or b.:

    1. Classics 1120 and 1121

    2. Classics 1130 and 1131

  3. 15 credit hours in courses at the 2000 level;

  4. 27 credit hours in courses at the 3000 level or above.

8.6.3 Prerequisites

Note:

Although there are no formal prerequisites for any course in Greek and Roman Studies, students are encouraged to ensure that they have adequate preparation for the courses numbered above 3000 in which they intend to register.

  1. Classics 3200 is the normal prerequisite for any Latin course in the 4000 series.

  2. Classics 3300 is the normal prerequisite for any Greek course in the 4000 series.

In special circumstances, prerequisites may be waived with the permission of the Head of the Department.

Medieval Studies 3000 may be substituted for a Greek and Roman Studies course in both the Classics degree programs (Honours, Joint Honours and general degree) and the Greek and Roman Studies degree programs (Honours, Joint Honours and general degree).

8.6.4 Course Descriptions

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Classics courses are designated by CLAS.

8.6.4.1 Greek Course Descriptions

1130

Elementary Ancient Greek I

is an introduction to the grammar and syntax of ancient Greek, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition, and aural comprehension.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 1130 and the former CLAS 130B.

1131

Elementary Ancient Greek II

is a continuation of the work begun in Elementary Ancient Greek I.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 1131 and the former CLAS 130B.

Prerequisite: CLAS 1130 or its equivalent.

2300

Intermediate Ancient Greek

is a continuation of the grammar, syntax, reading, and composition completed in the elementary program.

Prerequisite: CLAS 1131.

2302

Readings in New Testament Greek

(same as Religious Studies 2302).

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 2302 and Religious Studies 2302.

3300

Advanced Ancient Greek

refines the skills developed in Intermediate Greek and applies them to selected readings of Greek authors.

Prerequisite: CLAS 2300

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 3300 and the former 2305.

4300

Greek Tragedy

4305

Greek Comedy

4310

Greek Epic Poetry

4315

Attic Orators

4320

Greek Lyric Poetry

4325

Greek Historians

4340

Greek Philosophical Authors

4355-4365

Special Topics in Greek Readings

will have authors and readings selected by the Department.

4370

Hellenistic Poetry

4391

Special Authors

4999

Honours Essay

is a requirement of the Honours program.

8.6.4.2 Latin Course Descriptions

1120

Elementary Latin I

is an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Latin, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition, and aural comprehension.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 1120 and the former CLAS 120A.

1121

Elementary Latin II

is a continuation of the work begun in Elementary Latin I.

Prerequisite: CLAS 1120 or its equivalent.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 1121 and the former CLAS 120B.

2200

Intermediate Latin

is a continuation of the grammar, syntax, reading, and composition completed in the elementary program.

Prerequisite: CLAS 1121.

3200

Advanced Latin

refines the skills developed in Intermediate Latin, and applies them to selected readings of Latin authors.

Prerequisite: CLAS 2200.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 3200 and the former CLAS 2205.

4202

Medieval Latin

same as Medieval Studies 4021)

4205

Latin Lyric Poetry

4210

Latin Historians

4215

Latin Orators

4220

Latin Hexameter Poetry

4225

Latin Epistolography

4235

Latin Philosophical Authors

4240

Latin Drama

4245

Latin Elegiac Poetry

4250

Latin Satire

4265-4275

Special Topics in Latin Readings

will have authors and readings selected by the Department.

4291

Special Authors

4999

Honours Essay

is a requirement of the Honours program.

8.6.4.3 Greek and Roman Studies Course Descriptions

Note:

For the following courses, no knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Students are strongly advised to have completed at least one 1000-level or 2000-level Greek and Roman Studies course before registering in any 3000-level or higher Greek and Roman Studies course.

1051

Gods in Classical Mythology

is an introduction to some of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome, with particular attention to the gods. The myths will be studied with reference to their social and historical contexts, literary and artistic representations, and modern theories of interpretation.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for both CLAS 1051 and the former CLAS 1050.

1052

Heroes in Classical Mythology

is an introduction to some of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome, with particular attention to the heroes. The myths will be studied with reference to their social and historical contexts, literary and artistic representations, and modern theories of interpretation.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for both CLAS 1052 and the former CLAS 1050.

1100

Introduction to Greek Civilization

is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of Ancient Greek Civilization. The course introduces the student to Greek social and political institutions, religion and myth, and achievements in art, philosophy, science and literature, as well as the influence of Ancient Greece on the modern world.

Note:

This course may qualify as a Research/Writing course.

1200

Introduction to Roman Civilization

is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of Ancient Rome. The course introduces the student to social, political, and legal institutions, the growth of the Roman Empire, Roman art, literature, and religions, as well as Rome's pervasive influence in the modern world.

Note:

This course may qualify as a Research/Writing course.

2010

Greek Art and Architecture

is an introduction, through illustrated lectures, to the study of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece.

2015

Roman Art and Architecture

is an introduction, through illustrated lectures, to the study of the art and architecture of Ancient Rome.

2020

History of the Hellenistic World

is a survey of the history of the Mediterranean world and the Near East from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC until the incorporation of the Kingdom of Egypt in the Roman Empire in 30 BC. Particular attention is given to the influence of the new monarchies on political, social and cultural developments in both Greek and non-Greek communities.

2025

Introduction to Ancient History

(same as History 2020) is an introduction to the history of ancient city-states, kingdoms and empires, including economic, social, political and cultural developments.

2035

History of Classical Greece

(same as History 2035) is a survey of Greek History from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great, with special reference to the social and political institutions of the fifth century B.C.

2041

History of the Roman Republic

(same as History 2041) is a survey of Roman history from the early monarchy to the death of Julius Caesar, with special reference to the society and politics of the late Republican period.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 2041, History 2041, and the former CLAS/History 2040.

2042

History of the Roman Empire

(same as History 2042) is a survey of Roman history from the death of Julius Caesar to the rise of Constantine, with special reference to the society and politics of the early Imperial period.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS 2042, History 2042, and the former CLAS/History 2040.

2055

Women in the Ancient World

is an examination of the role of women in ancient Mediterranean civilizations from the perspectives of social and political history and culture. Critical assessments of relevant scholarship and methodologies will be included.

2400

Literature of Ancient Greece

introduces students to Greek Literature from the Archaic to the Imperial Periods. Students will study epic poetry, drama and other genres typical of these periods. Students will also be introduced to important themes, methodologies and scholarship. This course may be offered as a research/writing course. Consult each semester’s Undergraduate Registration Procedures for the R/W designation.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for Classics 2400 and Classics/English 3110.

2500

Literature of Ancient Rome

introduces students to Latin Literature from the Republican to the Late Antique Periods. Students will study epic poetry, drama and other genres typical of these periods. Students will also be introduced to important themes, methodologies and scholarship. This course may be offered as a research/writing course. Consult each semester’s Undergraduate Registration Procedures for the R/W designation.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for both Classics 2500 and Classics/English 3111.

2701

History of Ancient Philosophy

(same as Philosophy 2701) is a survey of the origin and development of Western philosophy among the Greeks and Romans.

2900

Science and Technology in the Ancient World

is an introduction to significant developments in ancient Greek and Roman science and technology with emphasis on interpreting the primary evidence, including written sources (in translation) and material remains, assessing the historical context, and considering the nature of advancements.

3010

Greek Religion

(same as Religious Studies 3010) is a study of the role of religion in the private and public life of the Greek world.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS/Religious Studies 3010 and the former CLAS/Religious Studies 3121.

3020

Roman Religion

(same as Religious Studies 3020) is a study of the role of religion in the private and public life of the Roman world.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for CLAS/Religious Studies 3020 and the former CLAS/Religious Studies 3121.

3030

Greece and Persia

is a study of relations between Greece and Persia from the foundation of the Persian Empire to the death of Alexander the Great.

3040

Socrates and Athens

is an introduction to and examination of Socrates within the context of Athenian political, social, cultural, intellectual, and religious life, and against the background of the fifth-century enlightenment and the sophistic movement.

3050

Augustus and Rome

is a course that examines the Age of Augustus (27 B.C. to A.D. 14) which witnessed not only Rome's greatest achievements in literature and art but also the replacement of republican government by a monarchy; this course, based on original sources, examines the period through its most powerful and influential figure.

3150

Early Christian Thought: The First Five Centuries

(same as Religious Studies 3150) is an advanced study of selected themes and personalities in Christian thought and literature from the second to the sixth centuries. Particular attention will be given to the controversies centring on the doctrines of the Trinity and the Person of Christ.

3270

Christianity and the Roman Empire

- inactive course.

3405

Tragic Drama in Greece and Rome

is a detailed examination of the tragic dramas of ancient Greece and Rome. A selection of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Seneca will be read in English translation. Topics to be discussed include the development of ancient tragedy, its literary, performative and thematic traditions, its representation of social and historical conditions, and its influence on later tragic drama.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for Classics 3405 and the former Classics 2805.

3410

Comic Drama in Greece and Rome

is a detailed examination of the comic dramas of ancient Greece and Rome. A selection of plays by Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence will be read in English translation. Topics to be discussed include the development of ancient comedy, its literary and thematic traditions, its representation of social and historical context, and its influence on later comic drama.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for Classics 3410 and the former Classics 2810.

3415

Epic Poetry in Greece and Rome

offers a detailed and in-depth study of the epic poetry or ancient Greece and Rome. The course will examine the poems of Homer, Apollonius of Rhodes and Virgil in English translation. Instructors may include additional poems. Topics to be discussed include the development of epic poetry, its literary traditions and its role in Greek and Roman society.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for Classics 3415 and the former Classics 2060.

3420

Lyric Poetry in Greece and Rome

is a study of Greek and Roman poetry often conventionally termed ‘lyric’, including such genres as choral and solo songs, elegy, epigram, love poetry, and others. A selection of important works from Archaic Greece to Augustan Rome will be studied with reference to their social and literary contexts.

3500-3510

Special Topics in Classics

will have topics determined by the Department.

3580

Bronze Age Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean

- inactive course.

3600

Ancient Myth and Cult

(same as Religious Studies 3600) develops the students’ knowledge of myth and material culture by examining specific religious sites in the Greek and Roman world as foci of ritual practice. Students will learn to integrate knowledge of the physical remains with the literary and ritual evidence in order to obtain a more integrated understanding of religious life in ancient Greece and Rome.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for Classics 3600 and Religious Studies 3600.

3700

The Ancient World in Film

examines the representation of the history and cultures of the ancient world in film. A selection of films will be studied and extensive reference will be made to the ancient evidence which informs them. The ancient world’s impact on modern Western society will be considered together with the film industry’s recasting of the ancient world in response to modern social and historical developments.

3710-3729

Special Topics in Classics

(available only as part of the Harlow campus semester)

3900

Greek and Roman Medicine

examines the medical theories and practices of the ancient Greek and Roman world by taking account of ancient texts (in translation) as well as evidence from material culture, including art and architecture. Topics may include the relationship between science and medicine, concepts of health and illness, the role of the healer, practical applications, gender differentiation of patients, and legacy of ancient practices.

4000

Seminar in Greek History and Society

- inactive course.

4010

Seminar in Roman History and Society

is a seminar in Roman History and Society.

4020

Seminar in Greek Literature and Culture

is a seminar in Greek Literature and Culture.

4030

Seminar in Roman Literature and Culture

is a seminar in Roman Literature and Culture.

4100-4109

Special Topics in Greek and Roman Studies

will have topics announced by the Department and may include field studies in topography, Greek and Roman art and architecture, archaeology, and related areas, to be held in the Mediterranean and other regions of Graeco-Roman influence.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Head of the Department.

4999

Honours Essay

is a requirement of the Honours program.