Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Arts (2009/2010)
8.27 Political Science
8.27.1 Organization of Courses

Political Science 1000 provides an introduction to the study of politics, power, law, public policy and government. Courses at the 2000-level offer an introduction to major fields and can be taken beginning in a student's first year of study. Courses at the 3000-level usually assume that students have completed at least two courses in Political Science including the corresponding 2000-level introductory course. At the 4000-level, courses are advanced seminars with small enrollment caps, and therefore have formal prerequisites.

The second digit in each course number designates a field in Political Science. Students interested in notionally concentrating in an area may be guided in their course selections, as follows:

  • Second Digit
  • 0 General & Research techniques
  • 1 Political theory
  • 2 International politics
  • 3 Comparative politics
  • 6 Public policy and public administration
  • 8 Canadian politics
  • 9 Special topics
  • All Political Science courses are designated by the abbreviation POSC.
8.27.2 Previous Calendar Regulations

In accordance with UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - Year of Degree and Departmental Regulations - Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Science, candidates for a Political Science Honours, Majors or Minor who had completed a 2000-level course or above in Political Science prior to September 2009 will normally follow the departmental regulations in effect at that time. For those students, POSC 2800 may be substituted for 2710; one of POSC 2100, 2600 or 3810 may be substituted for 2711; 3011 need not apply; and prerequisites for 4000-level courses (except POSC 4010, 4011, 4600) may be substituted with at least 12 credit hours in Political Science including at least 6 credit hours at the 3000-level. Such students may instead elect to follow the degree regulations outlined in this version of the Calendar. A student who, prior to September 2009, had completed both of POSC 1010 and 1020 but who had not yet completed a 2000-level course or above in Political Science, is exempted from the 1000 requirement. In all other cases, such as Minors, the corresponding renumbered course will apply (e.g., POSC 2100 for 2000, 2800 for 2710).

8.27.3 Honours in Political Science
  1. An Honours degree provides students with additional research and writing skills, may be required for admission to a graduate program, and may be useful preparation for law and other professional fields. Students considering the Honours program are encouraged to apply before their fourth semester and to begin considering a potential Honours research topic before their seventh semester. Admission to the program is in accordance with UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS and the Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Arts.

  2. In addition to meeting the general requirements for the degree, candidates for a B.A.(Hons.) in Political Science must complete at least 60 credit hours in courses offered by the Department, including:

    1. POSC 1000 ;

    2. a minimum of 15 credit hours at the 2000-level, which must include POSC 2010, 2100, 2800, and a minimum of two of POSC 2200, 2300, 2600;

    3. a minimum of 36 credit hours at the 3000-level or above, which must include;

      1. a minimum of 18 credit hours at the 3000-level, which must include POSC 3010, a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 32xx or 33xx, and a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 36xx or 38xx; and,

      2. a minimum of 15 credit hours at the 4000-level, which must include POSC 4010, 4011.

        Notes:

        1. No more than one of POSC 1010 or 1020 can be included among the 60 Political Science credit hours required for an Honours degree.

        2. For Honours, Philosophy 3870 and 3890 may be substituted for 3000-level Political Science credit hours (31xx), and Women's Studies 4005 may be substituted for 4000-level Political Science credit hours (41xx). No other such substitutions may apply.

  3. Candidates for an Honours degree are required to select courses as specified under Honours in Political Science. A possible course pattern is presented in Table 1: Course Pattern for an Honours in Political Science.

    Table 1: Course Pattern for an Honours in Political Science

    Year

    Political Science Courses (POSC)

    Credit Hours

    1 (Fall)

    POSC 1000

    3

    1 (Winter)

    POSC 2010, 2800

    6

    2 (Fall & Winter)

    POSC 2100 and two of 2200, 2300 or 2600

    One of POSC 36xx or 38xx

    12

    3 (Fall & Winter)

    POSC 3010 and five other 3000-levels (at least one of 32xx or 33xx)

    One POSC course at the 4000-level

    21

    4 (Fall)

    POSC 4010

    Two other POSC courses at the 4000-level

    9

    4 (Winter)

    POSC 4011

    Two other POSC courses at the 3000- or 4000-levels

    9

  4. Prior to enrolling in POSC 4010, all Honours students should review the Guidelines Governing Honours Essays available from the Head of the Department, and are required to follow these guidelines while enrolled in POSC 4010 and 4011.

  5. Students electing Joint Honours are required to complete at least 51 credit hours in Political Science, including POSC 2010, and including 42 credit hours chosen in accordance with the pattern set out in the degree regulations for a Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Political Science. If the candidate chooses to complete the Honours Essay (POSC 4010 and 4011) in Political Science, it must be passed with a grade of 70% or better.

8.27.4 Major in Political Science
  1. In addition to meeting the general requirements for the degree, candidates for a B.A. with a Major in Political Science must complete at least 42 credit hours in courses offered by the Department, including:

    1. POSC 1000;

    2. a minimum of 12 credit hours at the 2000-level, which must include: POSC 2100, 2800 and a minimum of two of 2200, 2300, 2600;

    3. a minimum of 15 credit hours at the 3000-level, which must include: POSC 3010, a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 32xx or 33xx, and a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 36xx or 38xx; and,

    4. a minimum of 9 credit hours at the 4000-level.

      Notes:

      1. No more than one of POSC 1010 or 1020 can be included among the 42 Political Science credit hours required for a Major.

      2. POSC 2010 is a recommended choice for a Major.

      3. For a Major, Philosophy 3870 and 3890 may be substituted for 3000-level Political Science credit hours (31xx), and Women’s Studies 4005 may be substituted for 4000-level Political Science credit hours (41xx). No other such substitutions may apply.

  2. Candidates for a Major degree are required to select courses as specified under Major in Political Science. A possible course pattern is presented in Table 2: Course Pattern for a Major in Political Science.

    Table 2: Course Pattern for a Major in Political Science

    Year

    Political Science Courses (POSC)

    Credit Hours

    1 (Fall)

    POSC 1000

    3

    1 (Winter)

    POSC 2010, 2800 (POSC 2010 is a recommended choice)

    6

    2 (Fall & Winter)

    POSC 2100 and two of 2200, 2300 or 2600

    One of POSC 36xx or 38xx

    12

    3 (Fall & Winter)

    POSC 3010 and three other 3000-levels (at least one of 32xx or 33xx)

    12

    4 (Fall & Winter)

    Three 4000-level POSC courses

    9

8.27.5 Minor in Political Science
  1. Candidates for a Minor in Political Science must complete at least 24 credit hours in courses offered by the Department, including:

    1. POSC 1000;

    2. a minimum of 6 credit hours at the 2000-level, which must include POSC 2800; and

    3. a minimum of 12 credit hours at the 3000-level or above, which must include at least 3 credit hours at the 4000-level.

      Notes:

      1. No more than one of POSC 1010 or 1020 can be included among the 24 POSC credit hours required for a Minor.

      2. POSC 2010 and 3010 are recommended choices for a Minor.

      3. For a Minor, credit hours in another discipline may not be substituted for POSC credit hours.

  2. Candidates for a Minor are required to select courses as specified under Minor in Political Science. A possible course pattern is presented in Table 3: Course Pattern for a Minor in Political Science.

Table 3: Course Pattern for a Minor in Political Science

Year

Political Science Courses (POSC)

Credit Hours

1 (Fall)

POSC 1000

3

1 (Winter)

POSC 2800

3

2 (Fall & Winter)

POSC 2010 (POSC 2010 is a recommended choice)

One of POSC 2100, 2200, 2300 or 2600

6

3 (Fall & Winter)

POSC 3010 (POSC 3010 is a recommended choice)

One POSC course at the 3000-level

6

4 (Fall & Winter)

One POSC course at the 3000-level

One POSC course at the 4000-level

6

8.27.6 Political Science Advice and Website
  1. Candidates for an Honours, a Major or a Minor in Political Science may consult with the Head of the Department or its Undergraduate Advisor to receive advice on Political Science course selections. As part of their non-Political Science electives, Honours or Major candidates may consider courses with associated content offered by other departments, such as Economics, History, Philosophy, Sociology, or Women’s Studies. Related university programs or certificates of interest may include Aboriginal studies, Canadian Studies, Criminology, European studies, Law and Society, Newfoundland and Labrador studies, Public Administration and Police Studies.

  2. The Department's website at www.mun.ca/posc features details about upcoming course offerings, course instructors, the undergraduate (Honours, Major, Minor) and graduate (Master of Arts) programs, work internships, studying abroad opportunities, special events, frequently asked questions, and more. In the event of conflicting information, the official University Calendar and information issued by the Office of the Registrar shall take precedence.

8.27.7 Course Prerequisites
  1. The following prerequisite schedule applies to Political Science courses.

    1. All research techniques courses POSC 2010, 3010, 4010, 4011 have prerequisites specified in their descriptions.

    2. 1000-level: No prerequisites. Suitable for students in all disciplines.

    3. 2000-level: Except for POSC 2010, no prerequisites. Completion of POSC 1000 is generally recommended.

    4. 3000-level: Except for POSC 3010, no prerequisites. Completion of a corresponding 2000-level area introduction course is generally recommended as outlined under Table 4: Recommended Course Sequencing by Student's Area of Interest.

    5. 4000-level: Prerequisites are specified in course descriptions. Completion of at least 12 credit hours in Political Science, including 6 at the 3000-level, is generally recommended.

  2. Anticipated completion of an introductory course is generally recommended prior to enrolling in a corresponding course at the next level. Students following this path may opt to take courses in the same area in the same academic year (e.g., if a 2000-level course is completed in Fall then a corresponding 3000-level course may be taken in Winter). This is presented, for illustrative purposes only, in Table 4: Recommended Course Sequencing by Student’s Area of Interest.

Table 4: Recommended Course Sequencing by Student’s Area of Interest

Political Theory

International Politics

Comparative Politics

Public Policy and Administration

Canadian Politics

Overview Course

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

Area introduction

POSC 2100

POSC 2200

POSC 2300

POSC 2600

POSC 2800

Area specialization

POSC 31xx

POSC 32xx

POSC 33xx

POSC 36xx

POSC 38xx

Advanced seminar

POSC 41xx

POSC 42xx

POSC 43xx

POSC 46xx

POSC 48xx

With the written consent of the course instructor and the Head of the Department, certain prerequisite requirements may be waived.

8.27.8 Course Descriptions

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department or view the website at www.mun.ca/posc.

Enrollment in Political Science courses is limited. First priority is given to students registered as an Honours, Major or Minor in Political Science. During this time other students may be temporarily placed on a wait list.

Political Science courses are designated by POSC.

1000

Introduction to Politics and Government

is an introduction to basic concepts in the study of politics, power, law, public policy and government, touching on major areas of political ideologies, institutions, and current domestic and international political issues. Suitable for students in all disciplines seeking an introduction to Political Science.

1010

Issues in Canadian Politics

explores some of Canada’s most pressing and interesting political issues. This course profiles important political problems facing federal and provincial politicians and society. Suitable for students in all disciplines who have an interest in Canadian politics and who wish to develop a basic awareness of Canadian government.

1020

Issues in World Politics

explores some of the world’s most pressing and interesting political issues. This course profiles important political problems, such as a power struggle within a particular country, a controversial topic that affects an entire continent, or a major crisis that has implications for inhabitants around the world. Suitable for students in all disciplines who have an interest in international politics.

2010

Research and Writing in Political Science

provides an overview of the research and analysis skills used in Political Science. Students can expect to learn about library research, electronic data gathering, and the elements of strong essay writing which can be applied across disciplines in the social sciences. The “political” content will vary by instructor and will address more specific topics than those ordinarily covered in 2000-level Political Science courses. This course qualifies as a Research/Writing course.

Prerequisite: POSC 1000

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 2010 and the former POSC 2500

2100

Introduction to Political Theory

is a survey of the most important political thinkers and schools of political thought. The course will ordinarily cover major political thinkers and include a selection of contemporary political ideologies.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 2100 and the former POSC 2000

2200

Introduction to International Politics

is an examination of the "building blocks" of international politics including determinants, means, processes and ends. Emphasis is on the post-1945 period.

2300

Introduction to Comparative Politics

is an introduction to comparative politics and techniques of comparative analysis across political jurisdictions. This course focuses on the differences between, and similarities among, a variety of countries and systems of government.

2600

Introduction to Public Policy and Administration

outlines major concepts in, and issues relating to, the fields of public policy and administration. Examines and assesses government organization and decision-making. Topics may also include social, economic and health policy.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 2600 and the former POSC 3540

2800

Introduction to Canadian Politics and Government

is an introduction to the structure and operations of institutions of Canadian government and the nature of political actors. Topics to be examined may include the constitution, federalism, parliament, political parties, political culture and elections.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 2800 and the former POSC 2710

2990

Europe in the Twentieth Century

is a pre-Harlow course which examines the social, economic and political history of Europe from World War I to the present. It examines the shift from war and depression to peace and prosperity. Examining the rise and demise of fascism and communism, postwar reconstruction, and Europe’s changing position in the world, this course explores the interplay between domestic and international politics and Europe’s position in the international order.

Notes:

  1. Recommended for Political Science students considering a Harlow semester, exchange programs in Europe, or further courses in European politics.

  2. Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 2990, European Studies 2000, History 2350, the former POSC 2350.

3010

Empirical Methods in Political Science

is an introduction to basic concepts in the scientific approach to studying politics, and provides students with the fundamental skills for conducting empirical research using both qualitative and quantitative methods. These skills include how to construct a research project, and how to collect and analyze information.

Prerequisites: POSC 2010 or another Research/Writing course, and enrollment in the Political Science Honours, Major or Minor program.

3100

Political Theory from Plato to Rousseau

examines selected political theory from Plato to Rousseau. The theme of the course is the development of liberal democratic theory.

3110

Political Theory from Tocqueville to Present

examines selected political theory from Tocqueville to the present. The theme of the course is the crisis in liberal democratic theory.

3140

Feminist Political Theory

examines feminist scholarship that has challenged previously accepted notions in political theory, including definitions of politics itself, the distinctions between public and private, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. This course considers different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, examining theses such as gender and democracy, race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

3210

International Law

is an introduction to international law concerned with the interaction of the political and legal systems. Topics discussed are sources, agreements, membership, recognition, territory, jurisdiction, immunities, state responsibility, and force and war.

3220

International Organizations

examines the origins, structures and roles of international organizations as both ‘arenas’ in which states pursue their interests and ‘evidence’ of an embryonic international society. The focus will be primarily on the workings of the United Nations, especially its ‘collective security’ function, and other regional security organizations.

3250

International Political Economy

studies the interaction between world politics and international economics. Major theoretical debates regarding globalization and multinational corporations are covered, as well as current topics such as: the politics of the global monetary and financial order, international trade, foreign investment and debt, international development, and environmental issues.

3280

Canadian Foreign Policy

is an introduction to the analysis of foreign policy, with special reference to domestic and international constraints, capabilities and ideology.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3280, the former POSC 3200, and the former POSC 3760

3290

Human Security

examines political concepts and government policies related to security contexts, such as the displacement of citizens, food supply issues, energy, information flows, and the environment.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3290 and the former POSC 3391

3300

European Politics

is a comparative study of government and politics in selected states of Western Europe. Emphasis will be on parties, institutions, and policy-making, particularly the ways in which states manage their economies.

3305

Irish Politics

introduces students to the politics of the Republic of Ireland. Topics covered include the historical origins of the state, the political influence of the Roman Catholic Church, the evolution of political institutions, as well as the evolving relationship with Northern Ireland, Europe and the world.

3310

American Politics

examines the governmental process in the United States including the role of parties and interest groups. This course will also consider select contemporary problems.

3315

Latin American Politics

is an analysis of the forces influencing politics in contemporary Latin America with particular emphasis being given to those factors promoting political change. No prior knowledge of Latin America is assumed.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3315 and the former POSC 3430

3325

South Asian Politics

analyzes the history and development of political change in a selection of South Asian states with a focus on the contemporary challenges that they face in a globalized political environment.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3325 and the former POSC 3420

3340

Women and Politics

examines the role of women in the political process in comparative context. Topics may include the political socialization, organization, and recruitment of women; voting behaviour; and the organization of governmental institutions as a response to the concerns of women.

3350

Public Opinion and Voting

looks at the measurement and formation of political attitudes, factors affecting attitude stability and change, and the distribution of opinion in society. Emphasizes public opinion and voting behaviour in the United States and Canada during campaigns and inter-election periods.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3350 and the former POSC 3510

3390

Political Parties

is a study of political parties in liberal democracies. Attention is given to the origin and development of parties, how they organize, multiparty competition and what difference parties make. Political parties in Europe, the United States, and Canada are considered in a comparative context.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3390 and the former POSC 3531

3600

Public Policy in Canada

is an examination of the relationship between public policy development in Canada and changes in the social and economic policy environment.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3600 and the former POSC 4790

3610

Public Administration in Canada

is an introduction to public administration, history of the public service in Canada, an examination of the structure and functioning of contemporary federal and provincial governments. Topics covered include cabinet organization, financial and personnel management, collective bargaining, and bilingualism.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3610 and the former POSC 3741

3620

Law and Society

reviews traditional theories about law, discuss their inadequacies, and consider the benefits of a policy-oriented approach to the study of the role of law in society. The concept of law as a process of authoritative decision will be used to examine the function of the judicial authority.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3620 and the former POSC 3521

3650

Canadian Political Economy

introduces students to major debates about the role of the state in Canadian economic development and public policy. Topics may include: the challenges of natural resource dependency, regionalism, globalization, and the relationship between Canada and the United States.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3650 and the former POSC 3751

3681

Corrections Policy in Newfoundland and Labrador

examines how various political, social and economic forces have helped shape correctional policy and practice in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3681 and the former POSC 3791

3800

Federalism in Canada

examines relationships between government in the Canadian federation ranging from high-profile disputes to efficient diplomacy. This course reviews longstanding intergovernmental stresses such as the constitution, legislative powers, legal matters, sub-state nationalism (e.g., Quebec, Newfoundland, Labrador) and wealth distribution.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3800 and the former POSC 3710

3810

Political Executive in Canada

explores executive institutions and the roles of political actors, such as prime ministers, premiers and ministers, in addressing and shaping important political issues in Canada.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3810 and the former POSC 2711

3820

Constitutional Law in Canada

uses a casebook approach to examine critical issues of Canadian constitutional law. The development of the Canadian Constitution and processes of judicial review, as well as the legal development of federalism and protection of civil rights, are examined in detail.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3820 and the former POSC 3720

3830

Aboriginal Government and Politics in Canada

is an introductory course in Aboriginal governance. It examines Aboriginal culture and traditions, the variety of Aboriginal governments and governing traditions, and Aboriginal and treaty rights. Public policy issues surrounding categories of Aboriginal peoples, intergovernmental relations affecting them, and the role and significance of Aboriginal political organizations and actions are explored.

3860

Media and Politics in Canada

draws upon communications theory to analyze major political problems and processes. Specific attention is given to Canadian politics in the news and to various print, broadcast and online media.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3860 and the former POSC 3511

3870

Provincial Politics

is a comparative study of politics in selected Canadian provinces and territories. Consequences of varying historical and cultural contexts will be examined with special attention to parties and movements, leadership styles, and orientations to the Canadian federation.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3870 and the former POSC 3770

3880

Newfoundland and Labrador Politics

is a study of the political process in Newfoundland and Labrador. Topics may include electoral behaviour and attitudes, the party system, leadership styles, the consequences of federalism, and public administration.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3880 and the former POSC 3780

3890

Municipal Politics

is an examination of the theory, structure and operation of local governments in Canada, with particular emphasis on Newfoundland and Labrador. Recent proposals for reform and the politics of implementing regional government and financial reorganization will be examined.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 3890 and the former POSC 3790

3900-3979

Special Topics in Political Science

will have topics announced by the Department.

Note:

Credit restrictions will be designated on a course-by-course basis.

3980-3999

Special Topics in European Politics

is offered only at the Harlow (England) campus and explore selected facets of the politics of contemporary Europe. Typical themes include the European Union and its member-states, asylum and immigration, social and economic policy, foreign policy and the position of Europe in the international system. For further information about the Harlow semester consult the Department or the Faculty of Arts.

Note:

Credit restrictions will be designated on a course-by-course basis.

4010

Honours Essay I

develops independent research and writing skills through regular meetings with a research supervisor, the preparation of an approved research proposal, and the completion of a high quality draft of at least one section of the Honours essay. Students are expected to follow the Department’s “Guidelines Governing Honours Essays”. Prior to enrolling, and ideally a semester in advance, students should contact the Head of the Department to identify a potential supervisor.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honours program and permission of the Head of the Department.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4010 and the former POSC 4950

4011

Honours Essay II

builds on skills developed in POSC 4010, requires students to complete the writing of their Honours essay, including submitting a high quality complete draft at the midpoint of the semester, with the final complete document to follow soon afterwards. Students are expected to meet regularly with their research supervisor and to follow the Department’s “Guidelines Governing Honours Essays”.

Prerequisite: Completion of POSC 4010 with a minimum grade of 70%.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4011 and the former POSC 4951

4100

Approaches to Political Theory

is an introduction to the interpretation of political texts. Features historical and hermeneutical approaches to the study of Political Science.

Prerequisites: POSC 3100 or 3110, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4100 and the former POSC 4611

4110

Multicultural Citizenship

examines political theorists’ interpretations and assessments of democracy and multiculturalism.

Prerequisite: POSC 3100 or 3110, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4110 and the former POSC 3793

4120

Contemporary Democratic Theory

examines alternative conceptions of the foundations of democracy. Theorists to be considered include Dworkin, Hayek, Nozick, Rawls, and Walzer.

Prerequisites: POSC 3100, or 3100, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4120 and the former POSC 4113

4200

International Law and Politics

is a research seminar on contemporary Canadian legal problems. Each semester will focus on one problem, such as Northern sovereignty, pollution, fishing zones or control of the sea.

Prerequisite: POSC 2200 and at least one POSC 32xx course, or POSC 3210, or the instructor’s permission.

4210

Arms Control and Proliferation

examines the evolution of arms control and considers the consequences of success and failure.

Prerequisite: POSC 2200 and a POSC 32xx course, or the instructor's permission.

4215

Human Rights and International Politics

examines the evolution of global norms of human rights and consequences for the structures of the international system, international civil society, and the international political process.

Prerequisites: POSC 2200 and a POSC 32xx course, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4215 and the former Law and Society 3300

4230

Theories of International Relations

examines the major theories used to understand world politics and international conflict, such as constructivism, feminism, game theory, historical structuralism, liberalism, and realism. These are explored through classic readings in international relations and case studies.

Prerequisites: POSC 2200 and a POSC 32xx course, or the instructor's permission.

4250

The European Union

is an examination of the European Community as an emergent transnational form of governance. The course will consider the origins of the Community, the operation of its institutions, its transformation from Common Market to European Union, and the ways in which EC politics impinges on national-level politics.

Prerequisites: POSC 2200 and a POSC 32xx course, or POSC 3300, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4250 and the former POSC 3291

4255

Controversies in Political Economy

examines current political and public policy challenges from a political economy perspective. Topics may include globalization, major trade disputes, currency and debt crises, economic development and global environmental problems.

Prerequisites: POSC 2200 and a POSC 32xx course, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4255 and the former POSC 4350

4280

American Foreign Policy

reviews the structures, process and major foreign policy perspectives of the United States of America in a global context.

Prerequisites: POSC 2200 and a POSC 32xx course, or POSC 3310, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4280 and the former POSC 3200

4310

Comparative Federalism

examines theories of federalism along with the development and operation of federalism in selected nation states.

Prerequisites: POSC 2300 and a POSC 33xx course, or POSC 3800, or the instructor’s permission.

4330

Comparative Political Institutions

studies the relationship between political institutions and political outcomes. Topics will address the origin, evolution, demise and consequences of political institutions in a variety of western and non-western contexts.

Prerequisites: POSC 2300 and a POSC 33xx course, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4330 and the former POSC 4313

4340

Women and Mass Politics

focuses on the gender gap in both political behaviour and participation. Focusing primarily on Canada and the United States, this course assesses patterns of involvement in political institutions, and examines differences between men’s and women’s political attitudes.

Prerequisites: POSC 2300 and a POSC 33xx course, or POSC 3140 or 3340, or the instructor’s permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4340 and the former POSC 4503

4360

Contentious Politics - Protest, Violence and Terrorism

examines protest and movement politics, insurgent and counter-insurgent politics, terrorism, and revolution.

Prerequisites: POSC 2300 and a POSC 33xx course, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4360 and the former POSC 4740

4370

Democracy and Democratization

is a comparative study of the conditions necessary to develop and sustain democratic regimes and the circumstances under which transitions to democracy succeed or fail. The course will examine theoretical materials and apply them to recent and historical transitions to democratic rule.

Prerequisites: POSC 2300 and a POSC 33xx course, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4370 and the former POSC 4301

4380

The Developing World

considers the practical and theoretical issues that affect the chances of the over five billion inhabitants of the developing world to secure democratic governance and material well-being.

Prerequisites: POSC 2300 and a POSC 33xx course, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4380 and the former POSC 4450

4600

Public Policy Work Internship

provides career-related policy work experience with government, a political party, a non-governmental organization, a union, or another employer involved in public affairs. Job placements are for twelve weeks at eight hours per week and are typically unpaid. Class meetings and course work are required. Admission is selective and competitive. Details are available on the Department's website at www.mun.ca/posc.

Prerequisites: a minimum 60 credit hours, including at least 15 credit hours in Political Science courses with a minimum 70% average, and permission of the instructor.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4600 and the former POSC 4000

4630

Policy Analysis

is a survey of the major frameworks for the study of public policy, including decision-making theories. The course examines different stages in the policy-making process, such as policy initiation, priorities planning, choice of governing instruments, implementation and evaluation in relation to the objective and normative factors in Canadian policy environment, key institutions, dominant interests, and political leadership.

Prerequisites: POSC 2600 and a POSC 36xx course, or POSC 3600, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4630 and the former POSC 3730

4650

Public Policy in Resource Dependent Economies

examines the political economy of Canada’s human and natural resources, such as labour, energy, fisheries, forestry, mining, and water. The political consequences of natural resource dependency on the environment and Aboriginals are also discussed.

Prerequisites: POSC 2600 and a POSC 36xx course, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4650 and the former POSC 4731

4680

Public Policy in Newfoundland and Labrador

is a study of public policy in Newfoundland and Labrador. Examines the formation, implementation and impact of policies in one or more of the following areas: fisheries, resources, industrial development, agriculture, social policy.

Prerequisites: POSC 2600 and a POSC 36xx course, or POSC 3600 or 3880, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4680 and the former POSC 4730

4860

Elections in Canada

is an examination of election campaigns and electoral systems in the Canadian political system, with an emphasis on candidates, parties, voters, electioneering activities and campaign regulations.

Prerequisites: POSC 2800 and a POSC 38xx course, or POSC 3350, 3390, or 3860, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4860 and the former POSC 3700

4870

Regionalism in Canada

is an examination of the economic, social, and institutional determinants of regionalism and the ways in which these forces have shaped decision-making in Canada. Emphasis on the various models and frameworks used to study regionalism.

Prerequisites: POSC 2800 and a POSC 38xx course, or POSC 3800 or 3870, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4870 and the former POSC 4750

4880

Research in Newfoundland and Labrador Politics

requires students to participate in advanced research projects dealing with selected aspects of the politics of Newfoundland and Labrador. Topics to be considered may include the legislature and the executive, the civil service, interest groups, parties, elections and political recruitment.

Prerequisites: POSC 2800 and a POSC 38xx course, or POSC 3880, or the instructor's permission.

Note:

Credit may be obtained for only one of POSC 4880 and the former POSC 4780

4900-4990

Special Topics in Political Science

(excluding 4950, 4951) will have a seminar topic announced by the Department.

Credit Restriction and Prerequisite: Designated on a course-by-course basis.