Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Arts (2008/2009)
7.24 Political Science
7.24.1 Organization of Courses

Political Science courses are divided into four levels to assist students in making an orderly progression in their study of various fields within the discipline.

  1. Political Science 1000, 1010, and 1020 are basic courses introducing students to the study of politics. Political Science 1000 and 1010 place particular emphasis on Canadian Politics while Political Science 1020 stresses international issues. Any two of these courses are recommended to students interested in knowledge and skills useful for understanding politics and government and the context in which political decisions are made.

  2. Courses at the 2000 level are designed to introduce the student to the Major areas within the discipline of Political Science: Political Theory (x0xx), (x1xx); International Politics (x2xx); Comparative Politics (x3xx), (x4xx); Political Behaviour (x5xx); and Canadian Politics (x7xx). These courses raise questions, survey substantive knowledge, and introduce methodological approaches useful to students going on to more advanced courses in these fields. Taken together these courses serve as a foundation for a Major program in Political Science. Individually, they are open to all students interested in exploring specific aspects of Political Science.

  3. 3000-level courses deal with a wide range of topics in depth, and assume some previous knowledge of appropriate areas of Political Science or related disciplines.

  4. 4000-level courses are advanced seminars, either bringing together several approaches or fields of knowledge within the discipline, or focussing on specific problems.

7.24.2 Prerequisites
  1. No prerequisites will apply to Political Science courses unless specified. Students, however, are encouraged to ensure that they have adequate preparation for courses in which they intend to register.

  2. Since Political Science 2710 and one of Political Science 2200 or 2300 are required for all majors, and 2710 is required for minors, it is strongly recommended that these courses be taken no later than in a student's second year.

  3. Students should complete at least 6 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '2' before registering in a course with the initial digit '3'.

  4. Students should complete at least 6 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '3' before registering in a course with the initial digit '4'.

  5. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with their faculty advisor prior to registration in each semester.

7.24.3 Requirements for General Degree
  1. To qualify for a B.A. degree with a Major in Political Science, a student must, in addition to meeting the general requirements, complete at least 42 credit hours in courses offered by the Department, including:

    1. Political Science 1000, 1010, or 1020 are recommended as first courses for any student interested in majoring in Political Science. No more than two of these courses may be counted toward the 42 credit hours in Political Science required for a Major.

    2. Students must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours in courses at the 2000-level including Political Science 2710 and 2711, and Political Science 2200 or 2300; and

    3. a minimum of 24 credit hours in courses numbered 3000 or above including at least 6 credit hours in courses at the 4000 level.

    Note:

    First year history courses provide an important foundation for students majoring in Political Science. The Department recommends that majors and prospective majors take introductory history courses in their first year of study.

  2. A Minor program in Business Administration is available for Political Science majors. For details, see the regulations for the Faculty of Business Administration.

7.24.4 Honours Program

An Honours degree may be required for admission to post-graduate programs in Political Science, and may be useful preparation for law and other professional fields. Students considering an Honours program are encouraged to apply to the Department early, preferably during their third or forth terms. Students are admitted to the Political Science Honours Program in accordance with University and Faculty of Arts Honours Degree regulations. To qualify for the B.A.(Hons.) Degree in Political Science, a student must complete at least 60 credit hours in courses offered by the Department.

  1. Political Science 1000, 1010, or 1020, are recommended as first courses for any student majoring in Political Science. No more than two of these courses may be counted toward the 60 credit hours in Political Science required for an Honours degree.

  2. Students must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours in courses at the 2000-level including Political Science 2010 or 2500, Political Science 2710 and 2711, and Political Science 2200 or 2300;

  3. Political Science 3010, 3011 and 3100 and

  4. At least 15 credit hours in courses numbered 4000 and above, including Political Science 4950 and Political Science 4951 (Honours Essay l and ll)

Students must follow the Guidelines Governing Honours Essays provided in Political Science 4950 and available from the Head of the Department.

7.24.5 Requirements for Minors

To qualify for a Minor in Political Science, a student must complete at least 24 credit hours in courses offered by the Department.

  1. Political Science 1000, 1010, or 1020 are recommended as first courses for any student interested in completing a minor in Political Science. No more than two of these courses may be counted toward the 24 credit hours in Political Science required for a Minor.

  2. Students must complete Political Science 2710 and at least one of Political Science 2000, 2010, 2200, 2300, or 2500; and

  3. At least 12 credit hours in courses numbered 3000 or above including at least 3 credit hours in courses at the 4000 level.

7.24.6 Faculty Advising

Students who intend to Major or Minor in Political Science must inform the Head of the Department. Each Major student is assigned a Faculty Advisor, who is responsible for planning with the student an overall program, and for approving a course program for each term. The Department stresses the importance of regular consultation between student and Faculty Advisor as the most effective way to assure a rational and relevant academic program within the broad outlines of the University and Departmental regulations.

7.24.7 Course Descriptions

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Political Science courses are designated by POSC.

1000

Introduction to Politics

is an introduction to basic concepts in the study of politics, emphasizing the Canadian system of government and its relationship with the Canadian society.

1010

Canadian Political Problems

is the analysis of the operation of the Canadian political system through close examination of three selected policy problems, such as poverty in Canada, Canadian-United States relations and French Canada.

1020

World Political Problems

is an introduction to contemporary issues in world politics. The course will examine selected issues and the manner in which these reflect interests and ideologies and the larger political and economic context in which they occur.

2000

Introduction to Political Thought

is a survey of the most important political thinkers and schools of political thought in the Western political tradition. The course will ordinarily cover political thinkers from Plato to Marx and include a selection of contemporary political ideologies.

2010

Power, Democracy, and Politics

examines the relationship between power and democracy. Focussing on the role of the citizen in politics, it introduces students to research and writing in political science. Questions to be considered: Who counts? Who is in charge? What difference does it make? This course qualifies as a Research/Writing course.

2200

Introduction to International Politics

is an examination of the "building blocks" of international politics including determinants, means, processes and ends. Emphasis is on the post-1945 period.

2300

Introduction to Comparative Politics

is an introduction to comparative politics focussing on the differences and similarities among a variety of countries and systems.

2350

Europe in the 20th Century

(same as European Studies 2000 and History 2350) examines the social, economic, and political changes from 1918 to the present including the collapse of monarchies, the emergence of mass politics, fascism and totalitarianism, World War II, postwar reconstruction and the welfare state, European integration, and Europe in the postwar economic and political order. The course will examine Britain, France, Germany, and Italy, and particularly the European Union. Special attention will be paid to the demise of class politics and the impact of postwar affluence.

2500

Introduction to Political Behaviour

is an introduction to classics and controversies in the understanding of political behaviour. Topics include political culture and individual behaviour, public opinion, voting and elections, political participation, psychological dimensions of activism, and social movements. Besides regular lectures, several workshops are planned to encourage students' participation. This course qualifies as a Research/Writing course

2710

Introduction to Canadian Politics I

is an introductory survey of the structure, operation, and inter-relationships of the institutions of government at the federal level in Canada. Topics to be examined include the constitution, federalism, parliament, the executive, and the judiciary.

2711

Introduction to Canadian Politics II

is an introductory survey of the Canadian political process. The course will explore the linkages between Canadian society and political institutions. Topics to be examined include political culture, political parties, the electoral system, voting behaviour, interest groups, the mass media and politics, protest movements, and elites and social classes.

3010

Qualitative Interview Techniques in Political Science

is an introduction to applied qualitative research in Political Science. A learning-by-doing approach is adopted. At the beginning of the semester, a common research project is proposed. Students collect their own original data and analyse them with appropriate software. This intensive form of investigation is presented as a component of the scientific research process.

3011

Survey Techniques in Political Science

is an introduction to applied quantitative research in Political Science. A learning-by-doing approach is adopted. Moving from the data collected in POSC 3010, students learn how to construct survey research instruments, conduct a random survey and analyse the data with appropriate software. A final report integrates the data collected with the various components of the scientific method.

Prerequisite: POSC 3010.

3100

Political Theory I

examines selected political theory from Plato to Rousseau. The theme of the course is the development of liberal democratic theory.

Prerequisite: Any 2000 level course in Political Science.

3110

Political Theory II

examines selected political theory from Tocqueville to the present. The theme of the course is the crisis in liberal democratic theory.

Prerequisite: Any 2000 level course in Political Science.

3140

Feminist Political Theory

- inactive course.

3190-3194

Special Topics in Political Theory

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

3200

Comparative Foreign Policy

is an introduction to the comparative analysis of foreign policy, with special reference to selected great powers.

3210

International Law

is an introduction to international law concerned with the interaction of the political and legal systems. Topics discussed are sources, agreements, membership, recognition, territory, jurisdiction, immunities, state responsibility, and force and war.

3220

International Organizations

examines the purposes, structures, and effectiveness of contemporary international organizations. Emphasis will be placed on the United Nations "family". An exposure to several others of the more than two hundred existent IGO's will also be given.

3250

International Political Economy

studies the interaction between world politics and international economics. Major theoretical debates regarding globalization and multinational corporations are covered, as well as current topics such as: the politics of the global monetary and financial order, international trade, foreign investment and debt, international development, and environmental issues.

3291

The European Union

is an examination of the European Community as an emergent transnational form of governance. The course will consider the origins of the Community, the operation of its institutions, its transformation from Common Market to European Union, and the ways in which EC politics impinges on national-level politics.

Prerequisite: POSC 2200 or 2300.

3292-3296

Special Topics in International Relations

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

3300

European Politics

is a comparative study of government and politics in selected states of Western Europe. Emphasis will be on parties, institutions, and policy-making, particularly the ways in which states manage their economies.

Prerequisite: POSC 2300.

3310

American Politics

will examine the governmental process in the United States including the role of parties and interest groups. It will also examine select contemporary problems.

Prerequisite: Any 2000 level course in Political Science.

3320

Russian Politics

- inactive course.

3340

Women and Politics

examines the role of women in the political process in comparative context. Topics may include the political socialization, organization, and recruitment of women; voting behaviour; and the organization of governmental institutions as a response to the concerns of women.

3370-3389

Special Topics in Contemporary European Politics

are offered only at the Harlow (England) campus and explore selected facets of the politics of contemporary Europe. Typical themes include the European Union and its member-states, asylum and immigration, social and economic policy, foreign policy and the position of Europe in the international system. For further information about a Harlow semester consult the Department of Political Science or the Faculty of Arts.

3391-3395

Special Topics in Comparative Politics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

3410

African Politics

- inactive course.

3420

Asian Politics

- inactive course.

3430

Latin American Politics

is an analysis of the forces influencing politics in contemporary Latin America with particular emphasis being given to those factors promoting political change. No prior knowledge of Latin America is assumed.

3510

Public Opinion

- inactive course.

3511

Media and Politics

draws upon communications theory to analyse major political problems and processes. Specific attention is given to Canadian politics in the news and to various print, broadcast and online media.

3521

Law and Society

will review traditional theories about law, discuss their inadequacies, and consider the benefits of a policy-oriented approach to the study of the role of law in society. The concept of law as a process of authoritative decision will be used to examine the function of the judicial authority.

3531

Political Parties

is a study of political parties in liberal democracies. Attention is given to the origin and development of parties, how they organize, multiparty competition and what difference parties make. Political parties in Europe, the United States, and Canada are considered in a comparative context.

Prerequisite: POSC 2010 or 2300 or 2500 or 2711.

3540

Principles of Public Administration

is an outline of major theoretical concepts in the field of public administration. The emphasis is on organization theory and practice, administrative decision-making, and organization development. Usually run as a seminar course. This course is relevant to any student contemplating a career in public employment.

3590-3594

Special Topics in Political Behaviour

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

3700

Elections in Canada

is an examination of election campaigns and electoral systems in the Canadian political system, with an emphasis on candidates, parties, voters, electioneering activities and campaign regulations.

3710

Intergovernmental Relations in Canada

examines relationships between governments in the Canadian federation range from high-profile disputes to efficient diplomacy. This course reviews longstanding intergovernmental stresses such as the constitution, legislative powers, legal matters, sub-state nationalism (e.g., Quebec, Newfoundland, Labrador) and wealth distribution.

3711

Fiscal Federalism in Canada

- inactive course.

3720

Canadian Constitutional Law

uses a casebook approach to examine critical issues of Canadian Constitutional Law. The development of the Canadian Constitution and processes of judicial review, as well as the legal development of federalism and protection of civil rights, are examined in detail.

3730

Introduction to Policy Analysis

is a survey of the major frameworks for the study of public policy, including decision- making theories. The course examines different stages in the policy-making process, such as policy initiation, priorities planning, choice of governing instruments, implementation and evaluation in relation to the objective and normative factors in Canadian policy environment, key institutions, dominant interests, and political leadership.

3741

Public Administration in Canada

is an introduction to public administration, history of the public service in Canada, an examination of the structure and functioning of contemporary federal and provincial governments. Topics covered include cabinet organization, financial and personnel management, collective bargaining, and bilingualism.

3751

Canadian Political Economy

introduces students to major debates about the role of the state in Canadian economic development and public policy. Topics may include: the challenges of natural resource dependency, regionalism, globalization, and the relationship between Canada and the United States.

3760

Canadian Foreign Policy

will discuss the factors which contribute to the making of Canadian Foreign Policy and the process by which it is made. Several case studies will be discussed, for example: Canada and the international law of the fisheries; Canada and NATO; Canada and peacekeeping.

3770

Provincial Politics

is a comparative study of politics in selected Canadian provinces. Consequences of varying historical and cultural contexts will be examined with special attention to parties and movements, leadership styles, and orientations to the Canadian federation.

3780

Newfoundland Politics

is a study of the political process in Newfoundland. Topics may include electoral behaviour and attitudes, the party system, leadership styles, the consequences of federalism, and public administration.

3790

Local Government and Politics in Canada

is an examination of the theory, structure and operation of local governments in Canada, with particular emphasis on Newfoundland. Recent proposals for reform and the politics of implementing regional government and financial reorganization will be examined.

3791-3795

Special Topics in Canadian Politics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

4000

Internship

provides career-related work experience with government, a political party, a non-governmental organization, a union, or another employer involved in public affairs. Job placements are for 12 weeks at eight hours per week and are typically unpaid. Class meetings and course work are required. Admission is selective and competitive. Details are available on the Department’s Web site.

Prerequisites: 15 credit hours in Political Science courses with a minimum B(70) average and third-year standing (minimum 60 credit hours).

4113

Contemporary Democratic Theory

- inactive course.

4200

Special Topics in International Law

is a research seminar on contemporary Canadian legal problems. Each semester will focus on one problem, e.g., Northern sovereignty, fishing zones, pollution, control of the sea.

4210-4219

Special Topics in International Politics

are in-depth research of timely international concerns. Each semester the emphasis will be on a specific crisis situation, such as the Mid-East conflict or topical problems of disarmament, foreign aid, or trade relationships.

4230

Theories of International Relations

examines the major theories used to understand world politics and international conflict, such as: constructivism, feminism, game theory, historical structuralism, liberalism, and realism. These are explored through classic readings in international relations and case studies.

4301

Transitions to Democracy

is a comparative study of the conditions necessary to develop and sustain democratic regimes and the circumstances under which transitions to democracy succeed or fail. The course will examine theoretical materials and apply them to recent and historical transitions to democratic rule.

Prerequisites: POSC 2300, plus one Political Science course numbered at the 3000 level.

4310

Comparative Federalism

will examine theories of federalism along with the development and operation of federalism in selected nation states.

4313

The Politics of Contemporary Welfare States

- inactive course.

4350

Controversies in Political Economy

examines current political and public policy challenges from a political economy perspective. Topics may include: globalization, major trade disputes, currency and debt crises, economic development and global environmental problems.

4390-4395

Special Topics in Comparative Politics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

4450

Third World Politics

- inactive course.

4460

Refugees and Politics

- inactive course.

4500-4505

Special Topics in Political Behaviour

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

4604-4613 (Excluding 4608)

Special Topics in Political Science

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

4620-4624

Directed Readings in Political Science

will have the readings announced by the Department.

4708-4719

Special Topics in Canadian Politics

is an analysis in depth of a particular aspect of Canadian government and politics.

4730

Public Policy in Newfoundland

is a study of public policy in Newfoundland. Examination of the formation, implementation and impact of policies in one or more of the following areas: fisheries, resources, industrial development, agriculture, social policy.

4731

Political Economy of Newfoundland

- inactive course.

4740

Contentious Politics: Protest, Violence and Terrorism

examines protest and movement politics, insurgent and counter-insurgent politics, terrorism, and revolution.

4750

Regionalism in Canadian Politics

is an examination of the economic, social, and institutional determinants of regionalism and the ways in which these forces have shaped decision-making in Canada. Emphasis on the various models and frameworks used to study regionalism.

4770

Politics in Atlantic Canada

- inactive course.

4780

Research Seminar in Newfoundland Politics

requires students to participate in research projects dealing with selected aspects of Newfoundland politics. Topics to be considered include the legislature and the executive, the civil service, interest groups, parties, elections and political recruitment.

4790

Public Policy in Canada

is an examination of the relationship between public policy development in Canada and changes in the policy environment. Policy areas to be studied include economic growth and stabilization, social security, economic regulation, criminal justice, education, human rights, and cultural survival and development.

4950

Honours Essay I

requires students to prepare a research proposal and drafts of at least one section of the honours essay. Students writing the honours essay are expected to meet regularly with their supervisor and to participate in occasional colloquia on research design.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: Permission of the Head of the Department.

4951

Honours Essay II

requires students to complete the writing of their honours essay. Students writing the honours essay are expected to meet regularly with their supervisor and to participate in occasional colloquia on their research.

Prerequisites: Completion of POSC 4950 with a minimum grade of 70%.