Office of the Registrar
Sir Wilfred Grenfell College (2007/2008)
11.20 Mathematics and Statistics

REGULATIONS

At most 9 credit hours in Mathematics will be given for courses completed from the following list subject to normal credit restrictions: 1000, 1031, 1050, 1051, 1080, 1081, 1090, 1150, 1151.

102F, 103F and 104F

Mathematics Skills Program

are non-credit courses intended for those students who either have a weak background in mathematics or are returning to the subject after some years. The program enables students to master mathematical operations such as those involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, integers, exponents, linear equations, algebraic and rational expressions, formulas, graphs, systems of linear equations, basic trigonometry, exponents and radicals, and quadratics.

1000

Calculus I

is an introduction to differential Calculus including logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions.

Three hours of lecture per week and one and one-half hour laboratory period per week.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1090 or a combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the department.

Note:

Effective Winter 2000, the credit restriction between Mathematics 1000 and Mathematics 1080 has been lifted. However, credit cannot be obtained for both Mathematics 1000 and Mathematics 1081.

1001

Calculus II

is an introduction to integral Calculus with applications. In addition to three lectures per week there will be a one and one-half hour problem lab.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 1081.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for both Mathematics 1001 and either Engineering 1411 or Engineering 2413.

1050

Finite Mathematics I

covers topics which include sets, logic, permutations, combinations, and elementary probability.

Three hours of lecture per week and a one and one-half hour laboratory period per week.

Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department above, or Mathematics 103F.

Notes:

  1. With the exception of those already admitted at the time of registration in this course to a B.Ed. program that requires this course, students who already have obtained credit for 6 or more Mathematics credit hours numbered 2000 or above are not permitted to register for this course nor can they receive credit for it.

  2. Credit cannot be obtained for Mathematics 1050 and the former Mathematics 1150.

1051

Finite Mathematics II

covers topics which include elementary matrices, linear programming, elementary number theory, mathematical systems and geometry.

Three hours of lecture per week and a one and one-half hour laboratory period per week.

Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department (See regulation 1) above), or Mathematics 103F.

Notes:

  1. With the exception of those already admitted at the time of registration in this course to a B.Ed. program that requires this course, students who already have obtained credit for 6 or more Mathematics credit hours numbered 2000 or above are not permitted to register for this course nor can they receive credit for it.

  2. Credit cannot be obtained for Mathematics 1051 and the former Mathematics 1151.

1090

Algebra and Trigonometry

(F and W)

provides students with the essential prerequisite elements for the study of an introductory course in calculus. Topics include algebra, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, polynomials, and rational functions.

Three hours of lecture and a three hour laboratory period per week.

Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the department or Mathematics 104F.

Note:

Students will not receive credit for Mathematics 1090 if they have previously received credit or are currently registered for Mathematics 1000, 1001, 1080, or 1081.

2000

Calculus III

is a study of the differential calculus of functions of two variables, an introduction to convergence of infinite sequences and series. In addition to three lectures per week there will be a one and one-half hour problem lab.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1001.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for both Mathematics 2000 and any of Engineering 1411, Engineering 1412, Engineering 2412, Engineering 2413.

2050

Linear Algebra I

includes the topics of Euclidean n-space, vector operations in 2- and 3-space, complex numbers, linear transformations on n-space, matrices, determinants, and systems of linear equations.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 6 credit hours in first year Mathematics courses.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for both Mathematics 2050 and Engineering 2402.

2051

Linear Algebra II

includes the topics of real and complex vector spaces, basis, dimension, change of basis, eigenvectors, inner products, and diagonalization of Hermitian matrices.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2050.

2090

Mathematics of Finance

covers the following topics: simple and compound interest and discount, forces of interest and discount, equations of value, annuities and perpetuities, amortization schedules and sinking funds, bonds and other securities, contingent payments.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1001.

2320

Discrete Mathematics

are basic concepts of mathematical reasoning, sets and set operations, functions, relations including equivalence relations and partial orders as illustrated through the notions of congruence and divisibility of integers, mathematical induction, principles of counting, permutations, combinations and the Binomial Theorem.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1001 or 2050.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for both Pure Mathematics 2320 and Computer Science 2740.

2500

Statistics for Business and Arts Students

is descriptive statistics (including histograms, stem-and-leaf plots and box plots), elementary probability, discrete random variables, the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, sampling distribution, estimation and hypothesis testing including both one and two sample tests, paired comparisons, chi-square test, correlation and regression. Related applications.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 6 credit hours in first year courses in Mathematics or registration in at least semester 3 of a B.N. program or permission of the head of department.

Note:

Credit can be obtained for only one of Statistics 2500, 2510, 2550, and Psychology 2900. Normally offered twice a year, including the fall. Statistical computer package will be use in the laboratory, but no prior computing experience is assumed.

2550

Statistics for Life Science Students

is an introduction to basic statistics methods with an emphasis on applications to life sciences and, in particular, to biology. Material includes descriptive statistics, elementary probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling distribution, estimation and hypothesis testing (both one and two sample cases), chi-square test, one way analysis of variance, correlation and simple linear regression.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 1081.

Note:

Credit can be obtained for only one of Statistics 2500, 2510, 2550, and Psychology 2900. Statistical computer package will be used in the laboratory, but no prior computing experience is assumed.

3000

Real Analysis I

(F and W)

is proof techniques, structure of R, sequences, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation.

Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2000.

Note:

Credit can be obtained for only one of Mathematics 3000 and the discontinued 2001.

3202

Vector Calculus

is functions of several variables, Lagrange multipliers, vector valued functions, directional derivatives, gradient, divergence, curl, transformations, Jacobians, inverse and implicit function theorems, multiple integration including change of variables using polar, cylindrical and spherical co-ordinates, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem, divergence theorem, line integrals, arc length.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2000 and 2050.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for both Applied Mathematics/Pure Mathematics 3202 and Physics 3810.

3260

Ordinary Differential Equations I

is direction fields, equations of first order and first degree, higher order linear equations, variation of parameters, methods of undetermined coefficients, Laplace transforms, systems of differential equations. Applications include vibratory motion, satellite and rocket motion, pursuit problems, population models and chemical kinetics.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2000.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for both Applied Mathematics/Pure Mathematics 3260 and Engineering 3411.

3320

Abstract Algebra

is an introduction to groups and group homomorphisms including cyclic groups, cosets, Lagrange's theorem, normal subgroups and quotient groups, introduction to rings and ring homomorphisms including ideals, prime and maximal ideals, quotient rings, integral domains and fields.

Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 2320.

3330

Euclidean Geometry

is classical Euclidean geometry of the triangle and circle. The inversion transformation, including the theorem of Feuerbach. Elliptic and hyperbolic geometries.

Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 2320 or Mathematics 2051.

3340

Introductory Combinatorics

includes Topics such as distributions, the binomial and multinomial theorems, Stirling numbers, recurrence relations, generating functions and the inclusion-exclusion principle. Emphasis will be on applications.

Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 2320.

3370

Introductory Number Theory

is perfect numbers and primes, divisibility, Euclidean algorithm, greatest common divisors, primes and the unique factorization theorem, congruences, cryptography (secrecy systems), Euler-Fermat theorems, power residues, primitive roots, arithmetic functions, Diophantine equations, topics above in the setting of the Gaussian integers.

Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 2320.

3410

Mathematical Statistics I

is basic probability concepts, combinatorial analysis, conditional probability, independence, random variable, distribution function, mathematical expectation, Chebyshev's inequality, distribution of two random variables, binomial and related distributions, Poisson, gamma, normal, bivariate normal, t, and F distributions, transformations of variables including the moment-generating function approach.

One and a half hour tutorial period weekly.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2000.