Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Arts (2007/2008)
6.16 History
6.16.1 General Degree
  1. See the General Regulations for the B.A. Degree.

  2. Any one of History 1010-1015 or the sequence History 1100* and 1101* form the introductions to the theory and practice of history. Third and fourth-year students taking History courses as electives or to satisfy General Regulations for the B.A. Degree are encouraged to enrol in the department's second-year courses. Students cannot receive credit for more than two first-year courses.

  3. All students who Major in History will be assisted by a faculty advisor who will help them in planning their academic programs. It is essential that students register with the Department at an early stage of their studies.

  4. Major in History

    Students who undertake a Major in History must complete 36 credit hours in History, including:

    1. Three credit hours in a course beginning with the initial digit '1'. All first-year courses in History are research/writing courses.

    2. At least 12 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '2' including 3 credit hours in one of History 2200, 2210 or 2400.

    3. With the exception of History 3785, students should complete at least 9 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '2' before registering in a course with the initial digit '3'. Students should obtain advice on the appropriate courses from their faculty advisor.

    4. At least 9 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '3'. Students must complete History 3840 for which there is a prerequisite of 12 credit hours in History.

    5. Students should complete at least 3 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '3' before registering in a course with the initial digit '4'.

    6. At least 6 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '4'.

    7. Six additional credit hours in courses with an initial digit beyond '1'.

    8. The following courses may not be used to meet the requirements for a Major in History without the prior written approval of the Head: 4480, 4800, 4821, 4822, and 4999.

    9. No more than 15 transfer credit hours in History may be used to fulfil the requirements for a Major in History.

    10. Some fourth-year courses may require completion of courses in the same topic/subject area. Such prerequisites are at the discretion of the instructor.

  5. Minor in History

    Students who undertake a Minor in History must complete 24 credit hours in History, including:

    1. Three credit hours in a course beginning with the initial digit '1'. All first-year courses in History are research/writing courses.

    2. At least 9 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '2'.

    3. Students should complete at least 6 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '2' before registering in a course with the initial digit '3'.

    4. At least 6 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '3'.

    5. At least 3 credit hours in courses with the initial digit '4'.

    6. No more than 9 transfer credit hours in History may be used to fulfil the requirements for a Minor in History.

    7. Three additional credit hours in courses with an initial digit beyond "1'.

    8. Some fourth-year courses may require completion of courses in the same topic/subject area. Such prerequisites are at the discretion of the instructor.

  6. Specialization in Maritime History

    The Department of History offers a specialization in Maritime History. Recommended courses include History 2100**, History 2110, History 3680, History 3690, and 6 credit hours from History 4670-4690.

    * For descriptions of History 1100 and 1101, see the separate section under Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.

    ** Sir Wilfred Grenfell College only.

6.16.2 Honours Degree
  1. Students intending to take an Honours Degree with a Major in History must comply with the General Regulations for the Honours degree of Bachelor of Arts.

  2. For consideration as entrants during the Fall semester, students must make application by 30 June; for the Winter semester, by 1 November. Applications received after 30 June will be considered for the Winter semester; applications received after 1 November will be considered for the next Fall semester. Students intending to complete an Honours degree in History will be assisted by a faculty advisor who will help them in planning their academic programs. The academic programs for Honours students must be approved by the Head or delegate.

  3. Students are required to complete at least 60 credit hours in History, 45 chosen in accordance with the pattern set out in the Departmental General Degree Regulation No. 4 above. In addition, students must complete History 3840 (or the former 4801), 4800, 4821, 4822, and 4999. The minimum grades required are: (a) 70%, or an average of 75%, in the prescribed number of courses, and (b) 70% in History 4999.

  4. Students electing Joint Honours are required to complete at least 51 credit hours in History, 39 chosen in accordance with the pattern set out in the Departmental General Degree Regulation No. 4 above. In addition, students must complete History 3840 (or the former 4801), 4800, 4821, and 4822, with grades prescribed in Honours Degree Regulation No. 3. If the candidate chooses to do the Honours Essay (4999) in History, it must be passed with a grade of 70% or better.

  5. No more than 27 transfer credit hours may be included in the minimum 60 credit hours required for the Honours degree in History.

Note:

Normally, an Honours degree is required for those entering graduate studies. However, students taking a B.A. degree may enter graduate studies after completing History 3840 (or the former 4801), 4800, 4821, or equivalents.

6.16.3 Course List

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

1010

The North Atlantic in the Age of Expansion, 1492-1776

is a thematic examination of European imperial expansion into the North Atlantic and the Americas, starting with the discoveries of Columbus and concluding with American Independence. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1011

Europe and the Wider World, 1750-1914

is a thematic examination of the political, economic, social and cultural developments in Europe and the wider world from the French Revolution to World War I. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1012

The World in the Twentieth Century

will examine some of the major themes in world history since 1914. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1013

Issues in Canadian History

will examine the historical context for various contemporary problems being experienced by Canadians. This course qualifies as a research/ writing course.

1014

Issues in United States History

will examine several historical themes or problems in the history of the United States. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1015

Ideas and Society in the West

introduces students to early modern western history (1500 - 1800) through the study of original texts. It will combine lectures on the historical background to the texts, discussion of them and analysis of their meanings in assigned essays. This course qualifies as a research/ writing course.

1070

A History of Canada's Native Peoples

- inactive course.

2020

Introduction to Ancient History

(same as Classics 2025) is an introduction to the history of ancient city-states, kingdoms and empires, including economic, social, political and cultural developments.

2031

Ancient Asian History

- inactive course.

2035

History of Classical Greece

(same as Classics 2035) is a survey of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great, with special reference to the social and political institutions of the fifth century B.C.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for History/Classics 2035 and either of the former History/Classics 3910 or History/Classics 2030.

2040

History of Rome

(same as Classics 2040) is a survey of Roman history from the early monarchy to the reign of Constantine, with special reference to society and politics in the late Republic and early Empire.

Note:

Students may not receive credit for History/Classics 2040 and the former History/Classics 3920.

2110

North Atlantic History Since 1820

is a survey of the relations among the regions of the North Atlantic since 1820. Emphasis will be placed on social and economic history.

2130

Seafaring Places and Seafaring Peoples: An Introduction to Oceanic History 1650-1850

- inactive course.

2200

Canadian History to Confederation, 1867

is a survey of Canadian History to Confederation, 1867.

2210

Canada Since 1867

is a survey of Canadian history since Confederation.

2300

Introduction to Modern European History, 1500-1789

is an introduction to the main issues and problems in early modern European history with an emphasis on the political, social, economic and cultural developments from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century.

2310

Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1789-1914

is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe from 1789-1914.

2320

Medieval Europe to 1050

(same as Medieval Studies 2001) is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of the early Middle Ages.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 2320 and the former History 2030.

2330

Medieval Europe, 1050 to the Reformation

(same as Medieval Studies 2002) is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe in the high and late Middle Ages.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 2330 and the former History 2030.

2340

European Urban History

examines the development of urban networks and the growth of specific towns and cities in early modern and modern Europe. We will also study how these centres were perceived, and the roles of public spaces and public festivals. Much of this course is devoted to examining the conditions found in urban centres and the impact on local inhabitants. The course concludes with a study of nineteenth-century urban boosterism.

Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in history.

2350

Europe in the Twentieth Century

(same as European Studies 2000 and Political Science 2350) examines social, economic, and political changes from 1918 to the present including the collapse of monarchies, the emergence of mass politics, fascism and totalitarianism, World War II, postwar reconstruction and the welfare state, European integration, and Europe in the postwar economic and political order. The course will examine Britain, France, Germany, and Italy, and particularly the European Union. Special attention will be paid to the demise of class politics and the impact of postwar affluence.

2400

A History of Atlantic Canada since 1500

is a history of the peoples and provinces of Atlantic Canada from the time of first European contact with First Nations.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for History 2400 and the former History 3100.

2500

The Twentieth Century I

is a study of the world-wide impact of the main events and developments in the age of global interdependence.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 2500 and the former History 3700.

2510

The Twentieth Century II

is an historical analysis of the main issues in the contemporary world since 1945.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 2510 and the former History 3710.

2600

History of the United States of America to 1865

is a survey of the history of the United States of America from the origins of the independence movement to the Civil War.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for History 2600 and the former History 3230.

2610

History of the United States of America Since 1865

is a survey of the history of the United States of America since the Civil War.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for History 2610 and the former History 3240.

2665

Sickness and Health in Western Society

examines changing understandings of disease causation and how the human body functions, the evolution of formal medical education, and the rise of medical institutions. Examples of fine art, literature, and popular culture will be integrated into lectures and seminars to help provide a comprehensive overview of what it has been like to be ill and well over the last three millennia.

2700

Art History Survey I

(same as Visual Arts 2700) is the history of art from prehistoric times to the Renaissance.

2701

Art History Survey II

(same as Visual Arts 2701) is the history of art from the Renaissance to the twentieth century.

2760

An Introduction to Women’s Gendered History

provides an introduction to gender studies in history. This course examines women’s experience in the Western past with a view to complexities sometimes missed. It takes the gendering of history as a means to explore the significance of historical understanding in the ways in which we come to know the world.

3000

Medieval Books

(same as Medieval Studies 3000, English 3002, Religious Studies 3000) is an examination of the development and role of the manuscript book during the Middle Ages. Topics covered will include book production and dissemination; authors, scribes and audiences; and various kinds of books (e.g. glossed Bibles, anthologies, books of hours, etc.) and their uses.

Prerequisites: Medieval Studies 2000, 2001 or 2002 or permission of the instructor.

3005

West to East: Aspects of the German Intellectual Influence on Russia

(same as German 3005 and Russian 3005) examines the fluidity of ideas across geo-political borders, languages and cultures, by exploring how German intellectual discourse was received and reinterpreted by Russians in their literary, artistic and cultural dialogue. Ideas about the Romantic Hero become conflated with theories involving the Will, the Nietzschean Superman and the Proletarian Revolutionary, personified and embodied in what some scholars characterize as political/cultural Gods (Lenin, Stalin, Hitler).

3011-3019

Special Topics in Ancient and Medieval History

are specialized studies in Ancient and Medieval history. Topics to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 3803 and History 3016.

3020

Art, Architecture and Medieval Life

(same as Medieval Studies 3001, Archaeology 3589, Folklore 3001) is an examination of the development of medieval art and architecture and of the ways in which they mirror various aspects of life in the Middle Ages. This course will include a discussion of art and architecture in the countryside, in the town, in the castle, in the cathedral and in the cloister.

Note:

It is recommended, but not obligatory, that students should have successfully completed one of the following courses: Archaeology 2480, Folklore 1000 or 2000, History 2320/Medieval Studies 2001, History 2330/Medieval Studies 2002, Medieval Studies 2000.

3030

Environmental History

examines the history of human relationships to the natural environment. The focus of the course is the history of environmental changes caused by humans, the reciprocal influence of the natural environment on human cultures and societies. Case Studies will introduce patterns of ecological change associated with broad historical transformations such as colonialism, military conflict, the development of world economies, etc.

3050

History of Warfare to 1789

is a survey of major developments in the history of warfare from the earliest times to 1789 with particular emphasis on changes in the nature and conduct of warfare, the evolution of military thinking, the organization of military and naval forces, the impact of technological change, the emergence of professionalism and the relationship between societies and armed forces.

3060

History of Modern Warfare since 1789

is an examination of those major developments which have affected the nature and conduct of warfare in the period since 1789, with particular emphasis on the evolution of military thinking, the impact of technology on organization and planning, the role of air power, the civil-military relationship, professionalism in the armed forces, and the changing nature of warfare, the emergence of total war, global war, guerilla warfare, and limited warfare.

3110

History of Newfoundland to 1815

studies the growth of settlement and the manner in which a 'migratory' fishery carried on from England and Ireland changed into a 'sedentary' fishery carried on by residents of Newfoundland.

3120

Modern Newfoundland Since 1815

examines the establishment and development of political institutions, changes in economic structure and the growth of populations.

3130

History of French Canada Since 1791

is a discussion of political, social, economic, cultural and religious developments from the Canada Act to the present.

3140

Social History of the Canadian Worker to 1896

- inactive course.

3150

Social History of the Canadian Worker since 1896

- inactive course.

3200

Women and the Law in Newfoundland History

(same as Law and Society 3200) examines how legal reforms addressed or challenged the values of the community. Students will investigate the various ways in which Newfoundland women interacted with the law and on occasion found themselves before a magistrate.

3250

Migration History of North America

- inactive course.

3270

Christianity and the Roman Empire

(same as Classics 3270 and Religious Studies 3270) is a study of the relationship between Christianity and the Roman Empire from the first to the fourth century.

3330

France, 1750-1852

- inactive course.

3340

France Since 1852

- inactive course.

3350

Imperial Russia

- inactive course.

3360

Revolutionary and Soviet Russia

studies Russian history from the 1917 Revolutions to the emergence of the USSR as a superpower.

3370

German History I, to the Mid-Nineteenth Century

- inactive course.

3380

German History II, Since the Mid-Nineteenth Century

examines the history of German-speaking central Europe with special reference to the evolution of modern Germany since the mid-nineteenth century.

3440

History of the British Empire and Commonwealth since 1815

examines the transition from British Empire to Commonwealth of Nations.

3450

Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485-1714

examines the emergence of Britain under the Tudors and early Stuart monarchs.

3460

British History Since 1714

examines British history from the accession of the Hanoverians to the welfare state.

3480

History of Ireland, 1603 to the Great Famine

is a survey of Irish history from Hugh O'Neill's submission to the English in 1603 to the mid-nineteenth century disaster of the Great Famine.

3490

History of Ireland Since the Great Famine

is a survey of Irish history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 3490 and the former History 3470.

3515

Prehistory of Mesoamerica

- inactive course.

3520

The Early Ethnohistory of North America's Native Peoples

(same as Archaeology 3520) examines the North American native response to early European contact and initial settlement. Particular attention will be paid to cultural change resulting from the adoption of European goods, participation in the fur trade, the introduction of European disease, and the adaptation to a permanent European presence.

3525

The Later Ethnohistory of North America's Native Peoples

(same as Archaeology 3525) examines Indian and Inuit cultural history of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including the fur trade, resistance and accommodation to European expansion, the emergence of revitalization movements, demographic changes, and population shifts. Special emphasis will be placed on the ethnohistory of the native peoples of what is now Canada and northern United States.

3530

Historical Archaeology

(same as Archaeology 3582) will introduce students to historical archaeology, with special reference to the North Atlantic, 1000 to 1900 AD. The archaeology of specific historic sites, including Newfoundland sites, will be examined in order to raise theoretical issues and to give practical examples of methodology. Students will be introduced to the methodological challenges of palaeography, analysis of historic maps, survey, excavation and analysis of complex sites, underwater archaeology, documentary archaeology, material culture and subsistence studies, interpretation, conservation and cultural resource management. The course will consider theoretical approaches including historical anthropology, ethnohistory, world systems and consumer studies.

3535

Historical Anthropology

(same as Archaeology 3584) will explore selected issues in historical anthropology, with special reference to the Mediterranean and North Atlantic worlds. Students will read specific case studies in order to explore the theoretical issues raised by the attempt to understand historically-documented past cultures. In order to give practical examples of methodology classes will analyse primary source material. Students will be introduced to the textual analysis of myth and legal records, to the interpretation of images and to the analysis of patterns in material culture. The course will consider specific current interpretive issues, particularly the rise of individualism, the consumer revolution and the cultural construction of gender.

3540

History of China

- inactive course.

3545

History of Modern Japan

- inactive course.

3550

History of India

- inactive course.

3555

Methods and Materials in Historical Archaeology

(same as Archaeology 3555) is a combination lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint students with the analysis of artifacts and other evidence from historical archaeological sites. It is ordinarily intended to follow Archaeology 3480, Field and Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology.

3560

A History of Human Rights

- inactive course.

3570

The Modern Middle East

is an examination of the peoples and states of the Middle East and their interaction with each other and with the great powers since the mid-nineteenth century.

3580

South Africa Since 1815

- inactive course.

3585

Tropical Africa Since 1800

- inactive course.

3600

Industrial Revolutions of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

- inactive course.

3610

International Economic History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

- inactive course.

3620

Canadian Economic History to the End of the Nineteenth Century

- inactive course.

3630

Canadian Economic History in the Twentieth Century

- inactive course.

3650

Canadian Business History

- inactive course.

3660

The Scientific Revolution

- inactive course.

3665

History of Western Medicine

introduces students to the major topics and themes with which historians of medicine are currently engaged. These include the nature of doctor-patient relationships, perceptions of the body, professionalization, patterns of disease, and the development of European public health movements. The course traces the practice of medicine from ancient Greece to the present although the primary focus will be on the period from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century.

Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in history at the 2000 level or above.

3675

Navies and Societies Since 1650

is an examination of the rise of modern navies since 1650 that places navies and naval decisions within broader national and international political, economic and social contexts.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 3675 and the former History 3822.

3680

North Atlantic Seafaring to 1850

studies the maritime mercantile development of the countries on the Atlantic littoral, 1650-1850.

3690

North Atlantic Seafaring from 1850

- inactive course.

3700

Art History: The Italian Renaissance

- inactive course.

3701

Art History: The Renaissance Outside Italy

(same as Visual Arts 3701) examines the Renaissance outside Italy from the late fourteenth century and the international style through the sixteenth century.

3710-3729

Special Topics in British History

are available only as part of the Harlow Campus Semester.

3740-3750

Studies in Modern Social and Intellectual History

are selected studies in the history of modern ideas and society. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

3760

Women in Western Society and Culture I

- inactive course.

3770

Women in Western Society and Culture II

are selected themes in the history of women in the modern period with a focus on cultural attitudes toward women, demographic trends affecting women, the impact of changing economic roles, and the development of feminism.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 3770 and the former History 3761.

3780

Women in Medieval Europe, 500-1500

will look at medieval women in their social, political and religious contexts in order to understand women's lives in the past.

Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in History at the 2000 level or above.

Note:

Credit cannot be obtained for History 3780 and the former History 4006.

3785

The European Family: The Age of Faith to the Welfare State

focuses on the family in Europe from the middle ages to the early twentieth century. Topics examined will include: family structure, kinship, demography, sexuality, gender relations, child-rearing, attitudes towards the elderly and care of them, and the place of the family in the larger community.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: At least 3 credit hours in history at the 2nd-year level, or permission of the instructors.

3800-3830 (Excluding 3822)

Contemporary Problems in Historical Perspective

is an analysis of developments leading to a contemporary issue or problem selected each year or semester. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 3803 and History 3016.

3840

Historical Methods

is an introduction to the methods and practices of history in the modern era. This course is compulsory for Honours students and Majors, including those intending to apply for graduate studies.

Prerequisite: Twelve credit hours in History.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 3840 and the former History 4801.

3860

Vernacular Architecture

(same as Folklore 3860 and Archaeology 3860) is an historical survey of vernacular architectural forms in various regions of North America, with attention to Newfoundland materials. Issues discussed include the relationship of house form and culture, the concepts of antecedents, diffusion, innovation, and evolution of building forms and technologies, and the siting of buildings in the landscape. Dwelling houses, outbuildings, churches and industrial vernacular architecture will be included.

3870

An Introduction to the History of Western Architecture Since the Renaissance

introduces students to the history of architecture in the western world, beginning with the revival of classical forms in Renaissance Italy.

3999

Quantitative Approach in Historical Writing

- inactive course.

4000-4010

Special Topics in Ancient and Medieval History

are specialized studies in Ancient and Medieval history. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4100

History and Memory

(same as Folklore 4100) is a course which recognizes that memory is not one of the natural parts of ourselves, nor is remembering a way of connecting with a single reference point in a social reality outside ourselves. These things are socially determined. Starting here, this course is designed to have students reflect on what they know about the past and how they know about it. The class will examine how individual and social memory works, concentrating on particular historical contexts.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 4100 and the former History 4569.

4110-4130

Special Topics in North Atlantic History

are specialized studies in the history of the North Atlantic. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4210-4229 (Excluding 4214)

Special Topics in North American History

are specialized studies in the history of North America. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4230

Special Topics in Newfoundland History I

are specialized studies in the history of Newfoundland to the mid-nineteenth century.

4231

Special Topics in Newfoundland History II

are specialized studies in the history of Newfoundland since the mid-nineteenth century.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 4231 and Political Science 4731.

4232

Special Topics in Newfoundland History III

- inactive course.

4240-4260

Special Topics in Canadian History

are specialized studies in Canadian history. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4310-4330

Special Topics in European History

are specialized studies in the history of Europe. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4360-4380

Special Topics in European History

are available only as part of the Harlow Campus semester.

4410-4430

Historical Problems

are specialized studies in historical problems. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4480

Folklore and Oral History

(same as Folklore 4480) is a seminar course which deals with the uses of oral (and aural) sources, particularly those which have a traditional dimension, for the study of history. It will discuss the methods developed by Vansina, Dorson and others for evaluating the historical meaning of oral traditions in literate and non-literate cultures. The use of oral traditions in the study of traditional modes of life and work such as fishing and farming will be considered. The use of oral traditions in the study of social and political history will also be discussed.

4520-4529

Special Topics in Economic and Mercantile History

are specialized studies in Economic and Mercantile history. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4560-4570 (Excluding 4569)

Special Topics in Social and Intellectual History

are specialized studies in Social and Intellectual history. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4670-4690

Special Topics in Maritime History

are specialized studies in Maritime history. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4730

Art History: Modern Art I Precursors to Modernism

(same as Visual Arts 4730) is an examination of the cultural, social, and political forces which, from 1750 to 1850, were to have a major impact on modernity and later modern art.

Prerequisites: Six credit hours in art history or permission of the chair of the Visual Arts Program.

4731

Art History: Modern Art II Early Modernism

(same as Visual Arts 4731) is an examination of the various cultural and social forces between 1850 and 1914 which shaped the rise of the Modern movement.

Prerequisites: Six credit hours in art history or permission of the chair of the Visual Arts Program.

4800

Historiography

is an introduction to the major historians and historiographical traditions of the West. This course is for Honours students and other selected students, including those intending to apply for graduate studies.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Head of Department

4810

Documents Management

(same as Folklore 4810) is an introduction to the management of records and documents, both official and private.

4821

Reading Course

is a directed reading course for Honours and selected students including those intending to apply for graduate studies. Readings will be taken from a list of works by historians, or social theorists whose works are related to history.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Head of Department.

4822

Reading Course

is a directed reading course for Honours and selected students. The readings will be chosen in such a way as to supplement a student's knowledge of his/her area of specialization and, where appropriate, to prepare the student for the honours essay. If a student intends to complete History 4999, a proposal for the honours essay will be a requirement of the course.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Head of Department.

Note:

Credit may not be obtained for both History 4822 and the former History 4820.

4830-4850

Reading Courses

are directed reading courses for selected B.A. students. Students must receive approval of Department Head or delegate before registering for these courses.

4999

Honours Essay

Prerequisite: History 4822.