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Marcia Porter
Luke Redmond

Luke Redmond sees just about every experience as a great learning opportunity.

And like many of his fellow fourth-years in the bachelor of nursing (BN) program at Memorial's School of Nursing (SON), the friendly and outgoing Mr. Redmond is already working.

He's one of two SON students who've moved to picturesque Bonavista for employment at the local Bonavista Hospital.

"It's a busy little hospital," said Mr. Redmond, of the 15-bed facility. "We serve around 40 communities and we see everything, and people of all ages."

So what drew him to Bonavista, besides the appeal of full-time work and the great ocean view from the window of his new home?

"I went to Bonavista for my preceptor course last year and loved it," he said. "They have a strong, interdisciplinary team. They know each other and encourage each other, and give the kind of instructive feedback that is so helpful for learning."

Preceptorship is the name of a third-year clinical course in the BN program that pairs students with nurse preceptors, nurses employed on site who serve as mentors to nursing students.

These courses have a major impact on students, who often come away with a sense of the sort of nursing practice they'd like to pursue.

In Bonavista, Mr. Redmond will work between acute and emergency departments. It's a temporary, full-year position that he thinks will help open doors and new opportunities.

"It's really important to take advantage of every opportunity that comes along."

What has Mr. Redmond learned about the kind of nursing he might like to pursue?

"I will always love frontline, bedside nursing," he said. "You learn that even the little things make a difference. I've always been someone who has really enjoyed helping people. That's why I came into nursing."

He's also really interested in policies, decision-making and leadership.

And from almost his first day in nursing school, Mr. Redmond was interested in being at the forefront of student life. He sought to balance the academic with his many volunteer roles.

He served as class representative on Nursing Society, nursing representative on the Memorial University Students Union (MUNSU), and on the executive of the 30,000 member Canadian Nursing Students' Association, (CNSA).

"We've worked to implement many new things, and we've built a strong relationship with faculty and staff," he said.

"What I have learned is that it's amazing to see what happens when we all come together."

Jun 11th, 2014

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