Welcome

Archaeologists and bioarchaeologists study past human cultures and behaviour through the material left behind: artifacts and features, plant and animal remains, human remains, sediments, sites, and their associated landscapes.

In the Department of Archaeology, our students engage in practical training and experiential learning in classroom, laboratory and field work settings that provide a comprehensive education and transferable skills. State-of-the-art laboratories specializing in applied archaeological sciences, archaeobotany, archaeological conservation, and prehistoric, historical and aboriginal archaeology integrate undergraduates into community-university research initiatives from Northern Labrador to French Guiana and from British Columbia to Northwest Europe.

As one of the largest Archaeology departments in the country, we train our students to become effective researchers, critical thinkers, and active stewards for our shared archaeological heritage.

News

Tors Cove - Summer Field School 2016

Supervised by Dr. Catherine Losier, the Archaeology Department's field school is currently underway at Tors Cove on the Southern Shore of the Avalon Peninsula.

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Archaeological Field School Orientation at MUN Botanical Garden

Students participating in the Archaeological Field School Orientation had a unique experiential learning opportunity at MUN Botanical Garden during the Spring intercession.

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Alicia Morry receives Killam Fellowship

Archaeology undergraduate Alicia Morry is one of just two Memorial students to receive the Killam Fellowship in 2016. The award provides exceptional undergraduate students from Canadian universities with the opportunity to study at institutions in the United States.

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Dr. Lisa Rankin honoured for graduate student mentoring

Dr. Lisa Rankin, associate professor in the Department of Archaeology, has won the Geoffrey Marshall Mentoring Award from the Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools.

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Features

Course Offering - Fall 2016

ARCH 1005: Critical Reading and Writing in Aboriginal and Indigenous Studies.

This course features the analysis of scholarly literature, media, and others sources of knowledge related to Aboriginal and Indigenous studies. This is the Introductory course for the new Certificate in Aboriginal and Indigenous Studies.

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Course Offering - Fall 2016

ARCH 6685: When Worlds Meet: Nature/Culture and Ontological Conflicts.

This graduate course explores the theoretical developments that are putting into question the modern ontological divide between nature and culture. Students will investigate the implications that these developments have for scientific and political practices, and will examine the emerging attempts at understanding ontological multiplicity and conflicts which challenge the most basic assumptions about the ultimate consititution of reality.

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'Contact in the 16th Century: Networks among Fishers, Foragers and Farmers'

A new book, Contact in the 16th Century: Networks among Fishers, Foragers and Farmers, presents new research on the archaeology and history of early contacts between Europeans and First Nations peoples throughout Eastern and Atlantic Canada.

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'Etudes Inuit Studies: The Inuit in southern Labrador'

The latest volume of  Études Inuit Studies presents research that examines the Inuit occupation of southern Labrador. With a particular focus on Inuit-European contact and relations the volume features articles by Peter Pope, Lisa Rankin, Amanda Crompton and Amelia Fay.

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