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Jean-Luc Pilote

Room Number:  ER5024

Phone:  902-698-0702

Email:  jpilote @ mun.ca

Thesis Title:

Volcanic, structural, and hydrothermal reconstruction of the Ming volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, Baie Verte, Newfoundland

Supervisor:  Dr. Stephen Piercey

Research Interests:

I have broad and diverse interest in the evolution of the Appalachian mountain belt. In an overly simplified way, the Appalachians are characterised by the amalgamation of microcontinents on the building margin of Laurentia during the Paleozoic. Each tectonostratigraphic zone and subzone presents differences in lithologies, thermal and structural evolution, and styles of mineralization, including important volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits/districts (e.g. Bathurst Camp, Buchans, Rambler and Ming mines).

Most of my research up to this point in my geological career has been focused on post-collisional, slab break-off related, bimodal intrusions and related volcanic rocks in northern New Brunswick, with the application of field observations combined with petrological, geochemical, and geochronological analyses. However, my experience working on projects not directly related to my thesis project during and following my MSc work has given me the opportunity to refine my interests in geology. For example, I have developed a particular interest in structures at micro- and macro-scale in metamorphic rocks and the processes responsible for their origin. I am also interested in the magmatic and hydrothermal processes involved in the genesis of mineral deposits, especially in VMS and porphyry-type deposits. I believe that field relationships are a core requirement for understanding the geological framework of any mineral deposit through combined application of stratigraphy, lithogeochemistry, and geochronology along with the analysis of the relationships between the host rocks and the deposit. Furthermore, as a result of my relatively limited experience in working on orogen-scale projects, I have become interested in tectonic modeling and the relationships of widely distributed metallogenic deposits within tectonostratigraphic belts. Currently in my first year of a PhD program, my current project involves elements enumerated above with the addition of reconstructing the volcanic architecture hosting a VMS deposit (Ming Mine, Baie Verte, NL) in a 3D model and its associated intrinsic characteristics

 

Research Interests:

I have broad and diverse interest in the evolution of the Appalachian mountain belt. In an overly simplified way, the Appalachians are characterised by the amalgamation of microcontinents on the building margin of Laurentia during the Paleozoic. Each tectonostratigraphic zone and subzone presents differences in lithologies, thermal and structural evolution, and styles of mineralization, including important volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits/districts (e.g. Bathurst Camp, Buchans, Rambler and Ming mines).

Most of my research up to this point in my geological career has been focused on post-collisional, slab break-off related, bimodal intrusions and related volcanic rocks in northern New Brunswick, with the application of field observations combined with petrological, geochemical, and geochronological analyses. However, my experience working on projects not directly related to my thesis project during and following my MSc work has given me the opportunity to refine my interests in geology. For example, I have developed a particular interest in structures at micro- and macro-scale in metamorphic rocks and the processes responsible for their origin. I am also interested in the magmatic and hydrothermal processes involved in the genesis of mineral deposits, especially in VMS and porphyry-type deposits. I believe that field relationships are a core requirement for understanding the geological framework of any mineral deposit through combined application of stratigraphy, lithogeochemistry, and geochronology along with the analysis of the relationships between the host rocks and the deposit. Furthermore, as a result of my relatively limited experience in working on orogen-scale projects, I have become interested in tectonic modeling and the relationships of widely distributed metallogenic deposits within tectonostratigraphic belts. Currently in my first year of a PhD program, my current project involves elements enumerated above with the addition of reconstructing the volcanic architecture hosting a VMS deposit (Ming Mine, Baie Verte, NL) in a 3D model and its associated intrinsic characteristics.

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