President's Report 2006 | Honour Roll

Professor Emeritus, Spring 2006 Convocation

The following Memorial professor was honoured with the distinction professor emeritus during spring 2005 convocation. The category of professor emeritus is open only to retired members of the faculty. To be eligible, a person must have served at least 10 years as a regular full-time faculty member at Memorial and must have held the rank of professor upon retirement. The prime criterion for nomination is sustained, outstanding scholarly work and/or service to the university.

Dr. Neil V. Rosenberg

Born in Seattle, Washington, Dr. Neil Rosenberg received his first musical training in classical violin at age seven. He later studied at Oberlin College in Ohio where he learned bluegrass music, teaching himself how to play the five-string banjo and the mandolin. He went on to study at Indiana University where he received his MA and PhD. He moved to Newfoundland to teach with Memorial's Department of Folklore in 1968. Highlights of his academic career include the authoring of four major books: Transforming Tradition: Folk Music Revivals Examined (1993); Bluegrass: A History (1985); Folklore and Oral History (1978); and Bill Monroe and His Blue Grass Boys: An Illustrated Discography (1974). He has also published more than 65 articles in books and journals, and has edited and annotated some 35 recordings. He has also performed with numerous musical groups, and taken part in many broadcasts and concerts as a soloist and accompanist. Dr. Rosenberg is a Fellow of the American Folklore Society. In 1998 he won a Grammy award for his contribution to the album notes of Smithsonian/ Folkways' Anthology of American Folk Music. He retired from Memorial in 2004.

Professores emeriti, fall 2005 convocation

The following Memorial professors were honoured with the distinction professor during the fall 2005 convocation. The category of professor emeritus is open only to retired members of the faculty. To be eligible, a person must have served at least 10 years as a regular full-time faculty member at Memorial and must have held the rank of professor upon retirement. The prime criterion for nomination is sustained, outstanding scholarly work and/or service to the university.

Derek Burton

Dr. Derek Burton received a B.Sc. (Hons) in zoology from the University of Wales and a PhD in zoology from the University of London. He came to Memorial in 1971 where he placed equal emphasis on both biological teaching and research. Dr. Burton's research on the vertebrate autonomic nervous system has used the complex chromatotropic system in fish as a model. His work has been recognized both nationally and internationally. Dr. Burton was elected to the National Council of the Canadian Society of Zoologists for two consecutive periods of three years.

Joseph Paul Hodych

Dr. Joseph Paul Hodych received his MA and PhD at the University of Toronto. Since he joined Memorial University in 1970, his major research interests have concentrated on understanding how rocks magnetize and improving our ability to read the rock magnetic record of continental drift. Dr. Hodych used this rock magnetic record to help determine how continents collided and drifted apart over the past billion years to form Newfoundland and its natural resources. Students will remember his spirited teaching.

Philip George Gardner

Dr. Philip Gardner received his MA from Cambridge and his PhD from the University of Liverpool. At Memorial, his primary field of interest was twentieth century British and American literature. Dr. Gardner is an accomplished author with a particular interest in the acclaimed English writer E.M. Forster. In 1988 Memorial University named him named University Research Professor, the institution's top research award, and upon his retirement in 2001 accorded him the title of Honorary Research Professor.

Richard Haedrich

Dr. Richard Haedrich obtained his PhD from Harvard University in 1966 and then spent a year in Denmark as a Fulbright Fellow doing further fish research, following which he returned to a position as a research scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. He came to Memorial in 1979 to work in the Department of Biology. He has been the director of the Newfoundland Institute of Cold Ocean Science and of the Ocean Sciences Centre. In 1999, Dr. Haedrich was named University Research Professor, the top honour accorded to a researcher at Memorial University.