President's Report 2006 | Alumni

Books by Alumni

THE RULE OF THE ADMIRALS, by Jerry Bannister

B.A. '90, B.A.(Hons.) '91, 384 pp, history, cloth and paper, $35.95, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, ON: The author examines governance in Newfoundland from the rule of the fishing admirals in 1699 to the establishment of representative government in 1832. It offers the first indepth account and shatters a few myths with regard to the rise and fall of naval government that dominated Newfoundland for more than a century.




REELS, ROCK AND ROSARIES, by Marjorie Doyle

M.A.'87, 224 pp, autobiography, paper, $19.95, Pottersfield Press, Lawrencetown, NS 2005: The story of one Newfoundland woman's life in music told with wit, charm, candour and insight. It is a memoir threaded with tunes weighted with memory ' the blues riff, the snatch of an adagio, the pop song heard in a cab and the powerful emotional punch of the island's traditional music.




FROM THE VOICES OF NURSES, by Marilyn Beaton

B.Sc.'67, M.B.A.'97, and Jeanette Walsh, 161 pp, history, paper, $14.95, Jesperson Publishing, St. John's, NL 2005: A vivid presentation of the oral history of health care in Newfoundland and Labrador as recounted to the authors by 33 Newfoundland nurses who graduated prior to 1950. The only documented history of nursing in Newfoundland and Labrador for the 60 years prior to Confederation ' as told by the women who were there on the front lines.



FUTURE: TENSE: THE COMING WORLD ORDER' by Gwynne Dyer

B.A.'63, D.Litt.'01, 264 pp, current affairs, paper, $19.99, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, ON 2004: Gwynne Dyer's follow-up to last year's best-selling Ignorant Armies, presents a polemical and provocative vision of a new world order 10 years from now: an American-led alliance that includes India and occupies much of the Middle East could be facing a European alliance led by France, Germany and Russia and a hostile, heavily armed China.




A COLD-BLOODED SCOUNDREL, by J.S. Cook

B.A.(Hons.)'98, M.A.'03, 236 pp, mystery, paper, $16.95, Brazen Books, St. John's, NL 2005: In a London haunted by Jack the Ripper's crimes, a male prostitute is brutally murdered. In the course of investigation, Detective Inspector Phillip Devlin becomes snared in intrigue and murder. In his struggle to end the violence, the inspector must face not only a ruthless killer but also his own inner demons.





MENDING BROKEN RELATIONSHIPS: FAITH-BASED COUNSELING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY, co-authored and edited by Neil Earle,

B.A.(Ed.)'66, B.A.'67, 204 pp, religion, paper, $18.00 (US), Connecting & Boding, 2004:The book is based on a manuscript by Dr. John Paul Eddy, professor emeritus of counselling at the University of North Texas. Earle contributed chapter seven on support groups, based on experiences he had while working in Toronto from 1987 to 1991.






THE ROSSITER FILE, by Thomas Rendell Curran

Pre-Med.Dip.60, B.Sc.(Hons.)'61, 341 pp, mystery, paper, $19.95, Breakwater Books, St. John's, NL 2005: On a summer night in 1947 the battered corpse of an impoverished old man is discovered in a laneway ' the result of an unfortunate accident' Unconvinced, Inspector Eric Stride of the Newfoundland Constabulary uncovers a trail of evidence that goes back 30 years and ends in a story of privilege and tragedy.





IN SEARCH OF GOD: GOD AND RELIGIOUS SCRIPTURES; SEEKING PROOF OF DIVINE REVELATION, by Dr. Mohammad Gad

MD'87, 138 pp, religion, paper, $13.95, self-published through iUniverse, 2004: Dr. Gad writes that he started the book "during my years in Newfoundland when I took a year off medical school in 1983 to do my own personal God searching.' In this work the author "attempts to search for God' by compiling different concepts gleaned from multiple sources over 20 years of research.






HOW STRONG THE ROOTS, by Clarence Dewling

B.A.(Ed.)'72, B.A.'75, 128 pp, poetry, paper, $14.95, Browns' Cove Production, NL 2005: This exploration of the strength of family and tradition is based on Dewling's experiences living on the northeast coast of Newfoundland. To order write: Site 3, Box 29, Trinity, A0C 2S0 or email








JACKYTAR, by Douglas Gosse

B.Ed.'91, M.Ed.'97, 283 pp, fiction, paper, $19.95, Jesperson Publishing, St. John's, NL 2005: Based on award-winning research conducted by Douglas Gosse, the novel of self-development and social critique is told through the eyes of Alexandre Murphy. She delves into twisting family secrets, the nature of language and identity, the influence of heritage, over four generations.






ROGUES AND HEROES, by Dr. Maura Hanrahan

B.A.'84 and Paul Butler, 167 pp, nonfiction, paper, $14.95, Flanker Press, St. John's, NL 2005: The authors recount the stories of fascinating Newfoundlanders, with an emphasis on the pre-1949 era. Some, such as opera star Georgina Stirling, were adored; others, like Peter Easton, reviled; still more inhabited that misty landscape that makes them rogues to some and heroes to others.





FISH INTO WINE: THE NEWFOUNDLAND PLANTATION IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, by Peter E. Pope

M.A.'86, PhD'92, 496 pp, history, paper, $24.95, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC 2004: In this highly praised work, which combines innovative archaeological analysis with historical research, Peter Pope examines the way of life that developed in 17th century Newfoundland, where settlement was sustained by seasonal migration to prosecute what was then a thriving cod fishery.





WONDERFUL STRANGE, by Dale Jarvis

M.A.'01, 205 pp, folklore, paper, $14.95, Flanker Press, St. John's, NL 2005: From Signal Hill's headless ghost to the Northern Peninsula's Isle of Demons to the fairy paths of the Southern Shore, Newfoundland and has more tales of fabulous and frightening creatures than any spot in Canada. Dale Jarvis's Wonderful Strange is your guide to close encounters with the unexplained.






NO MAN'S LAND: A PLAY, by Kevin Major

B.Sc.'73, 117 pp, drama, paper, $14.95, Pennywell Books, St. John's, NL 2005: This is the stage adaptation of Kevin Major's classic war novel, with its equally effective portrayal of the camaraderie and unnatural quiet before the storm, and its graphic account of the fight to survive the barbed wire and bullets in no man's land.



A PAINTER'S POEMS, by Christopher Pratt

Pratt, HN'72, 63 pp, poetry, paper, $16.95, Breakwater Books, St. John's, NL 2005: This handsome little book features poetry that Pratt has written over the past 50 years, and in some ways they parallel his development as a painter. They are autobiographical ' "pages from a diary.' They respond to encounters with people, places, and events that have particular significance and impact on his working life. Several illustrations by the author are also included.







BIOSYNTHESIS IN INSECTS, by David Morgan

MUC'48, biology, paper, $89.95 The Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, England 2004: In the first text book to be written on this subject, the author describes how insects make hormones, pheromones, defensive and offensive secretions and how they store and alter toxic compounds they obtain from plants. Intended for final year undergraduates and beginning research students in chemical ecology, pest control, agriculture, and entomology.

THERE, THERE, by Patrick Warner

B.A.'85, 64 pp, poetry, paper, $16.00, Vš§icule Press, Montr'l, QC 2005: The pithy and pensive poems in Patrick Warner's highly entertaining second collection, There, There, strike at subjects such as exile, snow, pigs, mud trout, Mormons, and marriage to explore the often poignant struggle between what we say and what we mean. Sometimes surreal, always surprising, these poems take the reader to a strange yet vividly imagined world.





HISTORY OF HEALTH CARE IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR, by Stephen Nolan,

B.A.'93, B.Ed.'05, 235 pp, nonfiction, paper, companion book,125 pp, $24.95 set, Cuff Publishing, St. John's, NL 2005: This book covers the evolution of health care to present day. With a forward by Memorial's first dean of Medicine, Dr. Ian Rusted, the book covers a broad swath of subjects that impacted health such as religion, Dr. Grenfell, the white plague and the Newfoundland Rangers and Confederation. Order copies through HCS archive and museum: Call 709-757-3296.



SLEEPER, by Nick Wilkshire,

B.A.'90, 320 pp, fiction, paper, $19.95, Jesperson Publishing, St. John's, NL 2005: When a prominent Toronto lawyer is murdered in Bannerman Park, the RNC pin the crime on Tom Fitzgerald, a drunk with a troubled past. David Hall, a junior at McGrath & Co., becomes the unlikely lead counsel on the most important criminal trial of the year. The resentment of colleagues is the least of David's worries when he discovers his own life is endangered by his ruthless pursuit of the truth.



LOST COUNTRY, by Patrick O'Flaherty

B.A.(Hons.)'59, M.A.'61, 516 pp, history, paper, $34.95, Long Beach Press, St. John's, NL 2005: Lost Country continues the narrative history the author began in his award-winning 1999 volume, Old Newfoundland: A History to 1843. Here he follows the story over the 90 years as Newfoundland advanced along a thorny path to Dominion status within the British Commonwealth and towards nationhood, a path it lost in the gloomy 1930s when it relinquished self-government in favour of direct rule from London.