Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Science (2012/2013)
8.10 Psychology

Psychology courses are designated by PSYC.

8.10.1 Non-Restricted Courses

These courses are open to all students who have the appropriate prerequisites Students who intend to major in Psychology should note the credit restrictions for PSYC 2010, 2100, 2440, 2610, 2810, 2920, and 3640 as taking any of these courses will reduce options in the Majors program

1000

Introduction to Psychology

is the first half of a two-semester introduction to Psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include history, research methodology, behavioural neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, and memory.

1001

Introduction to Psychology

is the second half of a two-semester introduction to Psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include emotion, motivation, stress and health, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment, and social psychology.

PR: PSYC 1000

2010

The Psychology of Human Development I

is a survey of principles underlying human development from the prenatal stage to adolescence. Topics covered will include sensorimotor, linguistic, perceptual, cognitive and motivational changes.

CR: PSYC 2025, PSYC 3050

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2011

The Psychology of Human Development II

is an examination of relevant research on socialization and personality development with special emphasis on attachment, imitation, sex role and moral development in childhood and adolescence.

CR: PSYC 2025

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2012

Adult Development from Young Adulthood to Old Age

examines physical and psychological changes from early adulthood until the end of the lifespan. Topics include career choices, love partnerships, parenting and grandparenting, cognitive changes, interpersonal changes, and healthy aging.

CR: the former PSYC 3052

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2100

Attitudes and Social Cognition

- inactive course.

2120

Interpersonal and Group Processes

- inactive course.

2150

Introduction to Forensic Psychology

will provide an in-depth overview of the relationship between psychology and the law. A variety of topics will be discussed and critically evaluated, including the use and misuse of psychology-based investigative methods such as offender and geographic profiling, detection of deception, investigative interviewing, eyewitness testimony, jury decision-making, corrections and treatment, risk assessment, and criminal responsibility.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2151

Health Psychology

will explore the history, aims and future of health psychology. Topics covered will consider the contributions of a wide range of psychological theory within the context of psychosocial risk factors for illness, illness prevention, health promotion, and the health care system itself. These theories extend from rather individualistic notions of health and wellness (e.g., personality, attitudes, and behaviour) to concepts associated with characteristics of the broader social environment (e.g., social support, economic challenges, and organizational factors). An overall bio-psycho-social approach to health and wellness is explored.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2240

Survey of Learning

is a survey of learning phenomena and learning theories. Topics to be studied will include a selection of the following: the evolutionary context of learning, habituation and sensitization, Pavlovian conditioning, instrumental learning, and generalization and discrimination in learning. Applications of learning principles to topics such as child rearing, education, drug use and rehabilitation, as well as to other topics of contemporary interest, will also be discussed.

CR: PSYC 3250, the former PSYC 2225, the former PSYC 2250

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2440

Human Memory and Cognition

is an introduction to the basic principles of human memory and information processing. Topics covered will include the organization, representation and retrieval of information in memory, attention, pattern recognition, language processing, mental imagery, reasoning, problem solving, and decision making. There will be an emphasis on the application of basic principles to real life situations.

CR: PSYC 3450, PSYC 2425

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2540

Psychology of Gender

is an examination of the influence of gender on development and socialization, attitude formation, cognition, personality and mental health.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2560

Intelligence

- inactive course.

2610

Personality

is a review of the research and theory pertaining to a psychological understanding of human personality.

CR: the former PSYC 2620, PSYC 2625, PSYC 3620

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2800

Drugs and Behaviour

is an examination of the neurophysiology of drug action, the measurable effect of drugs on experimentally controlled behaviour, and a survey of information available on common self-administered drugs and their immediate and long-term effects.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2810

Brain and Behaviour

is a broad survey of physiological psychology at an elementary level. Topics will include the following: structure of the nervous system, nerve conduction, sensory and motor systems, behavioural biology of reproduction, aggression, feeding and drinking, sleep and arousal, pleasure and pain, learning and memory.

CR: PSYC 2825, the former PSYC 2850, PSYC 3801

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2920

Research Methods in Psychology for Non-Majors

provides an introduction to the design, understanding, and application of psychological research. Topics covered include understanding and applying scientific method, creating and testing hypotheses, constructing reliable and valid experiments, and the proper use of controls. An emphasis will be placed on thinking critically about psychology and common errors of judgment.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major or any Psychology honours or joint honours programs

3430

The Psychology of Thinking

will present theories and experimental studies of problem solving, creativity and decision making. Topics covered will include the difficulties encountered in problem solving and solutions such as strategies for organizing and representing information, the production of ideas, transfer and discovery learning.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

3501

Industrial Psychology

- inactive course.

3533

Sexual Behaviour

covers the most important aspects of human sexuality with a psychology theory and research framework. The course will examine the biological, behavioural and socio-cultural bases of the human sexual response. Topics include sexual interaction and communication, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, reproduction, sexual orientation, transgender and intersex, variations in sexual behaviour, sex and gender, sexual dysfunction and therapy, and sexual coercion.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

3577

Program Evaluation

- inactive course.

3640

The Psychology of Abnormal Behaviour

covers problems of definition, the history of beliefs about abnormal behaviour and the implication of a behavioural model for the understanding and control of behaviour problems.

CR: PSYC 3650, PSYC 3626

PR: any 2000 level course in Psychology

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

4810

Human Neuropsychology

- inactive course.

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).
8.10.2 Majors Courses

These courses are restricted to Majors in Psychology and Behavioural Neuroscience.

2520

Mind and Brain

is based on the idea that psychological and neuroscience research efforts are synergistic. Neuroscience research can reveal mechanisms that help explain the mind and behavior, while concepts developed by psychological research often define the topics that neuroscience investigates. Topics such as memory, emotion, mental illness, and sleep will illustrate the utility of multiple research perspectives for developing a more complete understanding of psychological issues.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience; minors may be permitted to take this course if space permits

2570

Understanding Individual Differences

uses current conceptualizations of personality and ability as a focus. The course will review issues related to the measurement of individual differences, including test characteristics and ethics. Research from a variety of perspectives will be used to illustrate the contributions of different areas of psychology to our understanding of individual differences.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience; minors may be permitted to take this course if space permits

2910

Research Methods in Psychology I

is an introduction to the design and application of psychological research with particular concentration on understanding and applying scientific method, creating and testing hypotheses, constructing reliable and valid experiments, managing and analysing data sets, using statistical software, and scientific writing. Specific topics include descriptive statistics including measures of central tendency, variability and relative standing, inferential statistics such as t tests for one and two sample designs, correlation and regression, and non-parametric statistics.

CR: Statistics 2500, 2510, 2550, the former PSYC 2900, 2925

LH: one laboratory period weekly

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001; Mathematics 1000 or two of 1090, 1050 and 1051 (or equivalent) and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

2911

Research Methods in Psychology II

covers research methods in psychology with a focus on more complex research designs and statistical approaches, within the realm of experimentation and beyond the laboratory. Specific topics include controlling participant variables, using between and repeated measures designs within the context of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Particular ANOVA approaches include one-way and factorial designs, within subject design, and two-way mixed designs.

CR: Statistics 2501, 2560, the former PSYC 2901, 2950

LH: one laboratory period weekly

PR: PSYC 2910 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3050

Developmental Psychology

is an examination of the methods of study and an evaluation of current findings and theoretical issues of importance to an understanding of development. Topics will be drawn from perception, learning, cognition, social learning, memory and language development.

CR: PSYC 2010, PSYC 2025

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3100

Social Psychology

is an examination of the concepts and principles involved in social behaviour. Topics covered will include attitudes, social cognition, interpersonal relations, and group processes.

CR: PSYC 2100, PSYC 2125

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3250

Learning

(formerly PSYC 2250) examines how organisms adjust their behaviour to regularities in the environment as a result of experience.

CR: PSYC 2240, the former PSYC 2225, the former PSYC 2250

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, and 2911, and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3350

Perception

(formerly PSYC 2360) is a broad survey of theory and research in sensation and perception.

CR: the former PSYC 2360

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3450

Human Cognition

is an introduction to the experimental study of the mental representations and processes involved in human cognition. Topics such as attention, perception and pattern recognition, concepts and the organization of knowledge, language processes, mental imagery, reasoning, problem solving, decision making and skilled performance will be covered with an emphasis on experimental analysis and techniques.

CR: PSYC 2440, PSYC 2425

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3620

Personality Theory and Research

is a survey of personality theory and research.

CR: PSYC 2610, PSYC 2625, and the former PSYC 2620

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3650

Abnormal Psychology

is an examination of the nature, explanation and treatment of psychological disorders with an emphasis on research methods and current findings.

CR: PSYC 3640, PSYC 3626

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3750

Animal Behaviour I

is an introduction to the mechanisms, development, function and evolution of behaviour in animals. Topics include the history of ethology and comparative psychology, and behavioural ecology; methods of animal behaviour study, behaviour of animals in relation to physiology, learning, communication, mating systems, and other areas in Biology and Psychology.

CR: Biology 3750

PR: Biology 1001, 1002 and PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3800

Neuroscience

addresses the structure and function of neurons and neural circuits and examines principles of electrochemical neural communication at the macroscopic, microscopic and molecular level. The relevance of this knowledge to understanding brain mechanisms of normal and diseased brain functions will be touched upon. The molecular basis of the formation of some types of memories will be explored.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3801

Behavioural Neuroscience

is a survey of knowledge about brain mechanisms of behaviour. Topics will include the following: basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, somatosensory systems and pain, reward, mental illness, sleep and arousal, developmental neurobiology, sexual development and behaviour, regulation of eating and body weight, learning and memory, and cortical function, including cortical mediation of language.

CR: PSYC 2810, PSYC 2825, the former PSYC 2850

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570 and 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

3900

Design and Analysis III

is a course on complex and specialized research design in Psychology. Multifactor research designs that employ both between- and within-subjects independent variables. Advantages and disadvantages of using multifactor research designs to test psychological hypotheses. Hierarchical designs and incomplete factorials. The use of covariates and blocking to increase experimental precision. Problems created by missing data. Single subject designs. How to answer specific psychological questions in the context of complex designs. The design and analysis of non-experimental psychological research. Applications of such techniques as the analysis of variance and multiple linear regression to the data obtained with these research designs, with special attention to problems inherent in psychological research.

CR: PSYC 3950, Statistics 3520

LH: one laboratory period weekly

PR: PSYC 2911 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4050

Selected Topics in Developmental Psychology I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in developmental psychology.

PR: PSYC 3050 or the former 3051and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4051

Selected Topics in Developmental Psychology II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in developmental psychology.

PR: PSYC 3050 or the former 3051 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4070

Research Experience in Development Psychology

allows students to gain research experience in selected areas of developmental psychology.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911, and 3050 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4150

Selected Topics in Social Psychology I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in social psychology.

PR: PSYC 3100 or the former PSYC 3160 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4151

Selected Topics in Social Psychology II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in social psychology.

PR: PSYC 3100 or the former PSYC 3160 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4152

Selected Topics in Applied Social Psychology

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in applied social psychology.

PR: PSYC 3100 or the former PSYC 3160 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4160

Psychology and the Law

- inactive course.

4170

Research Experience in Social Psychology

will provide research experience in a selection of areas typically studied by social psychologists such as attitudes, prejudice, groups and social cognition. Students will acquire experience with research methods that are used to advance the body of knowledge in social psychology.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911, and 3100 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4250

Selected Topics in Learning and Motivation I

an intensive examination of a specific topic in learning and motivation.

PR: PSYC 3250 or the former PSYC 2250 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4251

Selected Topics in Learning and Motivation II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in learning and motivation.

PR: PSYC 3250 or the former PSYC 2250 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4260

Learning Processes and Drug Effects

- inactive course.

4270

Research Experience in Learning

allows students to gain research experience in selected areas of learning.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911, and 3250 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4350

Selected Topics in Perception I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in perception.

PR: PSYC 3350 or the former PSYC 2360 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4351

Selected Topics in Perception II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in perception.

PR: PSYC 3350 or the former PSYC 2360 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4370

Research Experience in Perception

allows students to gain research experience in selected areas of perception.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911 and 3350 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4450

Selected Topics in Cognition I

(same as the former PSYC 4400) is an intensive examination of a specific topic in cognition.

CR: the former PSYC 4400

PR: PSYC 3450 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4451

Selected Topics in Cognition II

(same as the former PSYC 4401) is an intensive examination of a specific topic in cognition.

CR: the former PSYC 4401

PR: PSYC 3450 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4452

Selected Topics in Cognition: Reading

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in reading and dyslexia.

PR: PSYC 3450 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4453

Selected Topics in Cognitive Science

(same as the former PSYC 4402) is an intensive examination of a specific topic in cognitive science from a psychological perspective.

CR: the former PSYC 4402

PR: two courses chosen from PSYC 3050, 3250, 3350, 3450, 3801 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4461

Psycholinguistics

- inactive course.

4462

Human Memory

surveys theories and research about how humans remember information and why they forget. Topics include research on sensory memory, short-term working memory, amnesia, forgetting, memory development, and semantic memory as well as practical issues such as how to improve memory.

PR: PSYC 3450 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4470

Research Experience in Cognition

allows students to gain research experience in selected areas of cognition.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911, and 3450 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4500

Selected Topics in Psychology I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in psychology that crosses traditional subdisciplines.

PR: two 3000-level majors courses (other than 3900) and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4501

Selected Topics in Psychology II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in psychology that crosses traditional subdisciplines.

PR: two 3000-level majors courses (other than 3900) and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4610

Selected Topics in Personality I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in personality.

PR: PSYC 3620 or the former PSYC 2620 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4620

Selected Topics in Personality II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in personality.

PR: PSYC 3620 or the former PSYC 2620 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4650

Selected Topics in Abnormal Behaviour I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in abnormal behaviour.

PR: PSYC 3650 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4651

Selected Topics in Abnormal Behaviour II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in abnormal behaviour.

PR: PSYC 3650. and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4660

Developmental Psychopathology

is a review of current theory and research related to the developmental course of maladaptive behaviours in children and adolescents. Topics will include behavioural, emotional and developmental disorders. Research concerning the role of individual, family, community and cultural factors will be discussed.

PR: PSYC 3650 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4661

Family Psychology

is a study of the reciprocal relationship between family processes and abnormal behaviour. The course will focus on the role of family dynamics in the etiology of abnormal behaviour, the impact of psychological disorders on family functioning and the application of family therapy to create therapeutic change.

PR: PSYC 3650, or all of 2520, 2570, 2911 and 3640 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4662

Clinical Psychology and Theories of Psychotherapy

- inactive course.

4670

Research Experience in Abnormal Psychology

allows students to gain research experience in selected areas of clinical psychology.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911 and 3650 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4671

Research Experience in Personality

allows students to gain experience in selected areas of personality research.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911 and 3620 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4701

Animal Behaviour II

(same as Biology 4701) is an examination of the behaviour of animals with particular emphasis on evolution and ecology. Topics include behavioural genetics and evolution, reproductive strategies, social behaviour, habitat selection, territoriality, foraging behaviour, and other topics in Biology and Psychology.

CR: Biology 4701

LH: one laboratory period weekly

PR: Biology 3750 or Psychology 3750

4750

Selected Topics in Animal Behaviour I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in animal behaviour.

PR: PSYC 3750 or Biology 3750 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4751

Selected Topics in Animal Behaviour II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in animal behaviour.

PR: PSYC 3750 or Biology 3750 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4770

Research Experience in Animal Behaviour

allows students to gain research experience in selected areas of animal behaviour.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911 and 3750 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4850

Selected Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience I

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in behavioural neuroscience.

PR: PSYC 2810; or 3800 or 3801 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4851

Selected Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience II

is an intensive examination of a specific topic in behavioural neuroscience.

PR: PSYC 2810; or 3800, or 3801 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4870

Research Experience in Neuroscience

allows students to gain research experience in selected areas of neuroscience.

PR: PSYC 2520, 2570, 2911, and either 3800 or 3801 and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience

4910

Systems in Contemporary Psychology

is a study of paradigms and explanations in contemporary psychology in the context of their historical antecedents.

PR: at the St. John’s campus, 30 credit hours in Psychology courses required in the majors program and admission to a Major in Psychology or Behavioural Neuroscience or, at the Grenfell campus, 30 credit hours in Psychology courses including Psychology 3950

499A and 499B

Honours Dissertation

is a linked course, based on independent study of an approved problem in Psychology. The topic will be chosen in consultation with the Faculty Advisor. The first semester will normally involve directed reading in this area, and preparation of a dissertation proposal. The second semester will be devoted to conducting the study, gathering data, data analysis and preparation of a formal written report. The dissertation must be submitted for grading before the end of the tenth week of the semester in which the student is registered for 499B.

CH: 6

PR: admission to the Honours Program

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).
8.10.3 Psychology Work Term Descriptions

The Following Work Terms are a requirement of the Psychology Co-op Program only.

199W

Work Term I

follows the successful completion of Semester 4. Students are expected to learn, develop and practice the high standards of behaviour and performance normally expected in the work environment. (A detailed description of each job is normally posted during the job competition.) As one component of the Work Term, the student is required to complete a work report. The work report, as a minimum requirement should:

  1. analyse an issue/problem related to the student’s work environment.

  2. demonstrate an understanding of the structure of a professional report, and show reasonable competence in written communication and presentation skills. (Students should consult the evaluation form provided in the placement package.)

Late reports will be graded as FAL unless prior permission for a late report has been given by the co-ordinator.

Seminars on professional development, conducted by the Division of Co-operative Education, are presented during Semester 4 to introduce and prepare the student for participation in the subsequent work terms. Topics may include among others, work term evaluation, work report writing, career planning, employment seeking skills, resume preparation, self employment, ethics and professional concepts, behavioural requirements in the work place, assertiveness in the work place and industrial safety.

299W

Work Term II

follows the successful completion of Semester 6. Students are expected to further develop and expand their knowledge and work-related skills and should be able to accept increased responsibility and challenge. In addition, students are expected to demonstrate an ability to deal with increasingly complex work-related concepts and problems. The work report, as a minimum requirement, should:

  1. analyse an issue/problem related to the student’s work environment and demonstrate an understanding of practical application of concepts relative to the student’s academic background

  2. demonstrate competence in creating a professional report, and

  3. show competence in written communication and presentation skills

Late reports will be graded as FAL unless prior permission for a late report has been given by the co-ordinator.

399W

Work Term III

follows the successful completion of Semester 7. Students should have sufficient academic grounding and work experience to contribute in a positive manner to the problem-solving and management processes needed and practiced in the work environment. Students should become better acquainted with their discipline of study, should observe and appreciate the attitudes, responsibilities, and ethics normally expected of professionals and should exercise greater independence and responsibility in their assigned work functions. The work report should reflect the growing professional development of the student and, as a minimum requirement, will:

  1. demonstrate an increased ability to analyse a significant issue/problem related to the student’s experience in the work environment

  2. demonstrate a high level of competence in producing a professional report, and

  3. show a high level of competence in written communication and presentation skills

Late reports will be graded as FAL unless prior permission for a late report has been given by the co-ordinator.

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).