News

Dr. Derek Wilton - Fellow of the RCGS

Dr. Derek Wilton's research is being highlighted on the Canadian Geographic website as a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. See what Derek and other RCGS Fellows are working on in 2018.

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Geophysics Student Recognized as Academic All-Canadian

Department of Earth Sciences geophysics Honours student, Joseph Pittman, was recently recognized as an Academic All-Canadian for his achievements in varsity track and field athletics while maintaining an 80+ average. In 1988, USPORTS introduced its first Academic All-Canadians, those exceptional student-athletes who achieve an academic standing of 80% or higher while playing on a university varsity team. On January 10th, the Sea-Hawks hosted their first event to celebrate the academic accomplishments of Memorial's student-athletes who have been named Academic All-Canadians. Only 39 students throughout the university received this honour.

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Dr. John M. Hanchar named University Research Professor

Dr. John M. Hanchar has been named University Research Professor in acknowledgement of his internationally recognized contributions as an earth scientist, for cultivating an innovative and cutting edge research program and for the incredible reach and impact of his scholarship.

Dr. Hanchar, professor and head, Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, and director of the Centre for Earth Resources Research, is a leader in his field whose research activities combine fieldwork, experiments and high precision analytical methods. He has made fundamental contributions in geochemistry, economic geology, condensed matter physics and materials science.

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Golden footprint - Earth sciences graduate student mapping ore deposits in real time

A Memorial graduate student is helping gold prospectors in Central Newfoundland zero in on new deposits — and fast.

Sam Ybarra, a master’s student in the Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, who hails from Columbus, Mississippi, is using infrared spectroscopy to collect mineralogical and geochemical data in real time.

Working with his supervisor, Dr. Steve Piercey, Mr. Ybarra has been mapping fluid rock, ore-forming footprints in Baie Verte, N.L., in partnership with Anaconda Mining.

Orogenic gold is formed when rocks along faults in the earth’s crust fracture and release water. As the fluid escapes, it scavenges gold from the rocks it passes and, when a favourable location is found, the gold is deposited.

The fizzy, carbon dioxide- and gold-bearing hot water also reacts with the rocks themselves, forming new minerals — a process called hydrothermal alteration.

 

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Golden footprint - Earth sciences graduate student mapping ore deposits in real time

A Memorial graduate student is helping gold prospectors in Central Newfoundland zero in on new deposits — and fast.

Sam Ybarra, a master’s student in the Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, who hails from Columbus, Mississippi, is using infrared spectroscopy to collect mineralogical and geochemical data in real time.

Working with his supervisor, Dr. Steve Piercey, Mr. Ybarra has been mapping fluid rock, ore-forming footprints in Baie Verte, N.L., in partnership with Anaconda Mining.

Orogenic gold is formed when rocks along faults in the earth’s crust fracture and release water. As the fluid escapes, it scavenges gold from the rocks it passes and, when a favourable location is found, the gold is deposited.

The fizzy, carbon dioxide- and gold-bearing hot water also reacts with the rocks themselves, forming new minerals — a process called hydrothermal alteration.

 

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Rare earth element research to aid in northern mining evaluation

Dr. Derek Wilton is collaborating with the Nunatsiavut Government on a project that has significant implications for resource evaluation in the Canadian Arctic and near Arctic.

The remote Strange Lake area in Northern Labrador contains a world-class rare earth element (REE) deposit. REEs are strategic minerals used in a variety of high-tech applications, ranging from computer and smartphone screens to super magnets.

“This deposit was discovered by the Iron Ore Company of Canada in the 1980s and it’s right on the border between Labrador and Quebec,” said Dr. Wilton, a professor in the Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science. “While they worked at it for a few years, they really couldn’t do anything with it because they didn’t know how to separate the elements from the minerals.”

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Earth Sciences

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Postal Address: P.O. Box 4200, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1C 5S7

Tel: (709) 864-8000