Research staff

Illustration of a herd of caribou running

Research Associates & Assistants

Sara Leah Hindy

Sara Leah Hindy

Research Assistant

Headshot of Nathaniel Pollock, Research Associate

Nathaniel Pollock, Ph.D., M.S.W.

Research Associate, Labrador Institute; Adjunct Professor, School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies

Postdoctoral Fellows

David Borish, Postdoctoral Fellow

David Borish, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies


Research Associates & Assistants

Headshot of Sara Leah Hindy, Research AssistantSara Leah Hindy
Research Assistant

Sara Leah Hindy is a Mi’kmaw teacher from Elmastukwek, Ktaqmkuk (Bay of Islands, Newfoundland) and a member of Qalipu First Nation. She studied at Memorial University where she completed her Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education. Sara Leah taught in schools within the Newfoundland and Labrador English School District and on the land as Education and Youth Team Lead for Qalipu First Nation. She worked under the guidance of Dr. Sylvia Moore in her roles as Regional Curriculum Resource Coordinator and Knowledge Mobilization Project Coordinator for the National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education. In her current work, as an Indigenous Liaison Advisor, she engages Indigenous communities and organizations throughout the Atlantic region and Inuit Nunangat on the collection and use of data for community planning. Sara Leah is returning to her studies in the Master of Education, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning program and looks forward to continuing her learning journey in Indigenous education.

Sara Leah is a mother of two sons, Oliver and Reid, who inspire her daily. Together, they enjoy spending quality time exploring and connecting with the land and the water.

Email: saraleahhindy@gmail.com

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Headshot of Nathaniel Pollock, Research AssociateNathaniel Pollock, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Research Associate
Adjunct Professor, School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies

Nathaniel (Settler, he/him) is a research associate in the School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies at the Labrador Institute. Through this role, he works collaboratively with Indigenous governments and health and social care agencies in Labrador and elsewhere in the Circumpolar North on research, post-secondary education, and program and policy development projects. Nathaniel completed a Master’s of Social Work at Carleton University and a Ph.D. in Community Health at Memorial University.

As an interdisciplinary public health scholar, Nathaniel uses mixed methods and community-based approaches to research. His interests include suicide prevention and mental health promotion, health services, and child and family health, particularly in rural, northern, and Indigenous communities. He previously taught courses in health research methods and northern and rural health, and has supervised graduate students in social work and public health.

Nathaniel is currently serving as the Vice President of the Canadian Society for Circumpolar Health and the International Union of Circumpolar Health. He lived in Happy Valley-Goose Bay from 2011 to 2017. He currently lives in St. John’s with his partner and three children.

To find Nathaniel’s research publications, visit: https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=j65NpCIAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao
Email: nathaniel.pollock@med.mun.ca
Twitter: @njpollock

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Postdoctoral Fellows

David Borish, Postdoctoral Fellow

David Borish, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies, Memorial University

David is currently a Post-Doctoral Fellow co-supervised by Dr. Ashlee Cunsolo at the Labrador Institute of Memorial University, and Dr. Sherilee Harper at the University of Alberta.

David is a visual-based social and health researcher pushing at the frontiers of using audio-visual methodologies to explore and understand relationships between humans and the environment. His skillset and interests sit at the interface of public health, cultural and social wellbeing, wildlife conservation, audio-visual and qualitative research methods, and documentary film. Through his PhD, David worked in partnership with Inuit from the Nunatsiavut and NunatuKavut regions to document, analyse, and communicate their relationship with caribou. He co-conducted over 80 conversational filmed interviews with Inuit participants across 11 communities in Labrador, which make up the foundation of an Inuit-led, feature-length documentary film that David has been working on, called HERD (to be released in 2021). He also developed an innovative data analytical strategy that repurposes video-editing software for qualitative inquiry, which allowed him to explore these filmed interviews in-depth. Through this methodological approach he has published in high impact journals, including Global Environmental Change and the International Journal of Qualitative Methods.

David is also the recipient of several awards, including a Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada Joseph-Armand Bombardier Doctoral Scholarship (2018), a National Geographic Wildlife Early Career Grant (2017), a Northern Scientific Training Program Grant (2017), and the University of Guelph’s Excellence in International Development Studies Prize recipient (2016). In addition to working with Inuit in Labrador, he has worked alongside a variety of communities in Malaysia, Kenya, Nepal, and Peru.

To learn more about David's film and photography work, visit: https://www.davidborishvisuals.com/
Email: dborish@mun.ca
Twitter:@_DavidBorish

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Contact

Labrador Institute

230 Elizabeth Ave, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1B 3X9

Postal Address: P.O. Box 4200, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1C 5S7

Tel: (709) 864-8000