Graduate students

Illustration of a herd of caribou running

David Finch's headshot

David Finch

PhD Candidate, Dept. of Archaeology, Memorial University; Archaeological Research Assistant, Partnered with Innu Nation (Summer 2021)

Claire Pratt's headshot

Claire Pratt

MD Candidate, Memorial University; Student Research Assistant (Summer 2021)

Bryn Tapper's headshot

Bryn Tapper

PhD Candidate, Dept. of Archaeology, Memorial University; GIS Technician, Partnered with Parks Canada (Summer 2021)


Graduate students

David Finch's headshot

David Finch
PhD Candidate, Dept. of Archaeology, Memorial University
Archaeological Research Assistant, Partnered with Innu Nation (Summer 2021)
Supervisor: Dr. Scott Neilsen

My research focuses on Innu cultural landscapes and heritage management in Labrador. The research program has been designed with the Innu Nation to document Innu perceptions of heritage management, centred on parks and cultural sites as they are at risk from development and climate change. Interviews with land managers and heritage specialists are paired with archaeological fieldwork in order to understand land use, exchange skills with Innu guardians, and build local capacity in cultural resource management.

My background includes archaeology, ethnography, and regulatory systems in Manitoba, Ontario, and the Northwest Territories. My past work has concerned the history of wildlife management and impacts upon northern Indigenous communities; ethnohistory and occupancy research for First Nations; mitigation of burials and Fur Trade sites affected by hydroelectric development; documentation of historic mining sites; and forensic investigations of murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls.

Email: dmfinch@mun.ca

Back to top

Claire Pratt's headshot

Claire Pratt
MD Candidate, Memorial University
Student Research Assistant (Summer 2021)
Supervisor: Dr. Nathaniel Pollock

Claire Pratt is a third-year medical student at Memorial University with a personal interest in vulnerable populations and psychiatry. Before pursuing medicine, Claire completed her undergraduate degree in Biology and a master’s degree in Clinical Epidemiology at MUN. Her previous research has been heavily involved in antimicrobial stewardship and as a result, she has participated in several projects that aim to reduce inappropriate treatment with antibiotics.

Beyond studying, Claire is involved in several extra-curriculars including the Food Tool Kit Project, planning skills nights and lunchtime talks for her class (including a virtual IUD insertion night and discussions on the health care needs of sex workers), and developing class representative roles to meet student’s needs. Despite these commitments, Claire spends most of her time thinking about her dog Stella, and how she is the cutest pupper in town (note: she is really stinkin' cute).

Through her work with the Labrador Institute, Claire expanded her focus from stewardship initiatives to mental health issues that are specific to the Newfoundland and Labrador population. She hopes that this research will help identify initiatives that will be beneficial to our population, as well as work to improve mental health services throughout the province.

Email: clp062@mun.ca

Back to top

Bryn Tapper's headshot

Bryn Tapper
PhD Candidate, Dept. of Archeology, Memorial University
GIS Technician, Partnered with Parks Canada (Summer 2021)
Supervisor: Dr. Scott Neilsen

My Ph.D. research focuses on the contents and contexts of the rock art of the Canadian Maritimes in order to discuss its role in Indigenous societies in the past.

Combining formal archaeological techniques (survey, computational photography and GIS analysis) with informed ethnohistorical and ethnographic data, the petroglyph sites are investigated at various scales - from motif, to panel, to site, to landscape setting - in order to articulate the different functional and ideological levels at which these phenomena operated. Such an approach may inform how traditional Indigenous concepts of landscape, the environs of the rock art site, the material conditions of the rock itself, as well as the content and composition of the images engraved, combine to make socially significant places in the landscape.

I hope that my research can contribute to narratives attempting to understand precontact Indigenous cultural life in the Maritimes, as well as how Mi'kmaq, Wolastoqiyik and Pestomuhkati First Nations of the region adapted to the arrival of Europeans from the 16th century onwards.

Email: bwpt48@mun.ca

Back to top


Contact

Labrador Institute

230 Elizabeth Ave, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1B 3X9

Postal Address: P.O. Box 4200, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1C 5S7

Tel: (709) 864-8000