Frequently Asked Questions

SECTION 1: NEWLY ADMITED STUDENTS

WHAT DOES TEMPORARY RESIDENT STATUS MEAN?


A temporary resident is a foreign national who is legally allowed to enter and remain in Canada for temporary purposes.
As a temporary resident, your immigration status might be one of the following:
• visitor
• student
• worker
• temporary resident permit holder


Depending on what you want to do while in Canada, you would need a different temporary resident status document. For example, you might need a study permit, work permit, temporary resident visa (TRV), visitor record, or a temporary resident permit.


WHO NEEDS STUDY PERMIT?


A study permit is a piece of paper that gives you permission to study and remain in Canada. To get a study permit, you first need an offer of admission to an institution that has been approved by the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to host International students. Approved schools/institutions have a Designated Learning Institution Number (DLI). Memorial University's DLI is O19440995346.


In general, if you are not a permanent resident or Citizen of Canada (so you are a foreign national) and you intend to study in Canada, you will need to apply for a study permit. There are a few exceptions.

A foreign national can study without a study permit in Canada under the following conditions:
• Duration of course or program of studies is six months or less and will be completed within the period of stay authorized upon entry into Canada.
• E.g. If visiting on exchange and only studying at our university for one semester (four months), the foreign national will not need to apply for a study permit.
• Only engaging in distance-learning courses.
• Auditing courses (typically by sitting in on an academic course, but without obtaining credit for it, or having the ability to obtain credit for it retroactively).
• Minor inside of Canada.


To learn more about who needs a study permit and who does not, please visit Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).

WHO NEEDS A TRV (VISA) OR eTA?


A Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) is a sticker placed inside of your passport. It can either be single-entry (allows you to enter Canada one time) or multiple-entry (allows you to enter Canada multiple times). It is also referred as entry VISA or simply VISA.


An Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) is automatically tied to your passport number. There is no sticker or document though you will receive a confirmation email once you complete the online request.
Depending on what country you are from, you may require either a TRV or an eTA to enter or transit through Canada. To find out which document you need, use this immigration tool.

CAN I APPLY FOR STUDY PERMIT/VISA FROM THE PORT OF ENTRY?


Most foreign nationals cannot apply for their study permits at the border. They must apply for them before they arrive in Canada. There are only a few exceptions.


A foreign national may apply for a study permit when entering Canada if they are one of the following:
• A national or a permanent resident of the United States.
• A person who has been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence.
• A resident of Greenland.
• A resident of St. Pierre and Miquelon.


If one of the situations above apply to you, then you can fill out the study permit application and make payment at any port of entry that offers immigration services. Toronto Pearson Airport has an immigration office. For a list of Canada Border Services Agency offices that offer Immigration Services, visit the CBSA website.


For the complete regulations on applying upon entry, visit Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.

CAN I APPLY FOR STUDY PERMIT FROM WITHIN CANADA?


A foreign national may only apply for a study permit when they are in Canada if the fall under one of the categories below:
• The foreign national already has a valid Canadian study permit or is applying within 90 days of when their old permit expired.
• The foreign national already has a valid work permit or is applying within 90 days of when their work permit expired.
• The foreign national is a temporary resident who:
- Is studying at the preschool, primary or secondary level.
- Is a visiting or exchange student who is studying at a designated learning institution.
- Has completed a course or program of study that is a prerequisite to their enrolling at a designated learning institution.

If you have recently completed high school or an English language school in Canada, you may be eligible to apply for your study permit from within Canada.


For the complete regulations on applying from within Canada, visit Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.


I AM 17, DO I NEED A CUSTODIAN TO STUDY AT MUN?


In Newfoundland and Labrador the age when a person becomes an adult is 19 (the age of majority). A person under the age of majority is considered to be a “minor child”.


If you are 18 y.o. when you are applying for a Canadian study permit to attend a school in Newfoundland and Labrador, it is at the discretion of an immigration officer to determine whether you need to submit a custodianship declaration.


If you are younger than 18, when you are applying for a study permit you must have a custodian in Canada. A custodian is a responsible adult, who is a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident. To appoint a custodian, you will need to support your study permit application with the Custodianship Declaration form (PDF, 1.02 MB).


This is a two pages document: the first page needs to be signed by the custodian and notarized (certified by a lawyer or notary) in Canada; the second page needs to be signed by the parents or legal guardians of the minor child and notarized in their home country.


Memorial University of Newfoundland does not provide custodianship services, however, if you do not have relatives or friends in Canada you may contact companies in NL that provide custodianship services to international students.

DO I NEED A COVER LETTER FOR MY STUDY PERMIT APPLICATION?


It is recommended to support your study permit application with a cover letter. This document is also may be known as a letter of explanation or a study plan letter. The letter will help an immigration officer to determine whether you are eligible to study in Canada or not, based on your educational background, travel history, financial status and employment history, ties to your home country, purpose of visit and other factors. We developed the Cover Letter tool document to help our students with cover letter preparation. Please use this tool to clarify any information that may be important and needs to be considered to assess your application or explain any gaps.

HOW MUCH MONEY DO I NEED TO HAVE TO APPLY FOR A CANADIAN STUDY PERMIT?


Once you have received a Letter of Acceptance from MUN you need to start working on your Study Permit application and supporting documents. It is important to prove that you meet financial requirements without working in Canada. An officer will review your financial documents to determine if adequate financial resources are available to support the applicant and any accompanying family members for the first year of the course of study.


Normally you need to show $10,000 for twelve-month period, prorated at $833 per month, plus cost of tuition for one year. As your proof of funding you may use the following documents:
• Bank Statement for the last 4 months
• Bank Letter confirming funds available in your bank account
• Financial support letter from your parents or other person who supports you financially for your studies in Canada
• Scholarship letter
• Employment letter
• Other documents confirming available funds.


Students who are coming with accompanying family members:
• Spouse/common-law partner/first family member base-$4,000 for twelve-month period prorated at $333 per month.
• Dependent child/subsequent family member base-$3,000 for twelve-month period per dependent child of any age, prorated at $255 per month.


WHAT IS THE PROCESSING TIME FOR STUDY PERMIT APPLICATION?


Processing times vary, depending on whether you apply from inside or outside of Canada.
View application processing times


What are you applying for?
• visiting, studying, working temporarily


Which temporary residence application?
• Study Permit (if made outside of Canada)
• Study Permit Extension (if made inside of Canada)

SECTION 2: CURRENT STUDENTS


CAN I WORK IN CANADA IF I AM AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT?


As an international student at MUN you do not need to apply for a work permit.
You can work on-campus, if you are:
• Studying as a fulltime student at MUN
You can work off-campus, if you are:
• holding a valid study permit;
• full-time students enrolled at MUN (except ESL program and exchange student)
• your program of study is at least 6 months in duration and leads to a degree, diploma or certificate
Please remember, you will need to obtain a Social Insurance Number (SIN) when you arrive in Canada before you start working as a student.

HOW MANY HOURS CAN I WORK?


As an undergraduate student you may be eligible:
• work part-time up to 20 hrs / week during academic sessions
• work full-time work up to 40 hrs / week during scheduled breaks (e.g. summer or winter break)
• Students who have maintained full-time status for the duration of their program of study, and who only require a part-time course load in their final academic session in order to complete their program of study, may work off-campus up to 20 hrs / week during their final academic session.
As a graduate student you may be eligible to work off-campus only up to 20 hrs / week.

DO I NEED A WORK PERMIT IF MY PROGRAM HAS A CO-OP COMPONENT?


Some programs include work experience as part of their curriculum. You may apply for a co-op or intern work permit if:
• you have a valid study permit
• working is required to complete your study program in Canada
• you have a letter from your school that confirms all students in your program need to complete work placements to get their degree
• your co-op or internship is 50% or less of the total program of study

You aren’t eligible for a co-op work permit if you are studying:
• English or French as a second language (ESL/FSL) or
• General interest courses or courses to prepare for another study program.

In these cases, you need to get a valid work permit to work in Canada.

WHAT HAPPENS IF MY STUDY PERMIT EXPIRES?


SCENARIO 1: YOU APPLY FOR A NEW STATUS DOCUMENT BEFORE YOUR PREVIOUS DOCUMENT EXPIRES
IMPLIED STATUS


Implied status means the applicant has the right to continue studying or working under the same conditions of their previous permit until a decision is made on their application for extension or renewal. Implied status only applies as long as the person remains in Canada. The relevant Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations are R185, R186(u) and R189.
For details, visit the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) section on implied status.


SCENARIO 2: YOU APPLY FOR A NEW STATUS DOCUMENT AFTER YOUR PREVIOUS DOCUMENT EXPIRES


If your study permit expires before you apply for a new status document, you have fallen out of status. You must now apply for a restoration of status.


RESTORATION OF STATUS
If a worker or student has lost their status, they have 90 days to apply to restore their status. It also means they cannot work or study until they receive their new status document.
For more information on restoration of status, visit the IRCC website.

CAN I STUDY WHILE I WAIT FOR THE NEW STUDY PERMIT?


It depends on when you applied to extend your study permit.


SCENARIO 1: APPLY FOR A NEW STATUS DOCUMENT BEFORE YOUR PREVIOUS DOCUMENT EXPIRES
If Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) receives your application before it expires, you have implied status until a decision is made on your application. That means you, as the applicant, have the right to continue studying or working under the same conditions of your previous permit until a decision is made on your application for extension or renewal.
Implied status only applies as long as the person remains in Canada. If you leave Canada while on implied status and return, you have given up your right to implied status and must wait for your new permit before you can study or work again.
The relevant Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations are R185, R186(u) and R189. For details, visit the IRCC's section on implied status.


SCENARIO 2: APPLY FOR A NEW STATUS DOCUMENT AFTER YOUR PREVIOUS DOCUMENT EXPIRES

If IRCC receives your application after your existing status document (study permit) expires, you have fallen out of status, which means you cannot work or study until you have a new status document. It also means you must not only apply to extend your status document, but must also pay an additional fee to restore your status. If you have fallen out of status, you have 90 days to apply to restore your status; otherwise, you cannot restore your status from within Canada and must apply for a new study or work permit from outside of Canada.

Visit IRCC for more information on restoration of status.

WHAT STUDY PERMIT CONDITIONS I MUST FOLLOW AND WHAT HAPPENS IF I FAIL TO COMPLY?


According to R220.1(1), holders of study permits in Canada are subject to the following conditions:
• They shall enrol at a designated learning institution and remain enrolled at a designated learning institution until they complete their studies.
• They shall actively pursue their course or program of study.

According to R221, a study permit will not be issued to a foreign national who has worked or studied in Canada without authorization or to a foreign national who previously had a permit and failed to comply with the conditions of their permit (e.g. remained in Canada on their permit while not enrolled at a designated learning institution).

Students who go on academic suspension are at risk of failing to comply with R220.1(1), since suspension means they are not enrolled for at least two semesters. Students who are on probation and facing suspension should contact international@mun.ca and schedule an appointment to discuss their immigration options.

I have valid US visa and valid Canadian study permit. However, my Canadian visa has expired. Can I travel to the US and reenter Canada?

If you have a valid study permit or work permit, or hold valid visitor status in Canada, and you leave Canada and visit only the United States, you do not need a valid Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) to re-enter Canada, provided you return to Canada by the end of the authorized period of your stay in Canada. [See the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, Part 9, Division 5, Section 190(3)(f)].

If you are on implied status and need to travel to the United States, see an international student advisor before traveling.


WHAT IS THE IMMIGRATION CONSEQUENCES FOR ACADEMIC SUSPENSION?


As detailed in the section Imposed conditions and failure to comply, any student who has a study permit must follow certain conditions. One of the conditions is that they will enrol in and stay enrolled in school. Memorial University is required to report on the enrolment status of its international students to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). When students are placed on academic suspension, they are no longer enrolled as a student. The university will report your academic suspension status to IRCC.


Students who go on academic suspension are at risk of failing to comply with R220.1(1) since suspension means they are not enrolled for at least two semesters. Students who are on probation and facing suspension should contact international@mun.ca and schedule an appointment to discuss their immigration options.

SECTION 3: Employers 

What documents can confirm students' eligibility to work in Canada?

  • A valid study permit confirming student can work on and off-campus
  • Social Insurance Number

How many hours may students work off-campus for?

Undergraduate students

Part-time work: up to 20 hrs / week during academic sessions.
Full-time work: up to 40 hrs / week during scheduled breaks (e.g. summer or winter break.) 
Students who have maintained full-time status for the duration of their program of study, and who only require a part-time course load in their final academic session in order to complete their program of study, may work off-campus up to 20 hrs / week during their final academic session.

Graduate students

Can work off-campus only up to 20 hrs / week. There is no scheduled break for graduate students and as a result they are not eligible to work fulltime during the entire course of their studies. 

Are graduates eligible to work while they are waiting to receive their post-graduation work permit?

As per paragraph R186(w) of Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, graduates who apply for a work permit, such as a post-graduation work permit, before the expiry of their study permit are eligible to work full time without a work permit while waiting for a decision on their application if all of the following apply:
• They are or were the holders of a valid study permit at the time of the post-graduation work permit application.
• They have completed their program of study.
• They met the requirements for working off campus without a work permit under paragraph R186(v) (that is, they were a full-time student enrolled at a DLI in a post-secondary academic, vocational or professional training program of at least 6 months in duration that led to a degree, diploma or certificate).
• They did not exceed the allowable hours of work under paragraph R186(v).

If full-time undegraduate students are taking courses during the summer (regularly scheduled break), can they still work full-time?
Undergraduate students who are enrolled full-time during the academic sessions before and after a regularly scheduled break, and who decided to undertake a full-time or part-time course load during that regularly scheduled break, are eligible to work off-campus on a full-time basis.

If students have just finished a program, are off for the summer, and are starting another program at the same or at a different educational institution in the fall, can they work full-time during the summer?

Yes, if the students:

  • Were full-time students before they finished the program, and will remain full-time students when they start the new program.
  • Both educational institutions are DLI institutions (designated learning institutions).
  • They have a valid study permit, or they submitted an application to change conditions, extend their stay, or remain in Canada as a student before their current study permit expired.
  • The break between the two programs is no longer than 150 days.

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN REVIEWED BY
Nikolay Tupikov RCIC, R517405
Abu Arif, RISIA, S701415

Contact

Internationalization Office

230 Elizabeth Ave, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1B 3X9

Postal Address: P.O. Box 4200, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1C 5S7

Tel: (709) 864-8000