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Dr. Hélène Paradis

{Dr. Hélène Paradis}
Dr. Hélène Paradis

Assistant professor,
Basic Medical Sciences
Faculty of Medicine

Research Interests
Dr. Hélène Paradis is particularly interested in the molecular processes linking developmental biology to cancer. She and her colleague, Dr. Robert Gendron, have identified a novel regulatory type factor, tubedown-1, present at high level during fetal development in tissues such as bone, blood and blood vessels. "After birth, the detection of this factor is not observable in most tissues," explained Dr. Paradis. "But we have discovered that it is also present at high levels in pediatric bone tumours and in some neuroblastomas. Treatment of these cancers is difficult and can require highly toxic therapy that can predispose these children to secondary cancers later in life."

Experience
Drs. Paradis and Gendron have determined that tubedown-1 is important for the growth of experimental Ewing's sarcoma, a type of bone cancer. "We hope that research into natural molecules such as tubedown-1, that control the growth of cancers, can one day be used to design less toxic treatments," she said. Dr. Paradis' work in the role of tybedown-1 in pediatric tumours is funded by the Childrens Oncology Group through a grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

Background
Born in Montreal, Dr. Paradis earned her PhD at the University of Montreal in molecular biology and did a postdoctoral fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. She then accepted a faculty position at the University of Cincinnati, where she worked for the last several years developing her current research projects.