Electives Without Prerequisites

 Here are the first year courses available in the Faculty of Science, along with the general-interest science courses available for study as electives without prerequisites. 


 Biochemistry


2600 Introduction to Human Nutrition - (same as Human Kinetics 2600) gives an overview of human nutrition with an emphasis on topics of current interest. Students will gain an understanding of nutrition in the context of health maintenance across the life span. Topics covered will include nutrition during pregnancy, nutrition for infants, Canadian Recommended Nutrient Intakes / Dietary Reference Intakes, weight loss and weight gain, nutriceuticals and ergogenic aids.

CR: Human Kinetics 2600 or the former Kinesiology 2600

PR: None


Biology


1001 Principles of Biology - is an introduction to the science of Biology, including a discussion of the unity, diversity and evolution of living organisms.

LH: 3

PR: Science 1807

1002 Principles of Biology - is an introduction to the science of Biology, including a discussion of the unity, diversity and evolution of living organisms.

LH: 3

PR: Science 1807; BIOL 1001

2040 Modern Biology and Human Society I - Examines various aspects of the human body, and the implications of modern biological research for human beings. Topics include cancer; diet and nutrition and associated diseases; circulatory disease, immunity, human genetics, biorhythms, new diseases, genetic engineering and reproductive engineering.

PR: None

2041 Modern Biology and Human Society II- Examines the origins and consequences of the environmental crisis of the 20th century. Topics include the population explosion, energy, material cycles, air and water and land pollution, global food supplies, the fisheries, wildlands, renewable and non-renewable resources, environmental ethics.

PR: None

2120 Biology for Students of Earth Sciences - is an introduction of the principles of Biology for students in Earth Sciences. Topics will include principles of classification, levels of biological organization, fundamental characteristics of living organisms and basic concepts in ecology.

CR: BIOL 1001 or 1002

LH: 3

PR: Science 1807; Earth Science major; Earth Sciences 1001 or 1002 or permission of the Head of Department.


Chemistry


1010 Introductory Chemistry I- Examines descriptive chemistry; atomic structure; chemical bonding; periodicity illustrated by the chemistry of selected elements; mole concept and stoichiometry; physical properties of matter; energetics; rates of reaction; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry.

CR: CHEM 1200

LH: 3 hours biweekly alternating with tutorials

PR: Science 1807. It is recommended that students have at least 70% in high school Academic Mathematics 3204, or a pass in any university level mathematics course.

1011 Introductory Chemistry II - examines atomic structure; periodic properties; chemical bonding including VSEPR shapes and polarity; introduction to valence bond theory and hybridization; liquids, solids and intermolecular forces; solubility equilibrium; electrochemistry.

CR: CHEM 1001 and CHEM 1051

LH: 3 hours biweekly alternating with tutorials

PR: Science 1807; CHEM 1010

1050 General Chemistry I - builds on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include gases; thermochemistry; atomic structure; periodic properties; chemical bonding including valence bond theory; hybridization and introduction to molecular orbital theory; properties of liquids and solids.

CR: CHEM 1200

LH: 3

PR: Science 1807; CHEM 1010 with a grade of at least 60% or high school CHEM 3202 with a grade of at least 65%. It is also recommended that students have successfully completed high school Mathematics 3200 or 3201.

1051 General Chemistry II - builds on CHEM 1050 topics and on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include solutions, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, equilibria involving acids and bases including polyprotic acids, buffers, acid-base indicators, titration curves, solubility and complex ion equilibrium, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.

CR: CHEM 1001 and CHEM 1011

LH: 3

PR: Science 1807; CHEM 1050 (or Chemistry 1200 with a minimum grade of 65%)


Computer Science


1000 Computer Science – An Introduction - is a gentle introduction to computer science. In a breadth-first overview approach it discusses important aspects of computer science including fundamentals in algorithms, binary data representation, Boolean logic and its implementation, machine architecture, systems software, networking concepts, programming languages, databases, and selected Computer Science subfields.

CR: COMP 1700

LH: 3

PR: None

1400 Computing in the 20th Century and Beyond - will give an overview of the development of computing technologies over the last 75 years as well as both the perception of these technologies by, and their impact on, society. The course will be organized chronologically by decade, and within each decade will examine the dominant computing developments, their image in various print and pictorial media, and their social impact. The aim is to give students of all disciplines an appreciation of the abilities and limitations of computer technology and how such technologies interact with society.

PR: None

1401 Computing at the Movies - will both examine and counter common misconceptions about computing and the computing profession. This will be done by contrasting depictions of various aspects of computing in various movies and documentaries produced over the last 60 years with the reality of these aspects as given in selected readings and course lecture notes.

PR: None

1600 Basic Computing and Information Technology - offers an overview of information technology. It provides students with an understanding of basic concepts and necessary skills required to use spreadsheet, database and presentation software to manage, analyze, and present data.

CR: the former Business 2700, the former COMP 2650 and the former COMP 2801

LH: 3

PR: None

2000 Collaborative and Emergent Behaviour - is a survey of computation as a means of understanding, modelling, and describing artificial and natural systems. The emergence of complex behaviour from the interaction of simple rules governing individual components is illustrated and discussed, as well as the role of communication between system components. Selected systems to be studied will be drawn from different topic areas which may include the worldwide web, the mind (cognitive science), formal logic, autonomous robotics, chaos and fractals, and bioinformatics. Each topic will incorporate an associated laboratory experience.

LH: 3 hours bi-weekly

PR: None


Earth Sciences


1000 Earth Systems - is a survey of the structure, function and interrelations of Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Topics include an exploration of the physical and chemical properties of planetary materials, forces driving and sustaining Earth systems, and biological modifiers (including humankind) on the Earth today.

LH: 3

PR: None

2150 The Solar System - describes the basic astronomy of the Solar System, tracing the search to understand motion of the Sun, Moon and planets in the sky; modern observations of planets, moons, comets, asteroids and meteorites and what they tell us about the origin and evolution of the Solar System.

PR: None

2916 Natural Hazards on a Dynamic Earth - describes the surface of the Earth being in a constant state of change, thereby posing risks and challenges for society. A basic understanding of geological processes in the past and present provides some context for appreciating the risks related to earthquakes, volcanic activity and mass movements, challenges related to water resources, land-use planning and waste disposal, and some background to interpret sources and consequences of climate change. The course will provide a broad perspective on contemporary issues facing society. This course is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to prospective teachers.

CR: Environmental Science 2360

PR: None

2917 Gems: The Science and Politics - introduces students to precious and semi-precious stones both from the perspective of their nature and origin and from the perspectives of geography and the socio-political issues of mining, recovery, trade and cartels. The properties that confer value upon gems (colour, clarity, cut and carat), the techniques used to enhance, fake and imitate gems and the techniques used to detect fraudulent “gems” will be covered. The course will include discussion of the diamond industry in Canada and consideration of some famous gems. This course is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers.

PR: None

2918 Earth's Story - is an overview of Earth's dynamic past of episodes of supercontinent collision and breakup, massive flooding, global warming and freezing, magnetic field reversals and continents travelling over large distances. The evolution of life is tied to this history and has had equally dramatic turns of rich growth and catastrophic extinction. Discussion will be based on Canadian geology and includes an introduction to techniques used to decipher the rock record.

PR: None


Math and Statistics


1000 Calculus I - is an introduction to differential calculus, including algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Applications include kinematics, related rates problems, curve sketching and optimization.

CR: the former MATH 1081

PR: MATH 1090 or 109B or a combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the Department

1001 Calculus II - is an introduction to integral calculus, including Riemann sums, techniques of integration and improper integrals. Applications include exponential growth and decay, areas between curves and volumes of solids of revolution.

PR: MATH 1000 or the former MATH 1081

1050 Finite Mathematics I- Covers topics which include sets, logic, permutations, combinations and elementary probability.

CR: MATH 1052 and MATH 1053

PR: a combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or MATH 103F

1051 Finite Mathematics II- Covers topics which include elementary matrices, linear programming, elementary number theory, mathematical systems, and geometry.

CR: MATH 1052 and MATH 1053

PR: a combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or MATH 103F

1090 Algebra and Trigonometry - provides students with the essential prerequisite elements for the study of an introductory course in calculus. Topics include algebra, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, polynomials, and rational functions.

CR: if previously completed or currently registered for MATH 1000, 1001, 109A/B, the former 1080, or the former 1081

PR: a combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the Department, or the former MATH 103F

109A and 109B: Introductory Algebra and Trigonometry - is a two-semester course which provides students with the essential prerequisite elements for the study of an introductory course in calculus, at a slower pace than MATH 1090. Topics include algebra, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, polynomials, and rational functions.

CR: if previously completed or currently registered for MATH 1000, 1001, 1090, the former 1080, or the former 1081

PR: a combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the Department

2050 Linear Algebra I - includes the topics: Euclidean n-space, vector operations in 2- and 3-space, complex numbers, linear transformations on n-space, matrices, determinants, and systems of linear equations.

PR: A combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the Department or 3 credit hours in first year Mathematics courses.

1510 Statistical Thinking and Concepts - examines the basic statistical issues encountered in everyday life, such as data collection (both primary and secondary), ethical issues, planning and conducting statistically-designed experiments, understanding the measurement process, data summarization, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic concepts of probability, understanding sampling distributions, the central limit theorem based on simulations (without proof), linear regression, concepts of confidence intervals and testing of hypotheses. Statistical software will be used to demonstrate each technique.

CR: cannot receive credit for STAT 1510 if completed with, or subsequent to, STAT 2500, 2550 or the former 2510

LH: one 90 minute lab per week

PR: Mathematics 1090 or 109B or a combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the Department.

2500 Statistics for Business and Arts Students - covers descriptive statistics (including histograms, stem-and-leaf plots and box plots), elementary probability, random variables, the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, sampling distribution, estimation and hypothesis testing including both one and two sample tests, paired comparisons, correlation and regression, related applications.

CR: STAT 2550, the former 2510, Psychology 2910, 2925 and the former 2900

LH: one 90 minute lab per week. Statistical computer package will be used in the laboratory, but no prior computing experience is assumed

PR: Mathematics 1000 or 6 credit hours in first year courses in Mathematics or registration in at least semester three of a Bachelor of Nursing program or permission of the Head of Department


Ocean Sciences


1000 Exploration of the World Ocean - is an introductory course covering the major ocean sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, physics) at a level sufficient for science majors but accessible to non-science majors. It explores phenomena occurring from the shoreline to the abyss and from equatorial to polar regions. It also examines principles of marine ecology as well as how the marine environment affects humans and vice versa. The course is offered in a blended format that combines face-to-face lectures and online interactive activities in the form of virtual oceanographic expeditions.

PR: None


Physics and Physical Oceanography


1020 Introductory Physics I - is a non-calculus based introduction to mechanics. This course may be completed by someone who has no physics background provided some extra effort is made.

CO: Mathematics 1090

PR: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090. It is recommended that students have completed at least one of level II and level III high school physics courses

1021 Introductory Physics II - is an algebra-based introduction to oscillations, fluids, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and circuits.

PR: PHYS 1020 or 1050, Mathematics 1090 or 109B or 1000, Science 1807

1050 General Physics I: Mechanics - is a calculus-based introduction to mechanics. The course emphasizes problem solving, beginning with a review of vectors and one-dimensional kinematics. The main part of the course covers motion in two dimensions, forces and Newton’s Laws, energy, momentum, rotational motion and torque, and finally oscillations.

CO: Mathematics 1000

PR: Mathematics 1000 and Science 1807

1051 General Physics II: Oscillations, Waves, Electromagnetism - is a calculus-based introduction to oscillations, wave motion, and electromagnetism. Topics include: simple harmonic motion; travelling waves, sound waves, and standing waves; electric fields and potentials; magnetic forces and fields; electric current and resistance; and electromagnetic waves.

CO: Mathematics 1001

LH: 3

PR: PHYS 1050, or 1021, or 1020 (with a minimum grade of 70%), Mathematics 1001, Science 1807


Psychology


1000 Introduction to Psychology - is the first half of a two-semester introduction to Psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include history, research methodology, behavioural neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, and memory.

PR: None

1001 Introduction to Psychology - is the second half of a two-semester introduction to Psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include emotion, motivation, stress and health, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment, and social psychology.

PR: PSYC 1000


CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LH = Laboratory hours per week; PR = Prerequisite(s).

Further information can be found in the Calendar at the following link:

http://www.mun.ca/regoff/calendar/sectionNo=SCI-2563

Contact

Faculty of Science

230 Elizabeth Ave, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1B 3X9

Postal Address: P.O. Box 4200, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1C 5S7

Tel: (709) 864-8000