Electives Without Prerequisites

 

 


Biology


1001 Principles of Biology-Is an introduction to the science of Biology, including a discussion of the unity, diversity and evolution of living organisms.

LH 3
LC 3

1002 Principles of Biology is an introduction to the science of Biology, including a discussion of the unity, diversity and evolution of living organisms.
LC: 3
PR: BIOL 1001

2040 Modern Biology and Human Society I- Examines various aspects of the human body, and the implications of modern biological research for human beings. Topics include cancer; diet and nutrition and associated diseases; circulatory disease, immunity, human genetics, biorhythms, new diseases, genetic engineering and reproductive engineering.

UL: not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programs in Biology

2041 Modern Biology and Human Society II- Examines the origins and consequences of the environmental crisis of the 20th century. Topics include the population explosion, energy, material cycles, air and water and land pollution, global food supplies, the fisheries, wildlands, renewable and non-renewable resources, environmental ethics.

UL: not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programs in Biology


Chemistry


1010 Introductory Chemistry I- Examines descriptive chemistry; atomic structure; chemical bonding; periodicity illustrated by the chemistry of selected elements; mole concept and stoichiometry; physical properties of matter; energetics; rates of reaction; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry.

AR: attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course

PR: It is recommended that students have at least 70% in high school Academic Mathematics 3204, or a pass in any university level mathematics course.

1050 General Chemistry I- Has topics that will be similar to CHEM 1010/1011 but will be treated in greater depth with an emphasis on problem solving.

AR: attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.

PR: at least 75% in high school CHEM 3202 and successful completion of high school Advanced Mathematics 3205 and Mathematics 1000 which may be taken concurrently with CHEM 1050.

1011 Introductory Chemistry II- examines descriptive chemistry; atomic structure; chemical bonding; periodicity illustrated by the chemistry of selected elements; mole concept and stoichiometry; physical properties of matter; energetics; rates of reaction; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry. AR: attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course. LC: 4 LH: 3

PR: CHEM 1010

1051 General Chemistry II- has topics that will be similar to 1010/1011 but will be treated in greater depth with an emphasis on problem solving.

AR: attendance is required in the laboratory component of this course. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.

PR: CHEM 1050 and Mathematics 1000


Computer Science


1510 An Introduction to Programming for Scientific Computing-Those who are interested in learning a programming language, as well as various numerical methods relevant to scientific computing. Numerical methods to solve selected problems from Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics will be covered.

PR: Mathematics 1000

1550 Introduction to Multimedia Application Development- Is an introduction to programming and computer science with emphasis on the development of multimedia applications. The course introduces the fundamental principes of programing, including object-oriented and event-driven programming. Successful students will understand how to use and create classes and metods and combine them with multimedia libraries to produce animmations, handle input keyboard and mouse, and import sounds and videos to produce multimedia applications which can be directly deported on the Internet. This course includes a two-hour weekly lab requirment.

PR: None

1600 Basic Computing and Information Technology- Offers an overview of computers and information technology. It provides students with the knowledge necessary to answer questions, such as: What is a computer system? How does it work? How is it used? This is done through the use of popular spreadsheet, word processing and database software packages and the Internet. Social issues and implications will also be included.

PR: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090, which can be taken concurrently.

1700 Introduction to Computer Science- Lays the foundation for the art and the science of computing. The course contains fundamental and topical issues in computers, languages, programming and applications. This course is designed for potential Computer Science majors without a background in programming, but is also available for non majors.

CO: Mathematics 1090 (or equivalent), or Mathematics 1000

PR: Mathematics 1090 (or equivalent), or Mathematics 1000

2000 Collaborative and Emergent Behaviour- Does an ant colony behave intelligently? How do our genes 'program' us? Is the human mind a kind of a compuer? This course is not about computer programming. It's about how computing helps us understand patterns in nature( such as biological growth and the mind), and helps us understand the world we bulid ( such as robots and the Internet). From swarming robots, growing imaginary plants, unwiring the Internet or trying to decide if a computer "means" anything when it communicates, we'll give you a new challengage every couple of weeks and new ways to explore them in the lab. This cousre includes a three-hour biweekly lab requirement

PR: None

2650 Problem-Solving with Personal Computers- Is an overview of tools and techniques that current computer technology offers in a PC based networked environment. The emphases are on conceptual understanding of the software, from exploring capabilities of the existing software tools to learning methods of extending these capabilities. The key topics include problem-solving strategies, visual programming, macro-language operations, object linking and embedding, digital communication, and developing interactive web pages. The course has a practical flavour. In structured laboratory sessions, students gain proficiency in using personal computers for solving common problems.

CO: Mathematics 1000

PR: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1000 or Mathematics 1090 (or equivalent)


Earth Science


1000 Earth Systems- Is a survey of the structure, function and interrelations of Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Topics include an exploration of the physical and chemical properties of planetary materials, forces driving and sustaining Earth systems, and biological modifiers (including humankind) on the Earth today. Has a three-hour weekly lab

LH: 3

2150 The Solar System- Describes the basic astronomy of the Solar System, tracing the search to understand motion of the Sun, Moon and planets in the sky; modern observations of planets, moons, comets, asteroids and meteorites and what they tell us about the origin and evolution of the Solar System.

UL: not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programs in Earth Sciences

2914 The Earth's Energy Resources: Past, Present and Future- Provides a scientific analysis of the Earth's energy resources. The history of human exploitation of them; consequences for quality of life, and political and economic power; scenarios for the future. This course is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers.

UL: not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programs in Earth Sciences.

2916 Natural Hazards on a Dynamic Earth- Describes the surface of the Earth being in a constant state of change, thereby posing risks and challenges for society. An understanding of geological processes in the past and present provides context for evaluating risks related to earthquakes, volcanic activity and mass movements, challenges related to water resources, land-use planning and waste disposal, and the background to interpret sources and consequences of climate change. The course will provide a broad perspective on contemporary issues facing society. This course is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers.

UL: not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programs in Earth Sciences.

2917 Gems- The science and politics introduces students to precious and semi-precious stones both from the perspective of their nature and origin and from the perspectives of geography and the socio-political issues of mining, recovery, trade and cartels. The properties that confer value upon gems (colour, clarity, cut and carat), the techniques used to enhance, fake and imitate gems and the techniques used to detect fraudulent “gems” will be covered. The course will include discussion of the diamond industry in Canada and consideration of some famous gems. This course is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers.

UL: not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programs in Earth Sciences.

2918 Earth's Story- Is an overview of Earth's dynamic past of episodes of supercontinent collision and breakup, massive flooding, global warming and freezing, magnetic field reversals and continents travelling over large distances. The evolution of life is tied to this history and has had equally dramatic turns of rich growth and catastrophic extinction. Discussion will be based on Canadian geology and includes an introduction to techniques used to decipher the rock record.

UL: not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programs in Earth Sciences.


Economics


2010 Introduction to Microeconomics I- Examines scarcity and opportunity cost. Demand and supply. Elasticity. Household demand: marginal utility. Household demand: indifference curves. Production functions. Short-run and long-run cost functions. Perfect competition in the short run and the long run. Monopoly.

2020 Introduction to Macroeconomics- Covers national income accounting, aggregate income analysis, money, banking and foreign trade.


Geography


1050 Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Geography- Focuses on five areas in geography which continue through courses in other years of the geography program: physical, cultural, economic, resources, and geographic information sciences. The lectures are linked to assignments, which provide both experience in the application of geographical skills and develop insight into the presence of geography at both the local and global scales.

3350 Community and Regional Planning and Development- Introduces students to regional planning and development theories, techniques and approaches. Understanding of networks of development actors at community and regional scales, methods of delineating regions, links between theory and practice in planning and development. Focus on Canadian experiences and a sustainable development perspective.

PR: GEOG 2302or permission of the instructor.

4300 World Fisheries- Current Discourse and Future Directions is a seminar course on the key concepts, principles and challenges in fisheries resources worldwide. Topics of discussion include the state of world fisheries, analysis of various management approaches and tools, and future scenarios for world fisheries.

PR: Six credit hours in Geography at the 3000-level or permission of Head of Department.

2105 Canada's Natural Environments and Landscapes- Examines the characteristics and development of the natural environments and landscapes of each of the major regions of Canada. The diversity of natural environments is illustrated through discussion of the climatic, hydrological, biogeographical, and geomorphic processes responsible for shaping the land. The impact of both gradual and rapid (catastrophic) changes on local, national, and global scales will be emphasized.

2495 Regional Geography of Labrador- Is a holistic study of the Geography of Labrador, including the terrain, geology, Quaternary history, climate, vegetation, and fauna; the cultural geography of Labrador, including Innu, Inuit, Métis, and Settler people and communities; economic activities in Labrador, and the interaction of the Labrador economy within Newfoundland, Canada, and globally; the management of physical and human resources; and the geographic techniques used to investigate and understand Labrador's unique Geography.


Math


 

1050 Finite Mathematics I- Covers topics which include sets, logic, permutations, combinations and elementary probability.

PR: a combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or MATH 103F

1051 Finite Mathematics II- Covers topics which include elementary matrices, linear programming, elementary number theory, mathematical systems, and geometry.

PR: a combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or MATH 103F


Statistics


1510 Statistical Thinking and Concepts-Examines the basic statistical issues encountered in everyday life, such as data collection (both primary and secondary), ethical issues, planning and conducting statistically-designed experiments, understanding the measurement process, data summarization, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic concepts of probability, understanding sampling distributions, the central limit theorem based on simulations (without proof), linear regression, concepts of confidence intervals and testing of hypotheses. Statistical software will be used to demonstrate each technique.

CR: cannot receive credit for STAT 1510 if completed with, or subsequent to, STAT 2500, 2510 or 2550

PR: Mathematics 1090 or a combination of placement test and high school Mathematics scores acceptable to the Department.

2500 Statistics for Business and Arts Students-covers descriptive statistics (including histograms, stem-and-leaf plots and box plots), elementary probability, discrete random variables, the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, sampling distribution, estimation and hypothesis testing including both one and two sample tests, paired comparisons, chi-square test, correlation and regression. Related applications.

PR: Mathematics 1000 or 6 credit hours in first year courses in Mathematics or registration in at least semester three of a Bachelor of Nursing program or permission of the Head of Department.


Physics


1020 Introductory Physics I- is a non-calculus based introduction to mechanics. This course may be completed by someone who has no physics background provided some extra effort is made.

CO: Mathematics 1090

PR: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090. It is recommended that students have completed at least one of level II and level III high school physics courses

1050 General Physics I: Mechanics-is a calculus based introduction to mechanics. The course will emphasize problem solving. For more details regarding PHYS 1050

CO: Mathematics 1000

PR: Mathematics 1000


Psychology


1000 Introduction to Psychology- Is the first half of a two-semester introduction to Psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include history, research methodology, behavioural neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, and memory.

1001 Introduction to Psychology- Is the second half of a two-semester introduction to Psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include emotion, motivation, stress and health, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment, and social psychology.

PR: PSYC 1000

2010 The Psychology of Human Development I- Is a survey of principles underlying human development from the prenatal stage to adolescence. Topics covered will include sensorimotor, linguistic, perceptual, cognitive and motivational changes.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2011 The Psychology of Human Development II- Is an examination of relevant research on socialization and personality development with special emphasis on attachment, imitation, sex role and moral development in childhood and adolescence.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2012 Adult Development from Young Adulthood to Old Age- Examines physical and psychological changes from early adulthood until the end of the lifespan. Topics include career choices, love partnerships, parenting and grandparenting, cognitive changes, interpersonal changes, and healthy aging.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2150 Introduction to Forensic Psychology- will provide an in-depth overview of the relationship between psychology and the law. A variety of topics will be discussed and critically evaluated, including the use and misuse of psychology-based investigative methods such as offender and geographic profiling, detection of deception, investigative interviewing, eyewitness testimony, jury decision-making, corrections and treatment, risk assessment, and criminal responsibility.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2151 Health Psychology- will explore the history, aims and future of health psychology. Topics covered will consider the contributions of a wide range of psychological theory within the context of psychosocial risk factors for illness, illness prevention, health promotion, and the health care system itself. These theories extend from rather individualistic notions of health and wellness (e.g., personality, attitudes, and behaviour) to concepts associated with characteristics of the broader social environment (e.g., social support, economic challenges, and organizational factors). An overall bio-psycho-social approach to health and wellness is explored. PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001 UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2240 Survey of Learning- is a survey of learning phenomena and learning theories. Topics to be studied will include a selection of the following: the evolutionary context of learning, habituation and sensitization, Pavlovian conditioning, instrumental learning, and generalization and discrimination in learning. Applications of learning principles to topics such as child rearing, education, drug use and rehabilitation, as well as to other topics of contemporary interest, will also be discussed.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2440 Human Memory and Cognition- is an introduction to the basic principles of human memory and information processing. Topics covered will include the organization, representation and retrieval of information in memory, attention, pattern recognition, language processing, mental imagery, reasoning, problem solving, and decision making. There will be an emphasis on the application of basic principles to real life situations.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2540 Psychology of Gender- is an examination of the influence of gender on development and socialization, attitude formation, cognition, personality and mental health.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2610 Personality- is a review of the research and theory pertaining to a psychological understanding of human personality.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2800 Drugs and Behaviour- is an examination of the neurophysiology of drug action, the measurable effect of drugs on experimentally controlled behaviour, and a survey of information available on common self-administered drugs and their immediate and long-term effects.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2810 Brain and Behaviour- is a broad survey of physiological psychology at an elementary level. Topics will include the following: structure of the nervous system, nerve conduction, sensory and motor systems, behavioural biology of reproduction, aggression, feeding and drinking, sleep and arousal, pleasure and pain, learning and memory.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

2920 Research Methods in Psychology for Non-Majors- provides an introduction to the design, understanding, and application of psychological research. Topics covered include understanding and applying scientific method, creating and testing hypotheses, constructing reliable and valid experiments, and the proper use of controls. An emphasis will be placed on thinking critically about psychology and common errors of judgment.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major or any Psychology honours or joint honours programs

3430 The Psychology of Thinking- will present theories and experimental studies of problem solving, creativity and decision making. Topics covered will include the difficulties encountered in problem solving and solutions such as strategies for organizing and representing information, the production of ideas, transfer and discovery learning.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

3533 Sexual Behaviour-covers the most important aspects of human sexuality with a psychology theory and research framework. The course will examine the biological, behavioural and socio-cultural bases of the human sexual response. Topics include sexual interaction and communication, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, reproduction, sexual orientation, transgender and intersex, variations in sexual behaviour, sex and gender, sexual dysfunction and therapy, and sexual coercion.

PR: PSYC 1000 and 1001

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

3640 The Psychology of Abnormal Behaviour- covers problems of definition, the history of beliefs about abnormal behaviour and the implication of a behavioural model for the understanding and control of behaviour problems.

PR: any 2000 level course in Psychology

UL: cannot be used towards the Psychology major

 

 

Contact

Faculty of Science

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca