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Department of Ocean Sciences News

Memorial's Alumni Tribute Awards are the highest honour bestowed by the alumni body on Memorial graduates making tremendous contributions at home and around the world.

Four exceptional alumni are being honoured for their countless impacts on communities around the globe, individual accomplishments and dedication to their alma mater.

OSCS 3000

OCSC 3000 Aquaculture Principles and Practices emphasizes the techniques and methods used to culture finfish and shellfish, with a primary focus on Canadian aquaculture species. Basic aspects of aquaculture will be covered, including the design and maintenance of production systems, culture techniques, and the nutrition, health, physiology and reproduction of finfish and shellfish. The laboratory portion of this course will provide students with practical experience in the maintenance of land-based aquaculture production systems and in the husbandry/culture of aquatic organisms.

More Information contact Dr. Kurt Gamperl kgamperl@mun.ca or Danielle Nichols dnichols@mun.ca

Divers

In June a group of undergraduate and graduate students braved the three-degree waters of the Atlantic Ocean daily for two weeks as part of a new course.

An American marten (Martes americana) stands in snow. Researchers found that some native species, such as this one, benefit from invasive species, while others do not.

Image Credit: Tim Gage via Flickr

The term “non-native species” almost always has a negative connotation, but new research shows that in Newfoundland, some native wildlife might actually benefit from them.

In a recently published study in PLOS ONE, researchers in Newfoundland found evidence that non-native species including snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), introduced to the island in 1864, and the southern red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi), first detected on the island in 1998, have the potential for both negative and positive effects on Newfoundland’s terrestrial mammal food chain.

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