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Description of Courses Offered in First Year - Cont'd.

PHILOSOPHY

Philosophical problems arise in our concern for social issues, in the views we hold of the meaning and purpose of our lives, in the positions we take on political and moral questions, in the ideas we have of such things as freedom, conscience, god, the world, ourselves. They live below the surface of all our truly human actions. It is the task of philosophy to provide a means of becoming acquainted with these basic human issues, and to learn to reflect on them intelligently.

PHILOSOPHY 1200
Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to the main divisions, the terminology, and the fundamental questions of philosophy through the reading of classical texts. The course deals with philosophy as a contemporary intellectual discipline as well as a discipline with important past contributions.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

PHILOSOPHY 1600
Philosophy of Human Nature

An approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern, and the world views associated with them.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

1. Philosophy 1200 and 1600 may qualify as research/writing courses for the Faculty of Arts. Each semester students should verify that the course section being offered is a designated research/writing course.

2. Students may take either 1200 or 1600, or both, and in whichever order they prefer. Philosophy 1200 is the prerequisite for most further courses in philosophy.

3. Credit may not be obtained for both Philosophy 1600 and Philosophy 1001.




PHYSICS

Through physics we attempt to understand natural physical phenomena in the world around us, from the very small (atomic nuclei and elementary particles) to the very large (scale of the universe). The core of physics is a knowledge of basic laws laid down in fundamental theories such as those of kinematics, dynamics, relativity, electricity, magnetism, light, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics and nuclear and elementary particles. Physics is concerned with how these fundamental laws influence observed phenomena which might include anything from hitting a baseball with a bat to rocket dynamics.

There are two streams in first-year physics at Memorial. One uses calculus; the other algebra. The calculus based courses (Physics 1050/1051) are intended for students with more experience in physics. The algebra based courses (1020/1021) can be taken by students with a limited physics background.

Physics 1050 and 1051 are recommended for students planning studies in the physical sciences or engineering. Physics 1020 and 1021 are recommended for students planning studies in the life sciences. Students interested in physical sciences but who do not meet the prerequisites for Physics 1050 can take the course sequence Physics 1020, 1050, 1051. However, any student receiving a grade of 65 per cent or higher in Physics 1020 can proceed directly into Physics 1051.

Tutorial assistance is available to students in all introductory courses. The Physics Help Centre is open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday to Friday.

PHYSICS 1020
Introductory Physics I

A non-calculus based introduction to mechanics. Material in Physics 1020 will be similar to that of Physics 1050 but differs in the mathematical approach.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester with each session lasting a maximum of three hours.

Tutorials: Optional tutorials will be available, on average one hour per week
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090. Mathematics 1090 may be taken concurrently. It is recommended that students have completed at least one of Physics 2204 or Physics 3204 in high school; however, this course may be completed by someone who has no physics background provided some extra effort is made.

PHYSICS 1021
Introductory Physics II

A non-calculus based introduction to fluids, wave motion, light, optics, electricity and magnetism.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester with each session lasting a maximum of three hours.
Tutorials: Optional tutorials will be available, on average one hour per week
Prerequisite: Physics 1020 or 1050 and Mathematics 1000. Mathematics 1000 may be taken concurrently.

PHYSICS 1050
General Physics I: Mechanics


The principles of mechanics are studied following a calculus based approach.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester with each session lasting a maximum of three hours.
Tutorials: Optional tutorials will be available, on average one hour per week
Prerequisite: Completion of Physics 2204 and Physics 3204 in high school and enrolment in Mathematics 1000 concurrently

PHYSICS 1051
General Physics II: Oscillations, Waves, Electromagnetism

A calculus based introduction to oscillations, wave motion, physical optics, and electromagnetism.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester with each session lasting a maximum of three hours.
Prerequisite: Physics 1050 or 1020 (with a grade of 65 per cent) and Mathematics 1001. Mathematics 1001 may be taken concurrently.

Notes:

1. Students can receive credit for only one of Physics 1050 and 1020. 2. Students can receive credit for only one of Physics 1021 and 1051.

3. Students who have successfully completed Advanced Placement courses in both physics and mathematics at the high school level will normally be eligible for direct entry into Physics 1051 and 2053, both of which are offered in the fall semester.

For information go to www.physics.mun.ca/
or e-mail physhelp@physics.mun.ca.




POLITICAL SCIENCE

Political science is the systematic study of political ideas, events, people, processes and institutions. Its subject matter can range from the patterns of power relationships in basic human institutions to the study of international politics. Because nearly all human relationships are in a sense political, and because government and politics affect all aspects of our lives, an acquaintance with the subject matter of political science can help all individuals to become effective citizens. If you are interested in pursuing the subject in more depth, you may major or minor in political science.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1000
An Introduction to Politics

An introduction to the examination of politics, political ideas and political institutions. While individual sections of this course may vary in their approach, common themes include political ideologies, such as democracy and communism, and institutions, such as parliaments, elections and political behaviour. Canadian examples will be used in all sections and some will include the study of other countries.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1010
Canadian Political Problems

This course serves as an introduction to some of the more important political problems facing our country, such as poverty, foreign ownership of Canadian resources, regional disparities and the challenge of Quebec to national unity.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1020
World Political Problems

This course introduces students to the study of current problems in world politics, such as the arms race, management of the Earth's resources, human rights and the emergence of terrorists. Students will be encouraged to think about possible strategies for dealing with these issues.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Note: These courses may be taken in any order; none is a prerequisite for 2000-level courses. Only two of these courses may be counted towards the major or minor.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2200
Introduction to International Politics

This course introduces students to the basic conceptual tools needed to examine international relations in a rigorous and systematic way. The course focuses on the political and economic interactions across state borders conducted not only by governments but also by international and private organizations, firms, and individuals. By the end of the course students should be able to discuss current international issues using the appropriate concepts and theoretical tools. They should also be able to formulate some policy suggestions and be able to discuss both their theoretical sources and their impact.

Lectures: Three hours a week
Prerequisites: None

 







PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology is the science of behaviour and experience. It seeks to understand the behaviour of living organisms and, where appropriate, use that knowledge to promote human welfare. The Department of Psychology offers two courses at the introductory level; both are surveys of different subfields within psychology.

PSYCHOLOGY 1000/1001
Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to psychology as a biological and social science. Topics shall include research methodology, physiological processes, perception, learning, memory and cognition, human
development, animal behaviour, emotion, motivation, consciousness, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment, and social psychology.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Psychology 1000 is a prerequisite for Psychology 1001.

Note: Psychology 1000/1001 are prerequisites for all other psychology courses.

 




RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Wondering about the strange and exotic world of religion? Come with us and explore the beliefs of the world’s many faiths. Examine the reasons people feel the need to be religious and the impact of their beliefs on history, culture, society and politics. Why do people sacrifice, dress in unusual clothing, perform peculiar rituals? If you’ve ever asked yourself any of these questions, the Religious Studies Department should be on your list of courses and programs to consider.

Religious studies is the scientific exploration of religion. It neither upholds a particular set of religious beliefs, nor seeks to debunk any of them. Rather it strives to understand religion and religious claims. What do the various faiths mean by God? How do they interpret and express the relationship between humanity and the God they believe in, and how do these beliefs impact upon the lives of their followers and society at large? We explore the answers given by western religions like Christianity and Judaism, eastern religions like Buddhism and Confucianism and some of the world’s newer religious movements too.

One of the most asked questions about religious studies is, “What can I do with it?” Two obvious answers are the church and the school system. But there are many careers where knowledge of religion is valuable, especially those that deal with other peoples and other cultures - diplomatic services, international trade and commerce, health care, legal and social workers, and those in the media all benefit from knowing the religious sensitivities of other peoples and cultures.

Memorial University is one of the best places in Canada to study religion. With nine full-time professors, its Religious Studies Department is one of the largest in the country. Indeed, it’s the largest English-speaking program east of Montreal. Our facilities are superb as well. In addition to one of the nation’s largest libraries, we have the archives of The Religion in Newfoundland and Labrador Collection. Simply put, if you have any questions about anything religious, we have the resources to explore them.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1000
The Religions of the World

An introduction to the basic beliefs and practices of the world’s great religions.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Note: Credit may not be obtained for both Religious Studies 1000 and the former Religious Studies 2010.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1010
Religion in the Modern World

An introduction to some of the major issues confronting religion in the modern world. The focus will be on such topics as freedom and determinism, good and evil, love and sexuality.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1020
Christianity in Western Civilization

An introduction to Christianity and its place in the history of Western civilization through examples from early Christianity, the Reformation and the Modern Period.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1021
Apocalypse: The End Times in Thought, Action, and Imagination

This course will explore the many ways in which Judaism and Christianity have anticipated and imagined the end times. Attention will be given to Jewish and early Christian notions of the Messiah and his reign, the end of the world, and the impending judgment, as well as how Christianity has coped repeatedly with the delay of the end and how millennial thought and action have affected people during periods of social and natural crises. The role of millennial expectations in our modern era and why the apocalypse is once again a powerful image in religion, film, and literature will also be covered.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1022
Jesus in Film

A study of how Jesus is represented in modern film. The course explores the continuing impact that the Jesus of history and faith has had on modern western culture. The course will examine such films as The Greatest Story Ever Told, The Robe, The Gospel According to St. Matthew (by Pasolini), Jesus Christ Superstar, Jesus of Montreal, The Last Temptation of Christ, The Life of Brian, The Passion of the Christ, The Newfoundland Passion (video of the Squires’ Paintings).

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1032
Introduction to Asian Religions and Culture

This is a broadly based survey course introducing students to the religions, culture, and societies of Asia. Traditions explored may include those of India (Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism), China (Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism), Japan (Shinto, Zen Buddhism), and Korea.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1040
Introduction to Chinese (Mandarin) I

This course will introduce students to the basics of Chinese vocabulary, characters and grammar. Mandarin Chinese, the official dialect of China, Taiwan and Singapore, will be taught. This course is not intended for native speakers.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1041
Introduction to Chinese (Mandarin) II

A continuation of Religious Studies 1040. At the end of this course, students should know over a hundred Chinese characters, which should enable them to read basic texts and carry on a simple conversation. This course is not intended for native speakers.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Religious Studies 1040

Note: Religious Studies 1040 and 1041 may be used to satisfy the second language requirement of the bachelor of arts degree.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1050
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I

This course is designed to introduce students to the elements of Biblical Hebrew in order to prepare them for reading the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in the original. The emphasis will be upon learning the basic grammar and syntax of Biblical Hebrew.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1051
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II

A continuation of Religious Studies 1050. The emphasis will be upon the reading of selected Hebrew texts.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Religious Studies 1050

Note: Religious Studies 1050 and 1051 may be used to satisfy the second language requirement of the bachelor of arts degree.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1200
Introduction to the Bible

An introduction to the Bible in English translation, this course introduces the Bible’s role as a textual foundation in western religion and culture. The course explores the basic story line, characters, themes, and motifs found in the Bible, with an eye to their impact on western civilization.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None




RUSSIAN

Because of the recent reforms in Russia, the importance of Russian in the modern world is obvious. It is the official language of the largest country in the world, and one of the five official languages of the United Nations. It is spoken widely as a second language in eastern Europe. The difficulties of the language itself are exaggerated; contrary to the expectations of many, the alphabet is quite easy and can be mastered in a few weeks. The study of Russian provides a fascinating insight into a country that has long been enigmatic but is now the focus of world interest.

Russian is a useful tool for students of the arts, history and political science, and, because of the prominence of Russian technology and research, of business and all natural sciences.

RUSSIAN 1000/1001
Elementary Russian I/II

These courses, designed for the beginner, emphasize spoken as well as written Russian. At the end of these courses students should be able to hold simple conversations on everyday topics and to read and write basic Russian.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: One hour per week
Prerequisite: Russian 1000 is a prerequisite for Russian 1001.

Notes:

1. Russian 1000/1001 are prerequisites for all other Russian courses, except Russian 2030, 2031, 2600, 2601, 2900, 2901, 3004 as well as several others.

2. A number of courses may be of interest to incoming students. They require no prerequisites, the language of instruction is English throughout and they cover Russian culture and literature, for example, Russian 2600, 2601, 2900, 2901 and 3004. These five courses may not be used as part of the bachelor of arts requirement for two courses in a second language.

3. Russian 2600, 2601, 2900 and 2901 qualify as research/writing courses for the Faculty of Arts.






SCIENCE

To many people, a scientist is someone who spends time working on experiments in a laboratory. Although far from the whole truth, this picture is accurate in underlining the crucial role of the experiment in science. Experimentation leads to the discovery of individual, discrete pieces of information or facts, while the unification or bringing together of many separate but related facts is a generalization. It is this interplay between facts, generalization and experimentation that concerns us in science.

SCIENCE 1000
Introduction to Science

This course is a liberal science course for arts students. It brings scientists into the classroom to discuss the kind of research they do and how it relates to what science is all about and the social and other issues involved. The course is taught by six scientists and the detailed content will vary from semester to semester.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

1. This course cannot be used to satisfy the science requirement for entry into the bachelor of education (primary/elementary) degree.

2. This course may not be used to fulfill any of the science course requirements for the honours and general degrees in science.

SCIENCE 1150/1151
Introduction to Physical and Life Science

An introduction to some concepts in the physical and life sciences. These courses are primarily
intended for the non-science major (bachelor of arts; bachelor of education (primary/ elementary)).

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Note: Science 1150 is normally offered only in the fall semester. Science 1151 is normally offered only in the winter semester.






SOCIOLOGY

Sociology is a social science which is concerned with the description, understanding and explanation of the social behaviour of individuals and of the structures and processes of society.

SOCIOLOGY 2000
Principles of Sociology

This course is a general introduction to sociology. It emphasizes the basic sociological concepts as well as the nature of the sociological perspective, and looks selectively at certain features and
problems of the structures and processes of modern social life (such as the family, education, work, beliefs and values, social inequality and global development).

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Note: Sociology 2000 is a prerequisite for most sociology courses at the 3000 and 4000 levels.





SPANISH

Spanish is spoken by more than 300 million people in 20 countries in Europe and South, Central and North America. It is one of the fastest-growing Romance languages in Canada and a semi-official language in the United States.

SPANISH 1000
Elementary Spanish I

This course provides the beginning student with an intensive introduction to basic Spanish. Students will develop reading, writing and oral skills through immersion, participation in class and language laboratories.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: One compulsory laboratory class period per week and a personal laboratory hour
Prerequisite: None

SPANISH 1001
Elementary Spanish II

A continuation of Spanish 1000. This course expands, implements and reinforces the skills acquired in Spanish 1000. By the end of this course the student will have a strong basic knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary and a good degree of comprehension.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: One compulsory laboratory class period per week and a personal laboratory hour
Prerequisite: Spanish 1000

Note: Free optional conversation sessions are available, conducted by native Spanish-speaking monitors. Visits to the Multimedia Language Laboratory (SN-4022) are recommended.




THEATRE

Theatre-making requires training in a number of different areas of expertise, foremost among them being acting and stagecraft. Acting encompasses the imaginative and physical skills acquired by the contemporary actor through the study of voice, movement, textual interpretation and improvisation. Stagecraft requires a mastery of technical and creative skills such as set design, costume design, lighting, sound and stage management. In addition, students of theatre also need a broad knowledge of the history and theory of performance. Several first-year courses are available to non-theatre majors at Grenfell Campus.

THEATRE 1000 and 1001
Introduction to the History of Theatre I and II
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

A historical survey of the art of the theatre. The history of theatre will be studied in terms of the evolution of performance and of the physical theatre from their origins in a variety of social rituals and contexts through to their present plurality of forms. At the same time, the nature and function of the various components of theatrical performance (acting, directing, design, etc.) will be analysed in terms of period philosophical, social, cultural, political and religious contexts. These courses are open to non-theatre students.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None


THEATRE 1010
Introduction to Acting
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An appreciation of the fundamentals of the craft of acting. Basic exercises in voice, movement, relaxation and concentration, improvisation and script analysis will introduce the student to the imaginative and physical skills required by an actor. This is a basic course for all theatre students regardless of their specific areas of interest. This course is restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: None

THEATRE 1020
Introduction to Stagecraft
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An appreciation of the basic vocabulary and techniques of the various technical and organizational structures and practices of staging plays. Areas of concentration will include scenic and costume construction, basics in lighting, painting, props, sound and stage management. This is a basic course for all theatre students regardless of their specific areas of interest. This course is restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: None

THEATRE 1110
Acting I
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

The introductory course for those majoring in acting. Emphasis on voice, speech, movement and text analysis. Various learning methods will
be employed, from sensitivity exercises to improvisation and creative imagination exercises. Participation in in-class performance is required. This course is restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: Theatre 1000, 1010 and 1020
Corequisite: Theatre 1001

THEATRE 1120
Stagecraft I
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

The introductory course for those majoring in stagecraft. Emphasis on the fundamentals of scenic carpentry, wardrobe, sound, lighting, crewing, painting and stage management. Practical projects will be related to departmental productions. This course is restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: Theatre 1000, 1010 and 1020
Corequisite: Theatre 1001




TOURISM STUDIES


Tourism is a key sector in many economies. Tourism Studies will help provide the skills necessary for management planning and leadership roles in tourism. Some of the topics students will learn about include tourism marketing, public policy, management, eco-tourism and cultural issues. In addition, students will participate in practical work experience.

TOURISM 1000
Principles of Tourism
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

This course introduces students to the history of tourism and leisure, and the development of the field of tourism studies. This will include consideration of foundational concepts such as culture and nature, research on the needs and gratifications of tourists, and studies of the functions of tourism.

Note: Credit may not be obtained for Tourism 1000 and HKR 3565.

TOURISM 1100
Perspectives in Tourism
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

This course is an examination of tourism and the ideals, beliefs, institutions and experiences that contribute to culture. This course will emphasize the application of the humanities and social sciences to such areas as heritage, tradition and history. The student will gain an understanding of, and appreciation for, the importance of literacy, aesthetic, philosophical and religious traditions.

*Pending faculty appointment

UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE

UNIVERSITY 1010
The University Experience
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An introduction to the different modes of enquiry that one finds in the university, the interrelatedness of knowledge and the role of the university in society. This course also provides students with tools and techniques of study and research that can lead them to academic success and a fulfilling career.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

UCC 2020
Applied Cognitive and Affective Learning Strategies for
Undergraduate Students

An introduction to cognitive and affective learning strategies and techniques with an emphasis on the application of these techniques in the students’ own learning repertoires together with an overview of relevant research from cognitive psychology and related fields. Topics covered will include information processing, memory, forgetting, problem solving, metacognition, general and specific learning strategies, learning styles, and affective strategies.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None






VISUAL ARTS

VISUAL ARTS 100A/B
Drawing I
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

The fundamentals of drawing with study of line, tone, shape, volume, form, texture, space. Emphasis on drawing the human figure and studio problems. Attendance is required. These courses are restricted to visual arts students only.

Studio: Six hours per week
Co-requisite: Visual Arts 110A/B, 120A/B

VISUAL ARTS 110A/B
Two-Dimensional Design and Media (Available only at Grenfell Campus)

Principles of colour theory and colour mixing. Painting techniques in various media. Emphasis on rendering of form in space and organization of two-dimensional surface through studio problems. Attendance is required. These courses are restricted to visual arts students only.

Studio: Six hours per week
Co-requisite: Visual Arts 100A/B, 120A/B

VISUAL ARTS 120A/B
Three-Dimensional Design and Media (Available only at Grenfell Campus)

Three-dimensional form and spatial organization. Exploration of sculptural media through studio problems. Attendance is required. These courses are restricted to visual arts students only.

Studio: Six hours per week
Co-requisite: Visual Arts 100A/B, 110A/B

VISUAL ARTS 1000
Introduction to Two-Dimensional Media (Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An introduction to two-dimensional media (design, drawing and painting) that will provide students with both studio experience and an increased sensitivity to esthetic concerns. Students will investigate design principles through an exploration of visual fundamentals. The course will also cover basic drawing, including drawing from life and will introduce the study of colour through the use of a variety of media. These concepts will be explored through lecture and/or studio experience. Attendance is required.

Studio and Lecture: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

VISUAL ARTS 1001
Introduction to Process-Based Media (Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An introduction to process-based media that will provide students with both studio experience and an increased sensitivity to esthetic concerns. Students will be shown the fundamental concepts of a variety of process-based media with selections being made from the media of printmaking, sculpture and photo media (photography, digital imaging, performance, video). These concepts will be explored through lecture and/or studio experience. Attendance is required.

Studio and Lecture: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

1. Students are NOT expected to have previous drawing or art experience for Visual Arts 1000 or 1001.

2. Students presently enrolled in the Visual Arts program are restricted from taking either Visual Arts 1000 or Visual Arts 1001. These courses cannot be used for credit towards the BFA (Visual Arts) degree.




WOMEN’S STUDIES

Why should I take Women’s Studies?

Women’s Studies is both an academic and a personal journey. You are called upon to be agents of social change; to think critically about society and how to reduce inequities and remove barriers to full participation. You are beckoned to learn more about women’s history, women’s writing, women’s work, women’s health, women and the family, women and spirituality, women and education, women and sexuality, women and media, women and reproduction, masculinities and other forms of social difference.

What do students taking Women’s Studies courses do afterwards?

Some students go on to careers in non-profit organizations, business, the creative arts, education, government and public policy, journalism, law, medicine, publishing, science, the social sciences and social work. Some students continue on to do our Master’s of Women’s Studies. One of our graduates produced a documentary featured at the St. John’s International Women’s Film Festival.

WOMEN’S STUDIES 2000
An Interdisciplinary Introduction to Women’s Studies

An interdisciplinary introduction to the major concepts, issues and debates of women’s studies.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None




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