Psychology

 

What is psychology?

Psychology is the study of behaviour and its biological basis. It seeks to understand the behaviour of living organisms through scientific research and to use the accumulated knowledge to promote human welfare.

Psychology is both a science and a profession. As a science, psychology employs careful investigation to understand behaviour, thinking and experience. The profession of psychology applies this information to promote human welfare. Behavioural neuroscience is the general study of the relations between the structure and activity of the brain and its function in generating integrated adaptive behavioural responses.

 

Why study psychology?

The combination of writing, research and statistical analysis acquired in an undergraduate science degree with a major in psychology is a sound preparation for many careers, including but not limited to, administration, advertising, business, human resources, human services, law enforcement, real estate, research, sales, social services and technical writing. Psychology is also an excellent preparation for many graduate and professional programs, including law school, medical school and MBA programs.

 

Psychology at Memorial

The psychology co-operative program is available to fulltime psychology and behavioural neuroscience majors and honours students only. The program provides an opportunity for students to learn valuable practical skills while working in fields related to psychology. Students complete three work terms, which consist of full-time paid employment.

 

Courses available in first year

The Department of Psychology offers two courses at the introductory level; both are surveys of different subfields within psychology.

Psychology 1000
Introduction to Psychology is the first half of a two semester introduction to psychology as a biological and social science. Topics include history, research methodology, behavioural neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory.
Prerequisite: None
Lectures: Three hours per week

Psychology 1001
Introduction to Psychology is the second half of a two semester introduction to psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include emotion, motivation, stress and health, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment and social psychology.
Prerequisite: Psychology 1000
Lectures: Three hours per week

Note: Psychology 1000 and 1001 are prerequisites for all other psychology courses.

 

Sample program for first year

For students completing a Bachelor of Arts (BA) with a major in psychology

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
English 1090English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110
language study course (LS)language study course (LS)
Math 1050, 1051 or 1090Math 1050, 1051 or 1090
Psychology 1000Psychology 1001
elective course (breadth encouraged)elective course (breadth encouraged)

 

 


For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

For students completing a Bachelor of Science (BSc) with a major in psychology

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1090*Mathematics 1000*
Biology 1001Biology 1002
Chemistry 1010 (1050) or Physics 1020 (1050)**Chemistry 1011 (1051) or Physics 1021 (1051)
Psychology 1000Psychology 1001
English 1090English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110

 


* Students who complete Mathematics 1000 in the Fall semester may complete an elective in the Winter semester.

** Students registered in Physics 1050 must also be registered in Mathematics 1000 (not 1090).

Notes:

  1. Admission to the major program is competitive and selective. To be eligible for admission, you must have completed 24 credit hours with an average of at least 65 per cent in Psychology 1000/1001 and an overall average of at least 60 per cent in the following courses:
    • English 1090, and one of 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110
    • Mathematics 1000 (or 1090 and 1000) Students pursuing a B.Sc. must complete Mathematics 1000. Students completing a BA must complete either Mathematics 1000 or two of Mathematics 1090, 1050 or 1051
    • Psychology 1000, 1001
  2. Meeting these minimum criteria does not guarantee admission to the program.
  3. Students intending to major in psychology must submit an application form to the department by June 1 for Fall semester. Forms are available online:
    www.mun.ca/psychology/undergrad/forms.php
  4. Students should think carefully about whether to take Chemistry 1010 and 1011, Chemistry 1050 and 1051, Physics 1020 and 1021 or Physics 1050 and 1051. In particular, students should examine the prerequisites for other courses to see which courses best suit their interests and program of study. Picking one of these sequences may restrict your options later on.

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

For students completing a Bachelor of Science (BSc) with a major in behavioural neuroscience

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1000 (or 1090)*Mathematics 1001 (or 1000)*
any two of: Biology 1001, Chemistry 1010 (1050) or Physics 1020 (1050)**

see Notes 3-5

any two of: Biology 1002, Chemistry 1011 (1051) or Physics 1021 (1051)

see Notes 3-5

Psychology 1000Psychology 1001
English 1090English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110

 


* Students completing Mathematics 1090/1000 will be required to complete Mathematics 1001 as well.

** Students registered in Physics 1050 must also be registered in Mathematics 1000 (not 1090).

Notes:

  1. Admission to the program is competitive and selective. To be eligible for admission you must have completed 24 credit hours with an average of at least 65 per cent in Psychology 1000/1001 and an overall average of at least 60 per cent in the following courses:
    • English 1090, and one of 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110
    • Mathematics 1000 or Mathematics 1090 and 1000
    • Psychology 1000, 1001
      Meeting these minimum criteria does not guarantee admission to the program.
  2. Students intending to major in behavioural neuroscience must submit an application form to the Department of Psychology by June 1 for Fall semester. Forms are available online at:
    www.mun.ca/psychology/undergrad/forms.php
  3. Students interested in pursuing a B.Sc. in behavioural neuroscience should think very carefully about which courses they take in their first year. Those interested in a joint program or a minor program will need to be aware of the recommended second year courses.
  4. Selection of higher level courses is often dependent on completing the pre-requisites for these courses in first year. Students should plan their first year carefully to ensure that program requirements for behavioural neuroscience can be accomplished in a timely fashion. Students may wish to take chemistry and physics in Year 1 and biology in Year 2. Others may wish to take biology in Year 1 and either physics or chemistry in Year 2.
  5. Students are advised to consult with the Department of Psychology or the Academic Advising Centre about whether to take Chemistry 1010 and 1011, Chemistry 1050 and 1051, Physics 1020 and 1021 or Physics 1050 and 1051. Picking one of these sequences may restrict your options later on.

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Department of Psychology
psych@mun.ca


Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca