Human Kinetics and Recreation

 

Courses available in first year:

HKR 1000

Fitness and Wellness is an introduction to the concepts of fitness and wellness and the relationships among physical activity, fitness, wellness, quality of life and longevity.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course is not applicable toward any of the degrees offered by the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.

HKR 1001

Resistance Training for Health and Activity is an introduction to resistance training exercises, programs and principles.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite: None

Note: This courseis not applicable toward any of the kinesiology or physical education degrees offered by the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.

HKR 2000

Introduction to Physical Education, Recreation and Kinesiology introduces the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural, historical concepts and influences in kinesiology, physical education and recreation.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite: None

HKR 2300

Growth and Development is an introductory study of human growth and developmental factors and their influence on the learning of motor skills.

Lectures: Three hoursperweek

Prerequisite: None

HKR 2505

Recreation Programming and Evaluation introduces the student to a variety of methodologies, skills and materials for planning, developing, implementing and evaluating professional recreation programs for diverse populations inavariety of settings.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite: None

HKR 2515

Social Psychology of Leisure introduces the personality and social factors that shape how people experience leisure. Course materials will focus on life cycle theory, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, perceived freedom, constraints theory and other social psychological theory related to leisure.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite:None

HKR 2585

Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation is designed to examine a variety of aspects of therapeutic recreation from both a practical and theoretical prospective. Topics will include the history,philosophies and theories underlying therapeutic recreation, therapeutic recreation models, essential skills for therapeutic recreationists and ethical considerations for therapeutic recreation. Diverse groups (i.e.adults, youth, disadvantaged and disabled) and settings (i.e.community, schools, institutions and workplace) suitable for therapeutic recreation will be discussed.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite: None

Contact information

For additional information please contact:

John Saunders

jsaunder@mun.ca

www.mun.ca/hkr

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca