Geography

 

What is geography?

Geography is a unique discipline in that it integrates the physical and social sciences.

We focus on the changing interactions between people and their environments on local, national and global scales.

Geography is also a spatial discipline, so we are interested in the distribution of and relationship between, the physical and cultural entities in our world: climate, landforms, soils, populations, agriculture and cities. Key questions that interest us include: Are we using resources sustainably? What are the impacts of environmental change (e.g. climate) on societies in different places? How should we interpret and understand the spatial distribution of economic, political and social activity?

Geographers are more than map-makers (though they are that, too) – they are planners, researchers, educators and decision makers whose interests focus on some of society’s most pressing questions.

 

Why study geography?

There are many career options for geography graduates.

Environmental opportunities abound; locational analysis for commercial activity remains an important option; urban and regional planning continues to lure practitioners; and mapping and spatial data analyses have expanded with the wide-spread adoption of computer technologies. Teaching situations, at all levels, have been abundant as well. Geographers have long supplied their expertise to these areas, while recently adding new tools for executing these endeavours.

In addition to time-honoured applications, geographers are making inroads in less typical arenas. Travel and tourism now offer more opportunities to geographers, as do historic preservation, archival, and museum programs, along with situations involving international development and policy. From Geography: A Field of Dreams, Association of American Geographers.

For more information on geography or career options for students studying geography visit the following site:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=27p2k1oot80

Courses available in first year

Geography 1050
Geographies of Global Change provides perspectives on the major geographical challenges and changes facing the contemporary globe, including: climate and environmental change, sustainability, human development, economic globalization, cultural change, and population and migration. Using the integrative skills of geographical analysis, the course prepares students for advanced study in geography and citizenship in the modern world. 
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts  available at www.mun.ca/arts/qr

Geography 2001
Cultural Geography is an introduction to the study of culture in geography, emphasizing both the history of the field from classic studies of landscapes to contemporary scholarship and themes of recent importance. It explores the politics of cultural production and consumption: critical spaces of cultural production and consumption from around the world, including cities, landscapes, texts, media, performance and identity; and concepts of everyday life, materiality, and space/place. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050

Geography 2102
Physical Geography: The Global Perspective is a study of form, process and change in natural systems at and near the surface of Earth, viewed as human environment. Emphasis is on global and regional scales in the systematic study of climate, water, landforms and vegetation. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS and Quantative Reasoning course guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050

Geography 2105
Canada’s Natural Environments and Landscapes examines the characteristics and development of the natural environments and landscapes of each of the major regions of Canada. The diversity of natural environments is illustrated through discussion of the climatic, hydrological, biogeographical, and geomorphic processes responsible for shaping the land. The impact of both gradual and rapid (catastrophic) changes on local, national, and global scales will be emphasized.
Lectures: Three hours per week or by Distance
Prerequisite: none
Note: This course is not part of the Geography major requirements.

Geography 2195
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences is an introduction to the fields of cartography, remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS). Geographic information collection and representation and analysis methods are the topics for the course. An emphasis is given to applications of maps and satellite images. 
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines available at www.mun.ca/arts/qr

Geography 2302
Issues in Economic Geography covers basic issues and ideas in economic geography. The development of a regional economy will be related to underlying economic, cultural and physical factors.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050
Note: All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS and Quantative Reasoning course guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

Geography 2425
Natural Resources is an introduction to the concepts of natural resources, environment and conservation: the nature and distribution of natural resources; methods of use, allocation and development of natural resources and the role of various physical, social, economic, political and technological factors influencing decision-making about resources.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050
Note: Credit may not be obtained for both Geography 2425 and 3325.

Geography 2495
Regional Geography of Labrador is a holistic study of the Geography of Labrador, including the terrain, geology, Quaternary history, climate, vegetation, and fauna; the cultural geography of Labrador, including Innu, Inuit, NunatuKavut, and Settler people and communities; economic activities in Labrador, and the interaction of the Labrador economy within NL, Canada, and globally; the management of physical and human resources; and the geographic techniques used to investigate and understand Labrador's unique Geography.
Lectures: Three hours per week or by Distance
Prerequisite: none
Note: This course is not part of the Geography major requirements.

 

Sample program for first year

For students completing a Bachelor of Arts (BA) with a major in geography

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Geography 1050*Geography 2000 level
English 1090Geography 2000 level or  a second CRW course
Mathematics 1090**Mathematics 1000**
language study (LS) courselanguage study (LS) course
minor program courseminor program course

*Geography 1050 is a designated Quantitative Reasoning (QR) course for the Bachelor of Arts
** Or Mathematics 1000 and an elective; or Mathematics 1050 and 1051

Notes:

1. To be considered for admission to the Geography major program, students should complete 30 credit hours, including:

  • Geography 1050
  • at least six credit hours in 2000 level Geography courses
  • six credit hours in CRW courses (including English)
  • six credit hours in a combination of LS and QR courses

2. Students should contact the Department of Geography to discuss and declare their major program.

3. The completion of Mathematics 1000 as one of the mathematics courses will allow for greater choice in the selection of geography courses, particularly 3rd and 4th year physical geography, GIS, cartography, and remote sensing courses.

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

For students completing a Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) with a major in geography

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1090*Mathematics 1000*
Geography 1050Geography 2000 level
English 1090English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110
science electivescience elective
electiveelective

 


* Or Mathematics 1000 and an elective; or Mathematics 1050 and 1051

Notes:

1. To be considered for admission to the Geography major program, students should complete 30 credit hours, including:

  • Geography 1050
  • at least six credit hours in 2000 level Geography courses
  • six credit hours in English
  • at least three credit hours in Mathematics

2. Students should contact the Department of Geography to discuss and declare their major program.

3. The completion of Mathematics 1000 as one of the mathematics courses will allow for greater choice in the selection of geography courses, particularly 3rd and 4th year physical geography, GIS, cartography, and remote sensing courses.

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Department of Geography
geog@mun.ca

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca