Social Work

 

Why study social work?

The major focus of the School of Social Work is to educate students and prepare them for social work practice in a variety of settings. The types of settings include child and family services, health care, addictions and corrections. Areas in which students will be educated include:

  • assessment
  • interviewing
  • counselling
  • advocacy
  • program/policy analysis
  • case management
  • community capacity building

The program’s aim is to develop social workers with broadly based generalist skills for working with individuals, families, groups and communities. Students receive an education which prepares them to work in urban centres and rural settings. A special emphasis is placed on the importance of identifying local needs and developing the means of meeting these needs in the context of available resources.


The objectives of the undergraduate program are to prepare students to:

  • promote social justice and social well-being and creatively challenge oppression;
  • acquire and apply knowledge, skills, values, professional ethics and critical thinking abilities;
  • recognize limitations and strengths as a beginning social work practitioner;
  • integrate reflexively critical self-awareness;
  • assume leadership in collaboration and interdisciplinary practice;
  • utilize and participate in innovative and traditional inquiry and research models;
  • creatively practice with diverse individuals and collectives;
  • promote and critique the social work profession on regional, provincial, national and global levels;
  • commit to the process of lifelong learning;
  • participate collaboratively and respectfully in innovative teaching and learning processes; and
  • address issues of transition and crisis in diverse contexts (individuals, families, groups, communities, formal organizations and society).

The Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) qualifies the graduate for beginning professional practice in social work.


Admission Deadline

Candidates for a Bachelor of Social Work degree must apply by March 1 of the year in which admission is sought.

 

 

Bachelor of Social Work as a First Degree

Admission to the BSW as a first degree program’s 60 seats is competitive and takes place annually with a start date in the Fall semester.

A candidate for the Bachelor of Social Work as a First Degree must complete 75 professional education credit hours from the School of Social Work and 45 general education credit hours from Complementary Studies. Included in the 75 credit hours of the required professional education courses are two field practica (formerly known as internships): one field practicum in the third year (12 credit hours) and one in the fourth year (12 credit hours). Students are expected to be available for field practica throughout the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Field practicas are designed to provide students with a broad experience of social work in diverse practice settings.


Admission Requirements:

Applicants must have:

  • achieved an average of at least 65 per cent in the courses comprising the last 30 credit hours attempted by the end of the Winter semester for the year in which admission is being sought and for which a numeric grade has been assigned;
  • completed 30 credit hours of required prerequisite courses outlined in the sample program below and must have achieved a minimum grade of 65 per cent in each of these required prerequisite courses.
  • completed a minimum of 60 hours of verified work/volunteer/community involvement experience.

 

 

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Social Work will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
 Learning Objective One Learning Objective One
 Learning Objective Two Learning Objective Five
 Learning Objective Three Learning Objective Six
Learning Objective FourLearning Objective Two - Six
 Social Work 1710Learning Objective Two - Six

 







The 30 credit hours of required prerequisite courses are:

  • three credit hours for Social Work 1710
  • 21 credit hours from the Complementary Studies courses selected for each learning objective listed in Table 1: Complementary Studies. The required credit hours are as follows:
    • Learning Objective One: six credit hours
    • Learning Objective Two: three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Three: three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Four: three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Five: three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Six: three credit hours
  • six credit hours of courses chosen from the approved courses listed for the Complementary Studies Learning Objectives Two to Six.

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

Table 1: Learning Objectives

Below is a list of courses that are available in first year. The full list of Complimentary Studies courses can be found in the 2017 - 2018 University Calendar (available in June)

 The Six Learning Objectives for
Complementary Studies Courses
Approved Disciplines and Course Numbers
Learning Objective OneStudents will develop university knowledge and skills in critical reading, writing, and analysis.

Note: Students are encouraged to select courses from two separate subject areas.
Critical Reading and Writing Courses (CRW), St. John’s campus, or Designated Writing courses (W), Grenfell Campus, chosen from the following disciplines:
  • Archaeology
  • English
  • Folklore
  • Gender Studies
  • History
  • Humanities*
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Religious Studies
Learning Objective TwoStudents will develop foundational knowledge and appreciation for the various expressions and experiences of human and cultural diversity.Anthropology 2413
English 2122, 2705*, 3810*
Gender Studies 1000, 2000*, 2006
Humanities 2002*
Psychology 1000, 1001, 2020, 2025*, 2030, 2125*, 2540, 2625*
Sociology 2100
Learning Objective ThreeStudents will develop foundational knowledge and understanding of historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous peoples of Canada.Anthropology 2414
Archaeology 1005 or History 1005
English 2160
History 2800
Learning Objective FourStudents will develop foundational knowledge and awareness of the historical and contemporary realties of social inequities, imperialism, and racism.Archaeology 1005 or Histroy 1005
Gender Studies 1000, 2000*, 2006
Geography 1050, 2001
History 2140, 2800
Sociology 2100
Learning Objective FiveStudents will develop foundational knowledge in governance and policy-making.Humanities 1002*, 2002*
Political Science 1010, 2600, 2800
Police Studies 2000
Learning Objective SixStudents will develop a critically reflective understanding of contemporary society (locally, nationally, and globally) and their place in it.Philosophy 1600*, 2220, 2400, 2541, 2551, 2552, 2553
Law and Society 1000, 2000
Social/Cultural Studies 2000*
Sociology 1000, 2100, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2230, 2240, 2250, 2270

*These courses offered only at Grenfell Campus

 

Bachelor of Social Work as a Second Degree

Admission to the BSW as a second degree program’s 16 seats is competitive and takes place annually with a start date in the Winter semester.

The Bachelor of Social Work as a Second Degree (BSW) is a 60 credit hour program intended for candidates who have completed the required courses, met the academic performance requirements, and have extensive verified work/volunteer/community involvement experience.

The program is delivered over four consecutive, full-time semesters and commences in the Winter semester. This includes a combination of course work and two field practica (formerly knowns as internships). Students are expected to be available to complete these practica anywhere in the province.


Admission Requirements:

Applicants must have:

  • been awarded a Bachelor’s degree, or been approved (by the end of the Winter semester preceding the academic year in which admission is being sought), for the award of a bachelor’s degree from a university recognized by Memorial;
  • achieved an average of at least 70 per cent in the last 60 credit hours of undergraduate study attempted by the end of the Winter semester preceding the academic year in which admission is being sought and for which a numeric grade has been assigned;
  • completed the 30 credit hours of required prerequisite courses outlined below by the end of the winter semester preceding the academic year in which admission is being sought and must have achieved a minimum grade of 70 per cent in each of these required prerequisite courses. These courses and credits must have been taken at Memorial or accepted for transfer credit from a recognized university or university college.
  • completed a minimum of 300 hours of verified work/volunteer/community involvement experience.


The 30 credit hours of required prerequisite courses are:

  • three credit hours for Social Work 1710
  • 21 credit hours from the Complementary Studies courses selected for each learning objective listed in Table 1: Complementary Studies. The required credit hours are as follows:
    • Learning Objective One: six credit hours
    • Learning Objective Two:three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Three: three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Four: three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Five: three credit hours
    • Learning Objective Six: three credit hours
  • six credit hours of courses chosen from the approved courses listed for the Complementary Studies Learning Objectives Two to Six.

Table One: Learning Objectives

 The Six Learning Objectives for
Complementary Studies Courses
Approved Disciplines and Course Numbers
Learning Objective OneStudents will develop university knowledge and skills in critical reading, writing, and analysis.

Note: Students are encouraged to select courses from two separate subject areas.
Critical Reading and Writing Courses (CRW), St. John’s campus, or Designated Writing courses (W), Grenfell Campus, chosen from the following disciplines:
  • Archaeology
  • English
  • Folklore
  • Gender Studies
  • History
  • Humanities*
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Religious Studies
Learning Objective TwoStudents will develop foundational knowledge and appreciation for the various expressions and experiences of human and cultural diversity.Anthropology 2413, 3060, 3061, 3063, 3210*
English 2122, 2705*, 3810*
Gender Studies 1000, 2000*, 2006, 3005, 3025, 3100
Humanities 2002*, 3001*, 4001*
Psychology 1000, 1001, 2020, 2025*, 2030, 2125*, 2540, 2625*
Sociology 2100, 3314*, 3731*, 4071*, 4072*, 4201, 4213
Learning Objective ThreeStudents will develop foundational knowledge and understanding of historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous peoples of Canada.Anthropology 2414, 3070
Archaeology 1005 or History 1005
English 2160
History 2800, 3520, 3525
Humanities 3100*
Political Science 3830
Law and Society 3012, 3014
Religious Studies 3880*
Learning Objective FourStudents will develop foundational knowledge and awareness of the historical and contemporary realties of social inequities, imperialism, and racism.Anthropology 3061, 3063, 4415, 4416
Archaeology 1005 or History 1005
Gender Studies 1000, 2000*, 2006, 3005, 3025, 3100
Geography 1050, 2001
History 2140, 2800, 3520, 3525, 3760*, 3770*, 3813, 3821, 4253, 4421
Sociology 2100, 3180, 3314*, 3420
Learning Objective FiveStudents will develop foundational knowledge in governance and policy-making.Humanities 1002*, 2002*
Political Science 1010, 2600, 2800, 3550*, 3610, 3620, 3650, 3731*, 3800, 3880, 3890
Police Studies 2000
Learning Objective SixStudents will develop a critically reflective understanding of contemporary society (locally, nationally, and globally) and their place in it.English 3810*
Humanities 4001*
History 2665, 3120, 3760*, 3770*, 3813, 3821, 4253
Philosophy 1600*, 2220, 2400, 2541, 2551, 2552, 2553
Law and Society 1000, 2000, 3012, 3014, 3300
Social/Cultural Studies 2000*
Sociology 1000, 2100, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2230, 2240, 2250, 2270, 3140, 3210, 3290, 3318, 3400, 3420

 

*These courses offered only at Grenfell Campus

Note: The full list of courses will be available in the 2017-2018 University Calendar 

Please note that the criteria used for selection is subject to change annually. Applicants will normally be notified of admissions decisions by the end of June.

 

Course available in first year

Social Work 1710
Social Work Philosophy and Practice provides an overview of the historical development, philosophical orientation, basic values, principles and knowledge base and fields of practice of the profession. The course will examine critical social problems that impact societies with an emphasis on the quest for social justice at local, national and global levels.  
Lectures: This course is offered online in the Fall and Winter semesters.
Prerequisite: None
Note: This is a prerequisite for ALL social work courses and is required for admission.

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
bswinquiries@mun.ca
www.mun.ca/socwrk/home/

 

 

 

 

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca