Science

 

What is science?

Science has been described as a way of knowing, of finding out about ourselves and our world.

 

Why study science?

The Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree exposes students to the tools and techniques scientists use to discover, analyze, interpret and make predictions about subjects as small as sub-atomic particles and as large as the universe.
Graduates of our science programs can move on to such diverse areas as teaching, industry, private consulting, science journalism, the civil service, environmental law, research and development or other exciting careers that might not even exist yet, requiring adaptable thinking in our complex and technical world.

 

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree

Students can indicate their intention to study a B.Sc. program when completing the General Application for Admission to Memorial University. The B.Sc. degree (general or honours) requires the completion of 120 credit hours chosen to satisfy the general regulations for the degree. In the Faculty of Science, it is necessary to declare a major program and it is optional to declare a minor program. Science students are strongly encouraged to choose the subject of their major program after finishing their first year of study. During their first year of university, students should contact the department of their proposed major for academic advice on program choices and course scheduling.

 


 

Science 1807: Safety in the Scientific Laboratory

introduces students to safety practices required for working in science laboratories where hazards are present. Students complete individual online modules in laboratory safety and WHMIS and must obtain a mark of at least 80 per cent in both modules in order to pass the course. Normally, it will be taken before the start of the semester in which students take their first science laboratory course with this prerequisite, and it must be completed no later than the last day to add courses in the semester. Check department lists of courses to see where this is a prerequisite.

This course is offered online; completion time estimated to be two hours.

Students should first register for all their courses including Science 1807 through Memorial Self-Service. After registering it will take up to six hours to gain access to the course. Students access the course online through Desire2Learn using their my.mun.ca login ID. Any questions can be directed to labsafety@mun.ca.

Major programs are offered in:

Minor programs are offered in:

  • all of the science major programs
  • sustainable aquaculture & fisheries ecology
  • arts
  • business
  • music
  • applied science – process engineering for chemistry majors

Note: The Faculty of Science offers introductory science courses that can be taken for credit towards any degree that requires one or more general science electives, are not part of a specific major, and can be taken by non-science majors.

Course descriptions for Science 1000, Science 1150 and Science 1151 can be found here

.

Science 1000
Introduction to Science I is a liberal science course which reflects the way various scientists think and work. The course is usually taught by five science professors covering areas as diverse as marine ecology, physics, and computer science. The intent of the course is to bring practicing researchers and scientists into the classroom where they can discuss their research and also consider historical, philosophical and social connections between their work and the environment we live in.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Notes:

  1. This course cannot be used to satisfy the science requirement for entry into the Bachelor of Education (Primary/Elementary) degree.
  2. This course may not be used to fulfil any of the science course requirements for the honours and general degrees in science.
  3. This course brings scientists into the classroom to discuss the kind of research they do and how it relates to what science is all about and the social and other issues involved. The course is taught by five scientists and the detailed content will vary from semester to semester.

Science 1150
Introduction to Physical and Life Sciences is an introduction to the fundamental concepts in the physical and life sciences, in particular biology, Earth Sciences and astronomy. These courses can be taken for credit towards any degree that requires one or more general science electives and can also be taken by non-science majors.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Science 1807
Note: Science 1150 is not acceptable as a prerequisite for 2000-level courses in biology, astronomy or Earth sciences.

Science 1151
Introduction to Physical and Life Sciences is an introduction to the fundamental concepts in the physical and life sciences, in particular physics and chemistry. These courses can be taken for credit towards any degree that requires one or more general science electives and can also be taken by non-science majors.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Science 1807
Note: Science 1150 is not a prerequisite for Science 1151; these two courses can be taken in any order. Science 1151 is not acceptable as a prerequisite for 2000-level courses in physics or chemistry.

Contact information:
Dr. Oscar Meruvia-Pastor Assistant Professor, Faculty of Science oscar@mun.ca
www.mun.ca/science

Honours degree

The Bachelor of Science Honours (B.Sc. (Hons.)) is also available in the major subject areas. Students should contact the undergraduate officer in their intended department for course and program advice if they are considering an honours degree.

 

Joint programs

A student may elect to do a joint major program or a joint honours program. Many current options are described in the University Calendar, but other combinations are also possible. Students interested in a joint program should contact the department(s) involved for advice before they declare a major.

 

Admission requirements

Most major programs within the Faculty of Science do not have any additional admission requirements beyond those for admission to the university. Major programs in the departments of Biochemistry, Biology and Psychology are competitive for a limited number of placements. Students seeking admission to departments with competitive admission must apply on the appropriate departmental application for admission form after completing the specified admission requirements.

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
science@mun.ca

 

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca