Physics

 

Why study physics at Grenfell?

Physics is a study of how the universe works. It’s the study of the tiniest particle – the structure of an atom’s nucleus, to the vast universe. You can learn about astrophysics and cosmology through one of Atlantic Canada’s largest astronomical telescopes right here at the Grenfell Campus Observatory. Or you can explore the fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics or particle physics. You can shape your program so you study exactly what most intrigues you. Your physics degree can be completed in four years.

Core courses include:

  • The solar system
  • Electromagnetic theory
  • Thermodynamics
  • Computational mechanics
  • Elementary particles and fields
  • Galaxies and cosmology
  • Mathematical physics
  • Observational astrophysics

 

Career opportunities

Graduates of the physics program have a high employment rate and there are a number of different career opportunities, including:

  • Research and development
  • Teaching
  • Laser and optics
  • Water and oceanography
  • Space science
  • Nuclear science

Courses available in first year

Physics 1020
Introductory Physics I is a non-calculus based introduction to mechanics.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090. Mathematics 1090 may be taken concurrently. It is recommended that students have completed at least one of Level II and Level III high school physics courses, however, this course may be completed by someone who has no physics background with some extra effort.

Physics 1021
Introductory Physics II is a non-calculus based introduction to fluids, wave motion, light, optics, electricity and magnetism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Physics 1020 or 1050 and Mathematics 1090 or Math 1000, either of which may be taken concurrently

Physics 1050
General Physics I: Mechanics is a calculus- based introduction to mechanics. The course will emphasize problem solving.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructors’ discretion.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000, which may be taken concurrently

Physics 1051
General Physics II: Oscillations, Waves, Electromagnetism is a calculus-based introduction to oscillations, wave motion, physical optics and electromagnetism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Physics 1020 (with a minimum grade of 65 per cent), 1021 or 1050 and Mathematics 1001. Mathematics 1001 may be taken concurrently

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a B.Sc. with a major in physics will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1000Mathematics 1001
English 1000English 1001
Physics 1050Physics 1051
Chemistry 1200*Chemistry 1001*
elective**elective**

 


*Although Chemistry is not required for the B.Sc. in physics, it is recommended; a student who wishes to include chemistry but who defers it to a later year may have difficulty in scheduling.

 

**The electives may be chosen from almost any discipline. It is recommended that a student interested in upper-year course work in astronomy or in subatomic physics select either Physics 2151 or Physics 2400, respectively, as one of these electives.

 

Note: A student who has completed Physics 2204 and Physics 3204 in high school and who is eligible for Math 1000 should register for Physics 1050, not Physics 1020. Choosing Physics 1020 with this background will result in an extra year being required to complete the degree. A student wishing to pursue the B.Sc. with a major in physics without this background in mathematics and physics may do so by taking the sequences Physics 1020, 1021, 1051 and Mathematics 1090, 1000, and 1001.

 

 

Contact Information

Dr. Pierre Rouleau
prouleau@grenfell.mun.ca
www.grenfell.mun.ca/academics-and-research/Pages/Bachelor-of-Science/Physics.aspx

 

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca