Faculty of Science News

Dr. Julissa Roncal

An assistant professor in the Department of Biology is hoping to give new life to an old collection.

Dr. Julissa Roncal has been given responsibility for Memorial’s herbarium, the largest in the province.

Dr. John Jamieson

Dr. John Jamieson could be the next Canadian to go into space.

This week, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) announced the assistant professor of earth sciences and Canada Research Chair in Marine Geology has made the short list of a year-long campaign to find its two newest “star” candidates.

 

Dr. Craig Purchase

Spawning season is a busy time in Dr. Craig Purchase’s world.

But despite a near around-the-clock schedule ferrying salmon gametes from the lab to the river, the evolutionary ecologist sat down with the Gazette recently to share some insight into another one of his roles: volunteer for a national organization dedicated to the scientifically sound classification of wildlife species at risk.

 

Spiralling burrow

New Memorial University research has identified how the first burrowing animals helped engineer the explosion of life as we know it.

 

Dr. Douglas Wallace

The Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Ocean Science and Technology will deliver the 2017 Elizabeth R. Laird Lecture at Memorial University on Jan. 31.

Dr. Douglas Wallace's public lecture, titled Vital Signs: Watching the Deep Ocean Breathe in the Labrador Sea, is hosted by the Faculty of Science and the Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography.

 

Dr. Julie Gosselin

A new book co-written by a faculty member in the Department of Psychology may provide a useful guide for mental health professionals.

In late December, associate professor Dr. Julie Gosselin, director of clinical training for the doctor of psychology (PsyD) program at Memorial, released A Systematic and Integrative Model for Mental Health Assessment and Treatment Planning. It’s the first in a collection that will be released over the coming year.

 

Martin Day

Psychologists at Princeton University and Memorial University have found that how Americans view social mobility affects their willingness to defend the basic underpinnings of American society — such as social and economic policies, laws and institutions.

Christa Sandall

Christa Sandall may hail from landlocked Alberta, but salt water seems to run through her veins.

Since graduating from Memorial with a bachelor of science in marine biology last June, she has been living and working in the island country of the Philippines.

 

Dr. Melanie Greene, teaching consultant

This fall marked the launch of a new program for Memorial’s faculty that provides an introduction to important aspects of graduate student supervision.

Developed by the School of Graduate Studies (SGS) and the Centre for Innovation in Teaching and Learning (CITL), the Program in Graduate Student Supervision is the first training program of its kind at Memorial, and also unique among Canadian universities.

 

Dr. Patricia Canning

The Department of Psychology will remember a late faculty member with a new annual lecture series in her name.

Dr. Patricia Canning passed away in November 2015.

The Dr. Patricia Canning Memorial Lecture in Child Health and Development was established through generous gifts and pledges from her family and friends. The first lecture in the series will take place in March 2017.

 

Postcard

Thanks to a recent office change in the Chemistry-Physics building, a stack of the vintage postcard booklets came to light. Scenes of student life and campus features are pictured on the front of each; Memorial’s ceremonial crest and directions for postage and the address are found on the back, plus the former names of some buildings and spaces.

 

Dr. Michael Katz

Creating a cleaner, greener future and designing a unique hands-free musical instrument.

Both are cutting-edge projects being led by two researchers who are this year’s Terra Nova Young Innovator Award recipients. The award recognizes and supports outstanding young faculty members whose research is particularly innovative and whose specific proposal has real potential to make a significant impact on society.

Book cover

A new book, co-edited by Memorial biology PhD candidate Laura Siegwart Collier, adds a valuable and unique insight to the academic literature on climate change.

In The Caribou Taste Different Now: Inuit Elders Observe Climate Change, Inuit elders and knowledge holders from eight Canadian Arctic communities — Kugluktuk, Baker Lake, Pangnirtung, and Pond Inlet in Nunavut; Umiujaq, Kangiqsujuaq, and Kangiqsualujjuaq in Nunavik; and Nain in Nunatsiavut — share their observations of climate change, including how it is affecting traditional ways of life.

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