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Building Sustainable Partnerships

Some partnerships are built to last. In this presentation, Dr. Stephen Bornstein from the Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research and Kelli O'Brien from Long Term Care and Rural Health, Western Health, speak about including public collaborators/stakeholders on your planning team, and how to increase the likelihood of the uptake of results.

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More information on this topic:

From the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). A short guide on understanding audiences for the planning of engagement activities and for working with specific groups of people.

From the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). NCCPE's top ten suggestions for getting started in public engagement work.

From the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). A short guide on identifying and developing your skills in public engagement in relation to your engagement goals.

From the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). This discussion of "co- inquiry" ("cooperation in research between a range of participants from different backgrounds") provides a walkthrough on how to implement the core components of this methodological approach.

From the Work Group for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas. Though health-focused, this toolkit provides generalizable information on topics such as "Assessing Community Needs and Resources," "Developing a Strategic Plan," and "Analyzing Community Problems and Solutions."

From the National Community-Based Research (CBR) Wiki. This wiki page provides several resources on "Engaging and Supporting Community Partners," including entries from CBR projects from various universities.

From the International Town and Gown Association. This six-week online certificate program provides modules “addressing the social, cultural, physical, and economic situations unique to communities that are also home to college and university campuses.”

From the Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) community at the University of Washington. This website provides a "free, evidence-based online curriculum [for] community- institutional partnerships that are using or planning to use a CBPR approach to improving health."

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