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REF NO.: 71

SUBJECT: Memorial University arts student latest Rhodes Scholar from this province
DATE: Nov. 28, 2007

An energetic Memorial University arts student, born in a war-torn country on the other side of the world, is the newest Rhodes Scholar for Newfoundland and Labrador.
Remzi Cej [pronounced: SAY], 24, is originally from Kosovo. He’s currently completing a joint honours degree in French and German Studies at Memorial’s St. John’s campus.
He immigrated to this province with his family in 2000 to escape the violence and destruction that plagued his country.
As this province’s 100th nominee for the Rhodes Scholar, Mr. Cej plans to complete a bachelor of arts degree at the prestigious Oxford University, focusing on international humanitarian law.
This latest honour builds on several other local and national awards Mr. Cej has received.
“It’s such an honour and privilege to be selected a Rhodes Scholar-elect and to be able to represent my community and province in one of the most prestigious universities in the world,” said an elated Mr. Cej. “To be a Rhodes Scholar, for me, is to have a chance to study something I’ve dreamt of doing since my teenage years.”
Mr. Cej is a well-known community volunteer and activist and has achieved a 3.8 grade point average while studying at Memorial.
He is actively involved with a wide-range of groups including the Association for New Canadians, Amnesty International, the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Community Youth Network.
He is the youngest recipient of the YM/YWCA Peace Medal, presented for his commitment to educating the general public about human rights. His list of accomplishments also includes a Terry Fox Humanitarian Award.
Mr. Cej said he is eager to start his studies overseas.
“The Rhodes Scholarship is an exclusive award. It is one of the most prestigious I know of,” he said. “Oxford’s law studies program is one of the best in the world. Oxford was one of the leading institutions to host and play an important role at an international meeting in 1880 that saw the creation of the first draft of what came to be known as the Geneva Conventions 60 years later, a set of international laws guiding warring states or factions in distinguishing between civilians and soldiers.
“To be able to study in a place so central to my goals of working within the international humanitarian law is not only a privilege, but an incredible opportunity to explore history further in order to concentrate on what we can do in the future generations to come.”
Mr. Cej grew up in the shadow of the Kosovo war and saw its effects first-hand. He said those experiences are the impetus for his desire to study humanitarian law.
“My parents and I came here as refugees late in 2000, hoping for an alternative to the violence we had experienced during the war in 1998 and 1999,” he said. “And peace we found – along with 21-feet of snow, in our first winter in St. John’s.”
Mr. Cej is set to graduate from Memorial during the spring 2008 convocation ceremonies in St. John’s.
He’ll take up his studies at Oxford next fall.
“My goal is to work in international policy work, in drafting laws and guiding principles for states to respect civilians in vulnerable situations,” he noted. “My law degree will have a special emphasis on vulnerable populations, that is, seniors, women and children in conflict situations. I hope to be able to take my Oxford training and education to a higher level, be it through the United Nations or the International Committee of the Red Cross, the world leader in international humanitarian law.”

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