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REF NO.: 180

SUBJECT: Expert to present on factors inhibiting academic advancement for women
DATE: June 3, 2003

Note to editors:

Dr. Janet Bickel, former vice-president of the American Association of Medical Colleges and a pre-eminent investigator of gender issues in medicine, will be giving three seminars in the Main Auditorium of Memorial University's Faculty of Medicine on June 9 and 10. Dr. Bickel has studied faculty advancement and described the many factors inhibiting academic advancement of female faculty.

Details of the seminars are as follows:

June 9, 12-1 p.m., Main Auditorium, Faculty of Medicine (open to all faculty, students and staff)

    Taking charge of your career
    Goal-Setting and Advancing Seminar participants will: become better prepared to manage their own careers; acquire insight and motivation to set goals for own professional development and achievement; acquire new understandings of the extra challenges women face in career building and how they can rise to them; develop strategies for finding and managing mentoring and expanding professional networks.

June 10, 12-1 p.m., Main Auditorium, Faculty of Medicine

    Working through personality differences at work
    This workshop, based on insights from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, will improve participants' ability to: recognize and appreciate the value of differences between their own and colleagues' work styles; communicate with bosses, co-workers and partners more effectively; understand why conflicts arise within a team and discover non-judgmental ways to address them.

June 10, 5:30-7 p.m., Main Auditorium, Faculty of Medicine

    How women can get their ideas across in a half-changed world
    While increasing in numbers, women professionals nonetheless encounter a "half-changed world" in terms of their ability to realize their full potential. The "old boy's system" still influences who is promoted; women continue to manage most home responsibilities on top of work; and the environment remains generally hostile to women's ambitions. Women are thus less likely to get credit for their ideas and are more likely than men to "flame out," "burn out," or simply disappear without achieving their goals. This session will: use a case to explore these phenomena; offer tips on getting your ideas across despite these extra challenges and in the face of hostility and non-professionalism.

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