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Coasts Under Stress, March 1, 2006

Coasts Under Stress was a unique experiment in genuinely interdisciplinary research. It used a set of carefully-constructed complementary case studies on the East and West Coasts of Canada to achieve an integrated analysis of the long- and short-term impacts of socio-environmental restructuring on the health of people, their communities and the environment. Seventy natural and social scientists and 167 trainees worked together with local communities on the two coasts. The work, built around the unifying thread of environmental and human health, produced a broader multi-layered perspective on the management of natural resources than previously existed, by combining formal scientific (natural and social) and humanist analysis with the lived experience of coastal people.

Coasts Under Stress was a five-year project that started in April 2000. It was funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada , with additional funding from participating universities and partners in government, business, non-governmental organizations and First Nation groups. Additional information about Coasts Under Stress can be found here.

The goal was to offer policy makers an informed awareness of the implications, both positive and negative, of social and environmental restructuring, so that they are able to shape future policy more effectively. In this regard, a workshop was held under the auspices of the Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development on March 1st, 2006, on the campus of Memorial University. The workshop featured some of the researchers from Coasts Under Stress as well as officials from the federal and provincial governments.

Download the list of participants and the agenda.

The workshop featured presentations from the following researchers:

Dr. Rosemary Ommer and Dr. Barbara Neis

Dr. Joe Wroblewski

Dr. Rick Williams

Dr. Shirley Solberg

Dr. Stephen Tomblin and Kelly Vodden

Download the report on the workshop and the evaluation summary.

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