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Spring 2014 Course Offerings

1000 Level Courses

English 102F-Foundation English is a non-credit course designed for students whose language is other than English and whose knowledge and use of English do not meet the standards for entry into regular first-year English courses.

English 1020-Writing for Second Language Students I is an introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for non-native English speaking students.

English 1021-Writing for Second Language students II develops skills in critical reading and writing of academic English, with emphasis on research and writing syntheses from sources, for non-native English-speaking students.

English 9992-Foundation English for Graduate students

English 1080-Critical Reading and Writing I offers an introduction to such literary forms as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the essay. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

English 1101-Critical Reading and Writing II (Fiction) is a study of such forms as the novel, the novella, and the short story sequence. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

English 1110- Critical Reading and Writing II (Context, Substance, Style) is an examination of prose texts such as essays, articles and reviews. Students write for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

2000 Level Courses

English 2000 - Major Writers to 1800 is an introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of ENGL 2000, 2005, and 2110.

English 2001 - Major Writers from 1800 is an introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.

English 2004- Short Fiction is a study of short fiction which aims to give the student an appreciation of the short story as a literary form. The course will deal with the nature, history and development of short fiction by considering a variety of authors and stories.

English 2151 - New Canadian Fiction is a study of fiction of Canadian writers since the 1970s.

English 2211 - The English Novel from 1800-1900 a study of representative English novels of the nineteenth century, including works by such authors as Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, Thackeray, Gaskell, Eliot, Trollope and Hardy.

3000 Level Courses

English 3201- Shakespeare is a study of six comedies and histories such as Love’ s Labour’s Lost, The Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Henry V.

English 3260-American Drama is a study of works by dramatists such as O'Neill, Rice, Maxwell Anderson, Sherwood, Williams, Hellman, Odets, Saroyan, Inge, Miller, Albee, Wilder and Kopit.


4000 Level Courses

English 4070-
British Literature 1890-1920 a study of representative writers such as Hardy, Wilde, Conrad, Housman, Forster, Edward Thomas, Owen, D.H. Lawrence, Mansfield, Virginia Woolf.

English 4261- American Literature from 1928-1945 concentrates on the study of American fiction, drama and poetry in the period between the two World Wars. The course includes such writers as Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, O'Neill, Stevens, Cummings and Hart Crane.

English 4999-001 - Essay for Honours Candidates. This course is not available on the electronic registration system. Registration for this course requires the signature of the essay advisor and the Manager of Academic Programs or the Head.

English 5000-Instructional Field Placement is a 6 credit hour course which occurs upon completion of course work. The curriculum emphasis is on the application of acquired skills. Continuing the project-oriented structure built into the practical courses, students will be placed with existing projects in the professional communities of film, television, theatre or video.

Prerequisites: English 3350, 3351, 3816, 4400, 4401 and 4402, with an overall average of at least 65% in these courses.

Note: Restricted to students in Diploma in Performance and Communications Media. Admission is by application to the Program Coordinator, normally at least three months before the beginning of the placement, and is limited to students who at the time of admission have completed the six courses listed above with an overall average of at least 65% and who already hold a first degree or are in their final year of a degree program as confirmed by the Office of the Registrar. Credit for this course can be used only towards the Diploma in Performance and Communications Media.





 

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