Office of the Registrar
Grenfell Campus (2019/2020)
13.12 Environment and Sustainability

Environment and Sustainability courses are designated by ENSU.

  • The following number scheme is used to identify courses:
  • 1st digit = year
  • 2nd digit indicates specialization
  • 0 = common
  • 1 = Resource Management
  • 2 = Environmental Studies
  • 9 = Independent Research Project

1000

Introduction to Sustainability

examines historical and contemporary models of resource management and decision making as well as the supporting theoretical basis for an interdisciplinary approach to natural resources that includes ecological, economic, social and political perspectives. Case studies will be presented from Newfoundland and Labrador, across Canada, and around the world.

CR: the former Environmental Studies 1000, the former Sustainable Resource Management 2000

2000

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

explores the structure, design, science, and applications of digital geospatial information and geospatial technologies. These include Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Remote Sensing (i.e. 3S technology), and the Geoweb such as Google Earth, Location Based Services (LBS). Students will also gain exposure to hands-on exercise and analysis on the current GIS software.

CR: the former Environmental Studies 2000, Geography 2195

LH: 3

PR: Environmental Science 1000 or Earth Sciences 1002 or Geography 1050

2001

Introduction to Systems Thinking

exposes students to complex system dynamics that challenge our understanding of environmental and resource management. It is designed to help students develop a systems’ intuition for analyzing environmental and resource management problems and provide the skills needed to better understand complex interactions within and among natural and human systems. It covers the introduction of basic structure and behavior of systems and key interrelationships in social-ecological systems.

CR: the former Sustainable Resource Management 2001

PR: ENSU 1000

2200

Outdoor Pursuits - Fall

introduces the theoretical rationale and practical skills needed to demonstrate basic proficiency in several of the following activities: minimal-impact camping, wilderness cooking, hiking, kayaking, canoeing, navigating with map and compass, outdoor safety, search and rescue, and group management. The major focus of this course will be the practical application of learned skills.

AR: attendance is required

CR: the former Environmental Studies 2210

OR: 3 hours of practicum per week

2201

Outdoor Pursuits - Winter

introduces the theoretical rationale and practical skills needed to demonstrate basic proficiency in several of the following activities: navigating with map and compass, outdoor safety, search and rescue, group management, cross-country skiing, telemark skiing, downhill skiing, snowshoeing, winter camping, and winter survival techniques. The major focus of this course will be the practical application of learned skills.

AR: attendance is required

CR: the former Environmental Studies 2220

OR: 3 hours of practicum per week

3000

Human Dimensions of Resource Management

explores how human attitudes and beliefs can be incorporated into resource and environmental management decisions and strategies. While this course will focus on the human aspects of resource and environmental management, it will also highlight the importance of integrating ecological dimensions into management efforts.

CR: Geography 3425

PR: ENSU 2001

3001

Application of Geographic Information Systems

exposes students to the application of GIS in environmental and resource management through the use of real world, locally-relevant case studies. The topics cover spatial data acquisition, spatial data creation, spatial data interpolation, and simulation of the distribution of flow of mass, energy, goods, services, animals and people in a spatially-explicit manner. In addition to laboratory assignments, students will complete a major term project.

CR: the former Environmental Studies 3001, Geography 3260

LH: 3

PR: ENSU 2000

3100

Environmental Planning and Management

has two simultaneous and complementary dimensions: planning and management. The “environment” in environmental planning and management plays out in two ways: inappropriate consumption, and appropriate site accommodation. In this course, we consider the broad context of environmental problems while focusing the planning toolkit on principles of sustainability. The course starts with a history of environmental contexts in North America, and then moves to the specifics of context. Case studies are widely employed.

CR: the former Sustainable Resource Management 3001

PR: ENSU 2001

3101

Analytical Approaches to Resource Management

provides training in application of modelling approaches for entities ranging from single populations to interacting systems. These approaches will be used to understand population and ecosystem dynamics as well as harvester and market behaviour under various management scenarios.

LH: 3

PR: Biology 2600, ENSU 2001, Geography 3222 or 3 credit hours in statistics

4000

Integrated Approaches to Resource Management and Decision Analysis

exposes students to approaches from natural and social sciences for natural resource management and decision making. Natural resource management involves decision making in a complex array of biophysical, social and economic environments consisting of the allocation of resources, formulation of policies, and manipulations of natural systems. The course presents methodological and practical aspects of planning and management using a case-based approach with regional, national and international perspectives.

PR: ENSU 3000 or permission of the Program Chair

4010

Seminar in Environment and Sustainability

is a senior seminar in which selected environmental issues will be examined from several disciplinary perspectives.

CR: the former Environmental Studies 4010, the former Sustainable Resource Management 4010

PR: ENSU 3000 or permission of the Program Chair

4100

Remote Sensing

discusses the physical principles on which remote sensing is based and the types of measurements being made. Understanding how remote sensors work at the conceptual level is the key to understanding the type of information that can be obtained. The topics covered include collection, manipulation and processing of remotely-sensed data, and the applications of these data in environmental and resource management.

CR: Geography 3250, the former Sustainable Resource Management 4000

LH: 3

PR: ENSU 3001

4200

Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies

provides a detailed, comprehensive investigation of selected environmental problems that could include the following issues: risk assessment, indigenous peoples’ perspectives on the environment, energy policy, water governance, parks planning & management, political ecology, natural resource policy and administration, and environmental justice.

PR: ENSU 3000

4201

Environmental Assessment

provides a thorough consideration of the environmental effects of a project and takes into account potential and probable impacts on the environment as well as people. Other areas of emphasis include cumulative impacts, socio-economic impacts, sustainability assessments, and Strategic Environmental Assessments of policies, plans, and programs.

CR: the former Environmental Studies 4000

PR: successful completion of 60 credit hours

4901-4910

Special Topics in Environment and Sustainability

will have topics to be announced.

PR: enrollment in third or fourth year of the Bachelor of Environment and Sustainability Degree program

4950

Independent Research Project - Environmental Studies

is a course that requires students to conduct independent research in environmental studies under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will prepare a major paper based upon their independent research.

CR: the former Environmental Studies 4950

PR: ENSU 3000, Geography 3222, Sociology 3040

4960

Independent Research Project - Resource Management

is a course that requires students to conduct independent research in resource management under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will prepare a major paper based upon their independent research.

CR: the former Sustainable Resource Management 4950

PR: ENSU 3000, ENSU 3101, Geography 3222

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).