Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (2020/2021)
11.6 Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering

Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering courses are identified by a four-digit numbering system, the first two digits signifying the following:

The first digit denotes the academic term during which the course is normally offered.

  • The second digit denotes the primary areas of study, namely:
  • 0: Regular courses
  • 9: Special Topics courses

Non-departmental Engineering courses are designated by ENGI.

Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering courses are designated by ONAE.

3001

Ocean/Naval Design

(same as the former ENGI 3001) introduces design and operation for ships and marine structures. Technology evolution in ship and offshore structures is reviewed, emphasizing service needs. Structural concepts, materials and construction methods are examined, including design for manufacturing. The design spiral and trade-offs between design characteristics are explored and modelling methods as tools in the design process are introduced. There is a minimum of six laboratory sessions including ship tours, a design project or research paper.

CR: the former ENGI 3001

LH: at least six 3-hour sessions per semester

3054

Ocean Engineering Hydrostatics

(same as the former ENGI 3054) is an introductory course to naval architecture and marine engineering. It discusses the basic principles of the statics of rigid floating or submerged structures. These include: ships, offshore platforms and submersibles. Methods of analysis of the hydrostatics, stability and trim, damage stability and the statics of mooring systems are introduced. Applications are also discussed.

CR: the former ENGI 3054

LH: at least nine 3-hour sessions per semester

PR: ENGI 1010

4007

Marine Materials

(same as the former ENGI 4007) examines the properties and uses of steel, aluminum and composite materials in marine applications. Topics include: review of mechanics of materials, Hooke’s Law, material failure models; carbon steel - fundamentals, processes, preparation, design, drawings, certification; joining of aluminum; riveting and welding; corrosion phenomena; composites - classification, production, and mechanical properties.

CR: the former ENGI 4007, the former ENGI 7007

LH: at least 4 three-hour sessions per semester

PR: Chemistry 1050

4011

Resistance and Propulsion

(same as the former ENGI 4011) examines ship resistance and some factors considered in the design of marine screw propellers. Topics include the resistance due to friction, wave making, form appendage, wind and waves, squat, blockage, shallow water effects, and the estimation of powering using methodical series and statistical methods. Topics considered in the design of marine screw propellers include propeller theory, blade sections, blade strength, methodical series charts, efficiency elements, lifting line calculations, cavitation, and propellers in non-uniform flow.

CR: the former ENGI 4011, the former ENGI 5011

LH: 3

OR: tutorial 1 hour per week

PR: ONAE 3054 or the former ENGI 3054

4020

Marine Fluid Dynamics

(same as the former ENGI 4020) includes fluid statics; fluid flow phenomena, in general and in marine applications; control volume analysis of fluid motion; conservation of mass, momentum and energy; differential approach to flow analysis; head losses; applications of conservation laws; external vs. internal flow; dimensional analysis and scaling; fluid-structure interaction concepts; potential flow theory, lift and Kutta-Joukowski theorem; viscous flow, boundary layers and drag.

CR: the former ENGI 4020

LH: at least four 3-hour sessions per semester

OR: tutorial 1 hour per week

PR: ONAE 3054 or the former ENGI 3054

5020

Marine Propulsion

(same as the former ENGI 5020) is a second course in marine propellers and ship powering. Design and analysis of marine screw propellers and other propulsion devices are covered. Conventional and unconventional propulsion systems are introduced. Methods and philosophy of propeller design are included. Design of fixed-pitch propellers based on lifting line theory and the design of ducted propellers are emphasized. Design of other propulsion systems such as waterjets and sails is also incorporated.

CR: the former ENGI 5020, the former ENGI 6020

LH: at least two 3-hour sessions per semester

PR: ONAE 4020 or the former ENGI 4020

5022

Probability and Random Processes in Ocean Engineering

(same as the former ENGI 5022) includes basic concepts in probability, random variables, multiple random variables, descriptive statistics. The random processes component reviews mathematics of functions; introduces system input-output relations of continuous-time systems; contrasts time vs frequency domain representations; introduces frequency response plots and the Fourier transform. A probabilistic approach to ship damage, representation of ocean waves (in time and frequency domains), Response Amplitude Operators (RAO), and acceptable levels of risk for design are introduced and applied.

CR: the former ENGI 5022

OR: tutorial one hour per week

PR: ONAE 4020 or the former ENGI 4020, Mathematics 2260 or the former Mathematics 3260

5034

Marine Vibrations

(same as the former ENGI 5034) provides an introduction to mechanical vibration with a focus on vibration of marine machinery and on the dynamic response of marine structures. Topics include: single degree of freedom systems – free vibration, energy methods, response to harmonic excitation, response to arbitrary inputs; multi degree of freedom systems – natural frequencies and mode shapes, response to harmonic excitation; frequency response functions; on-board sources of vibration, vibration measurement techniques and instrumentation.

CR: the former ENGI 5034, the former ENGI 5932, the former ENGI 6933, Mechanical Engineering 6303

LH: at least four 2-hour sessions per semester

PR: Mechanical Engineering 3301 or the former ENGI 3934

6002

Ship Structures I

(same as the former ENGI 6002) examines longitudinal strength, still water and wave bending moment, shear and bending moment curves, Smith Correction, section modulus calculation, torsion and racking forces; bulkhead and girder scantlings, portal frame analysis by moment distribution and energy method; finite element analysis and the use of Classification Society rules for design of midship section. Laboratory sessions cover use of analysis software to illustrate structural behaviour concepts.

CR: the former ENGI 5003, the former ENGI 6002

LH: at least five 3-hour sessions per semester

PR: Civil Engineering 4310 or the former ENGI 4312

6005

Floating Ocean Structures Design

(same as the former ENGI 6005) introduces floating structures used in the offshore petroleum industry, along with functional requirements, such as drilling and production, of the platforms. Field development criteria are discussed in the context of platform concept selection and synthesis. Environmental loads are examined, focussing on wave loads and ice loads. Diffraction theory and its application on offshore structures is presented. Offshore safety is discussed in terms of major hazards, risk management, and case studies.

CR: the former ENGI 6005, the former ENGI 7005

LH: 1

PR: ONAE 3054 or the former ENGI 3054

6036

Dynamics of Ocean Vehicles

(same as the former ENGI 6036) examines applications of the linearized equations of motion to ocean vehicle problems with single and multiple degrees of freedom in waves; dynamics of marine vehicles: motions in waves; hydrodynamics effects such as added mass, radiation and viscous damping; strip theory; irregular seaway and motions.

CR: the former ENGI 6030, the former ENGI 6036, the former ENGI 7035

LH: at least two 3-hour sessions per semester

OR: 1 tutorial hour per week

PR: ONAE 3054 or the former ENGI 3054, ONAE 4020 or the former ENGI 4020

6046

Marine Engineering Systems

(same as the former ENGI 6046, the former ENGI 7045) examines shafting system design; shafting system vibration analysis, study of exciting forces and moments, and balancing of reciprocating and rotating machinery; heat transfer and marine heat exchangers; incompressible fluid flow and piping system design and selection of appropriate pumping devices.

CH: 4

CR: the former ENGI 6046, the former ENGI 7045

LC: 4

LH: 1

PR: Mechanical Engineering 3401 or the former ENGI 3901, ONAE 5034 or the former ENGI 5034

6055

Marine Cybernetics

(same as the former ENGI 6055) examines propulsion and motion control of ships, submersibles and offshore structures. Building upon the student’s knowledge of mathematics, mechanics and hydrodynamics provides an introduction to control systems and mathematical modeling of marine systems. Course components include: basic control actions and response of control systems; simulation and design of control systems; dynamic positioning; power management; marine automation.

CR: the former ENGI 6055

LH: at least four 2-hour sessions per semester

PR: ONAE 4011 or the former ENGI 4011

7000

Ocean Systems Design

(same as the former ENGI 7000) develops concept design methods for marine systems from need definition through to solution selection, including weight, cost and power requirements estimating, selection of principal design characteristics and evaluation of alternative solutions. Students develop a proposal for a marine system design project which will include a statement of requirements, a parametric study, a work plan and schedule. This design project will be completed as a full design in ONAE 8000.

CR: the former ENGI 7000, the former ENGI 7052

LH: 3

PR: ONAE 3001 or the former ENGI 3001, ONAE 3054 or the former ENGI 3054, ENGI 4102

7002

Ship Structures II

(same as the former ENGI 7002) is an introduction to ship structural safety and rational design. Topics include local strength analysis, elastic, plastic and ultimate strength of plating, frames and grillages, buckling of columns and plates and fatigue and fracture in ships. Laboratory exercises include structural analysis software and physical experiments.

CR: the former ENGI 6003, the former ENGI 7002

LH: at least five 3-hour sessions per semester

PR: ONAE 6002 or the former ENGI 6002

7003

Small Craft Design

(same as the former ENGI 7003, the former ENGI 8003) presents fundamentals of naval architecture and design methodology for small craft. Emphasis is on recreational craft, with special emphasis on sailing vessels. Construction materials, scantlings, performance prediction and seaworthiness are covered. Design problems unique to small craft such as mast design, sail area determination and performance prediction are covered. Students will do a small craft design of their choice. Small weekly design studies will be required.

CR: the former ENGI 7003, the former ENGI 8003

PR: ONAE 6036 or the former ENGI 6036 or the former ENGI 7035

7033

Marine Hydrodynamics

(same as the former ENGI 7033) examines the fundamental equations of hydrodynamics, boundary layers; potential flow, added mass, damping, circulation, and vorticity; numerical methods for hydrodynamic coefficients; water waves and loading for regular and irregular seas.

CR: the former ENGI 7033

LH: at least one 3-hour session per semester

OR: one tutorial hour per week

PR: ONAE 4020 or the former ENGI 4020

7036

Manoeuvring of Ocean Vehicles

(same as the former ENGI 7036) examines manoeuvrability of ocean vehicles; derivation of linear and nonlinear equations of motion and hydrodynamic coefficients; stability of motion; standard maneuvers such as turning circle, turning spiral, and PMM test; modelling and simulations of engine, propulsion, rudder and transmission systems during manoeuvring; systems for course keeping, autopilot, motion control and dynamic positioning.

CR: the former ENGI 6030, the former ENGI 7035, the former ENGI 7036

LH: at least two 3-hour sessions per semester

OR: 1 tutorial hour per week

PR: ONAE 6036 or the former ENGI 6036

7046

Marine Economics and Ship Construction

(same as the former ENGI 7046) examines the macro-economics of the marine transportation industry and identifies and examines the stages of project definition. The basic techniques of project management needed for large scale industrial marine projects, such as ship construction and transportation of natural resources, are introduced. This course examines methods for estimating labour hours, materials, fabrication facilities required and schedule for ship construction. The legal and social aspects of large projects are also examined.

CR: the former ENGI 7046

PR: ENGI 4102

8000

Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering Project

(same as the former ENGI 8000) completes the design project selected and approved in ONAE 7000 The project must illustrate the application and integration of previous design related courses, i.e., decision methods, impact assessments and application of technology. The subject may be ship or offshore structure design, marine system, directed research or a unique design solution. Lectures will be scheduled as required.

CR: the former ENGI 8000

LH: 3

PR: ONAE 7000 or the former ENGI 7000

8034

Applied Acoustics

(same as the former ENGI 8034) provides an introduction to acoustic engineering. Topics include: sound in fluids and solids, wave phenomena, mathematical models of sound waves, sources of sound, frequency analysis, levels and decibels, introduction to psychoacoustics, sound waves in rooms, reverberation time, sound absorbers, sound insulation, room acoustical design, introduction to underwater acoustics, acoustic measurement techniques and instrumentation.

CR: the former ENGI 8034

LH: at least four 3-hour sessions per semester

PR: ONAE 5034 or the former ENGI 5034

8046

Marine Engineering II

(same as the former ENGI 8046) builds on the fundamental marine engineering aspects covered in ONAE 6046 to include engineering factors onboard the ship, such as electrical generation, lighting, heating and air conditioning, as well as special systems needed on board the ship for operation, cargo management and navigation.

CR: the former ENGI 8046

PR: ONAE 6046 or the former ENGI 6046

8054

Advanced Marine Vehicles

(same as the former ENGI 8054) examines the concepts used in the design of advanced marine vehicles. Emphasis will be given to: structural design of craft constructed from fibre reinforced plastics; high speed marine vehicles (powering, structures, seakeeping and model testing); small craft.

CR: the former ENGI 8054

LH: at least 9 hours per semester

PR: ONAE 6002 or the former ENGI 5003 or the former ENGI 6002

8055

Design and Control of Unmanned Marine Vehicles

(same as the former ENGI 8055) examines the formulation of mission statement and design constraints of unmanned marine vehicles, surface and underwater. Major subsystems, including propulsion, power, communication, navigation and control, are introduced. Principles of navigation and control as they pertain to unmanned systems are examined. This course includes hands on experimentation including the design of a small unmanned platform for tank experiments.

CR: the former ENGI 8055

LH: at least 12 hours per semester

PR: ONAE 3054 or the former ENGI 3054

8074

Arctic Ocean Engineering

(same as the former ENGI 8074, the former ENGI 8674) examines marine ice load on ships and marine structures designed for ice covered waters. Topics include types of naturally occurring ice; sea ice formation and characteristics; mechanical strength of sea ice under common modes of ice failure; modes of ice interaction with ships and marine structures; estimation of ice forces on offshore structures; powering requirements for ice breaking ships; regulations and standards for design of ships and offshore structures in arctic environments.

CR: the former ENGI 8074, the former ENGI 8674

LH: at least four 3-hour sessions per semester

PR: Civil Engineering 4310 or the former ENGI 4312, Mechanical Engineering 3301 or the former ENGI 3934

8075

Finite Element Analysis of Marine Structures

(same as the former ENGI 8075) examines application of the finite element method (FEM) to the design and assessment of marine hull structures. Simulation of static, quasi-static, and impact loads on hull structures is discussed. Linear and nonlinear analyses are explored. Practical considerations for finite element model design are discussed.

CR: the former ENGI 8075

LH: 12 weekly 3-hour lab sessions

PR: ONAE 4007 or the former ENGI 4007, ONAE 7002 or the former ENGI 7002

8900-8999

Special Topics in Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).