Diploma in Northern Peoples, Lands, and Resources

The Diploma in Northern Peoples, Lands and Resources is administered by the School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies (SASS) at the Labrador Campus, in partnership with the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

The Diploma aims to provide a foundation in the understanding of issues relevant to the North, including Labrador, the provincial and territorial Norths in Canada, and the Circumpolar North.

Illustration of ice breaking up

What to expect...

...during the diploma:

Given SASS’s unique location, focus, and capacity, students obtaining a Diploma in Northern Peoples, Lands, and Resources can expect to learn about Northern and Indigenous societies, economies, and landscapes in the contexts of diversity and change. Students take courses in multiple disciplines and develop a broad base of knowledge and skills relevant to Northern studies, careers, leadership, and community- and place-based relationships.

...after completing the diploma:

This Diploma aims to expand the range of currently available programs that specifically address the preparation of students for Northern careers. Graduates will be well-prepared for a wide range of employment opportunities, including within government and the public sector; with Northern community and Indigenous organizations; and in administrative, policy, and community relations positions within industries that operate in the North.

The Diploma will also prepare students with existing careers in any sector to assume responsible leadership roles in Northern contexts and operations.

Requirements and courses

Students pursuing the Diploma in Northern Peoples, Lands, and Resources are required to complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in eligible courses*, as follows:

3 credit hours in foundational studies in a relevant field, selected from the following list of approved foundational courses:

(Note: All courses are 3 credit hours, unless otherwise indicated)
  • Anthropology 1031 - Introduction to Anthropology 
  • Archaeology 1000 - Introduction to Archaeology
  • Geography 1050 - Geographies of Global Change

21 credit hours in courses on relevant themes, including at least 12 credit hours at the 3000-level or higher, selected from the following list of approved courses**:

(Note: All courses are 3 credit hours, unless otherwise indicated).
2000-LEVEL:
  • Archaeology 2482 - Indigenous Peoples and the Struggle for Self-determination 
  • Geography 2105 - Canada's Natural Environments and Landscapes
  • Geography 2302 - Issues in Economic Geography
  • Geography 2425 - Natural Resources
  • Geography 2495 - Regional Geography of Labrador
  • History 2800 - Indigenous Peoples and Colonialism
  • Linguistics 2060 - Indigenous Languages of Eastern Canada
  • Philosophy 2130 - Environmental Ethics
3000- AND 4000-LEVEL:
  • Anthropology 3280 - The Arctic
  • Archaeology 3290 - First Peoples of Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Archaeology 3588 - Arctic Archaeology
  • Economics 3080 - Natural Resources and Environmental Economics
  • English 3009 - Literature and the Environment
  • Geography 3405 - Canada 
  • Geography 3425 - Geographical Analysis of Resources 
  • Geography 3610 - Cultural Landscape 
  • Geography 4050 - Engaging Arctic and Northern Geographies
  • Geography 4410 - Research Seminar in Resources
  • Law and Society 3012 - Indigenous Peoples: Concepts of Land, the Law and the Constitution
  • Law and Society 3014 - Indigenous-Crown Relations in Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Archaeology 4015 / Geography 4015 / Folklore 4015 - Cultural Resource Management
  • History 4220 - Indigenous Peoples and the Environment
  • History 4252 - Canada and the North

*Students must not take more than 18 credit hours in courses from any one department.

**The School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies is a new school in 2020, and expects to develop additional courses in the future. These courses will be added to future editions of this list, once they are offered.

6 credit hours in summer schools, field schools, or other land- and/or place-based courses.

Eligible summer schools, field schools, and land- and place-based courses must take place in Labrador, the provincial and territorial Norths in Canada, or the Circumpolar North, and which have been approved by the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies (or delegate).

Students must contact the Diploma Coordinator to ensure the entirety of the courses are relevant to the program, and must apply to the Undergraduate Committee of the School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies (or delegate) to have the 6 credit hours applied to the Diploma in Northern Peoples, Lands, and Resources.


Admission information

Students intending to complete a diploma program within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences must meet the Admission requirements as outlined in the University Calendar.

Students are also advised to consult the University Calendar regarding General Regulations for Diploma Programs and Graduation Requirements, and to be aware of the regulation limiting the use of certain credit hours to fulfill multiple programs within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

A tentative list of upcoming course offerings in the program can be found at www.mun.ca/hss/courses.php


Program guidance

Throughout their program of study, students shall contact an academic advisor or the Coordinator of the Diploma in Northern Peoples, Lands, and Resources for assistance with course planning, declaring their program of study, prerequisite and registration issues, and with questions about the eligibility of any courses not listed here.

Diploma coordinator contact information: TBA