MacEdward Leach and the Songs of Atlantic Canada
The Keyhole in the Door
Raymond Noseworthy NFLD 1 Tape 13A Track 1
Pouch Cove Audio:
Parlour song

I left the parlour early I suppose it was scarce nine
By damn good luck or fortune her room was next to mine
My mind being like Columbia 's it was turning o'er and o'er
I took a slight proceeding through the keyhole in the door

She first took off her collar which fell upon the floor
I saw her stoop to get it through the keyhole in the door
A dark and a dim blue garter all around her leg she wore
She was one handsome picture through the keyhole in the door

She then proceeded further to take off her outward clothes
With many sorts of linen there were fifteen I suppose
With many sorts of linen I'll bet there was a score
In fact I could not count them through the keyhole in the door

Then up before the looking glass this pretty girl she stood
A-viewing of her beauty it brought fever in my blood
My hair it stood like brushes all on some angry boar
Good God I felt like jumping through the keyhole in the door

. before the fire her little feet to warm
With nothing but a nightshirt to conceal her little form
I said pull up that nightshirt and I'll ask you nothing more
You bet I saw her do it through the keyhole in the door

And then upon the pillows she laid her little head
The light being grown dimmer it brought shadows o'er her bed
The light … I knew the show was over, and I knew there's nothing more
I then took my departure from the keyhole in the door

Came all young men of science who oftimes strain your eyes
The viewing of those planets all in the starry skies
A-viewing of those planets you may view them o'er and o'er
But the telescope is nothing to the keyhole in the door


Notes

Sources: Roud 2099

History: Attributed to Eugene Field, late 19 th century (http://www.csufresno.edu/folklore/BalladSearch.html).

Text notes: A peeping tom watches a woman undress through a keyhole.

Tune notes: An "abba" tune in 4/4 metre, and a major key.

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