SENATE MINUTES



MAY 12, 1998

An information session was held on Tuesday, May 12, 1998, at 3:00 p.m. in Room E5004.

83. PRESENT

The President, Dr. K. Keough, Professor A. Fowler, Dean W. Blake, Mr. G. Collins, Acting Dean W. Davidson, Professor J. Dempster, Dr. C. Higgs, Mr. R. Ellis, Dr. C. Higgs, Dean G. Kealey, Dean W. Ludlow, Dean T. Murphy, Mr. L. O'Reilly, Dean T. Piper, Dean R. Seshadri, Dr. M. Volk, Ms. D. Whalen, Dr. S. Abhyankar, Dr. A. Aboulazm, Dr. R. Adamec, Dr. J. Bear, Dr. G. Bassler, Dr. J. Bear, Dr. G. Burford, Dr. G. Clark, Professor Michael Coyne, Dr. J. Evans, Dr. S. Ghazala, Professor K. Hestekin, Dr. M. Kara, Professor V. Kuester, Dr. W. Locke, Dr. R. Lucas, Dr. D. McKay, Captain W. Norman, Dr. R. Payne, Dr. N. Rich, Dr. V. Richardson, Dr. G. Sabin, Dr. S. Saha, Dr. G. Shorrocks, Dr. D. Treslan, Dr. D. Tulett, Dr. R. Venkatesan, Dr. K. Vidyasankar, Professor D. Walsh, Dr. P. Wilson, Dr. C. Wood, Mr. S. Kar, Mr. C. Corbett, Ms. K. Durant, Ms. T. O'Reilly, Mr. S. Musseau, Mr. D. Newton, Mr. J. Parsons.

A number of observers were also in attendance.

84. APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

Apologies were received from Dr. J. Tuinman, Dean I. Bowmer, Dr. D. Craig, Dr. H. Hulan and Dr. S. Wolinetz.

85. Information Session - "The First Priority"

Dr. R. Adamec introduced Dr. Maynard Clouter, Department of Physics, who at the invitation of Senate, presented an information session "The First Priority". A set of Dr. Clouter's overheads is appended to these Minutes.

Following Dr. Clouter's presentation, Senators engaged in a lengthy discussion covering the following topics:

The Chairman thanked Dr. Clouter for his presentation and for giving Senators a framework upon which to base discussions both within and without their constituencies.

ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 4:00 p.m.



MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF SENATE



MAY 12, 1998

The regular meeting of Senate was held on Tuesday, May 12, 1998, at 4:00 p.m. in Room E5004.

87. PRESENT

The President, Dr. K. Keough, Professor A. Fowler, Dean W. Blake, Mr. G. Collins, Acting Dean W. Davidson, Professor J. Dempster, Dr. C. Higgs, Mr. R. Ellis, Dr. C. Higgs, Dean G. Kealey, Dean W. Ludlow, Dean T. Murphy, Mr. L. O'Reilly, Dean T. Piper, Dean R. Seshadri, Dr. M. Volk, Professor H. Weir, Dr. S. Abhyankar, Dr. A. Aboulazm, Dr. R. Adamec, Dr. J. Bear, Dr. G. Bassler, Dr. J. Bear, Dr. G. Burford, Dr. G. Clark, Professor Michael Coyne, Dr. J. Evans, Dr. S. Ghazala, Professor K. Hestekin, Dr. M. Kara, Professor V. Kuester, Dr. W. Locke, Dr. R. Lucas, Dr. D. McKay, Captain W. Norman, Dr. R. Payne, Dr. N. Rich, Dr. V. Richardson, Dr. G. Sabin, Dr. S. Saha, Dr. G. Shorrocks, Dr. D. Treslan, Dr. D. Tulett, Dr. R. Venkatesan, Dr. K. Vidyasankar, Professor D. Walsh, Dr. P. Wilson, Dr. C. Wood, Mr. S. Kar, Mr. C. Corbett, Ms. K. Durant, Ms. T. O'Reilly, Mr. S. Musseau, Mr. D. Newton, Mr. J. Parsons.

The Chairman welcomed new Senators, Professor Michael Coyne, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College and Ms. Leanne Patey, President, Council of Students' Union, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.

A number of observers were also in attendance.

88. APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

Apologies were received from Dr. J. Tuinman, Dean I. Bowmer, Dr. D. Craig, Dr. H. Hulan and Dr. S. Wolinetz.

89. MINUTES

The Minutes of the meeting held on April 14, 1998, were taken as read and confirmed.

90. REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ON SENATE

It was agreed by separate motion where necessary, that the report of the Executive Committee be approved as follows:

90.1 Final Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on Procedures Concerning the Removal of Academic Administrators

At a meeting held on November 18, 1997, Senate was advised that in a minute of November 6, the Board of Regents had requested "The President, after consultation within and without the University community, to recommend formal procedures for dismissal or other disciplinary measures with respect to academic administrators, including Vice-Presidents, Deans, and Directors". At that meeting, Senate was advised of the action the President would be taking in regard to the consultative process.

Since the Board had already in this initiative provided for the prospect of a consultative Committee, Senate agreed to appoint an ad hoc Committee to made recommendations concerning the Removal of Academic Administrators.

It was agreed to consider the final report of the Committee which was tabled at the April 14, 1998 meeting of Senate in order to allow sufficient time for a full discussion.

It was moved by Dr. Adamec, seconded by Dr. Ghazala and carried that the Report be received with gratitude.

It was moved by Dr. Adamec, seconded by Dr. Ghazala that Senate accept and so inform the Board of Regents, the procedures outlined in the report with respect to evaluation and review of Academic Administrators with one exception, that the mid-term reviews be conducted in all terms, i.e. that the dissenting report be accepted as well.

Following considerable discussion, it was suggested by Dr. Kealey that the above motion be amended to accept the recommendations of the majority report.

Since Dr. Adamec and Dr. Ghazala accepted this suggestion as a friendly amendment, a vote was taken on the main motion as amended and it was carried by a majority vote that Senate accept, and so inform the Board of Regents, the procedures outlined in the report with regard to evaluation and review of Academic Administrators.

90.2. Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on Outstanding Issues with Regard to the Proposed Computer Engineering Programme

At a meeting held on February 10, 1998 Senate considered a proposal from the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science for a new Computer Engineering Programme to replace the existing Computer and Communication option currently offered in the Electrical Engineering Programme. The proposal was submitted to Senate by the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies which expressed its concern with regard to issues raised by the Department of Computer Science as stated in a letter dated January 9, from the Head of the Department. At the February 10 meeting of Senate a motion to approve the proposal was tabled until Senate determined whether the issues raised by the Department of Computer Science should be addressed prior to or on an on-going basis, following the approval and implementation of the proposed programme. It was then agreed that the issues with respect to the proposed Computer Engineering Programme be resolved before it is considered for approval by Senate and that an ad hoc Committee be appointed for the purpose of resolving these issues as expeditiously as possible in order that the Computer Engineering Programme might be considered no later than the May, 1998 meeting of Senate for offering in the 1998/99 academic year.

The final report of the ad hoc Committee on Outstanding Issues with Regard to the Proposed Computer Engineering Programme has now been received, together with a Minority Report. Mr. George Beckett, Chair of the ad hoc Committee on Outstanding Issues with Regard to the Proposed Computer Engineering Programme, and several other Committee members were in attendance, at the invitation of Senate, to present the Report.

Following Mr. Beckett's introduction, it was moved by Dr. Tulett, seconded by Dr. Adamec and carried that the Report of the ad hoc Committee be received with thanks.

Senate then proceeded to discuss each of the following recommendations of the ad hoc Committee:

"1. A proposed Computer Engineering programme should go ahead as proposed by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. The committee is satisfied that the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science can implement the Computer Engineering programme with or without the active cooperation of the Department of Computer Science.

2. The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and the Department of Computer Science should investigate cross-listing of courses identified as being common to both programmes. If agreement cannot be reached about cross-listing then the originating academic unit has the option to go ahead with the course provided that it has the resources to adequately support the course.

3. A joint committee should be formed to coordinate computer related instruction throughout the university curriculum. Computer education is not only an issue for Computer Science and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. Representation on the committee should include Business, Continuing Education, Science (other than Computer Science), Arts, Engineering and Computer Science. It is essential that the university take a coordinated approach to curriculum development in support of information technology needs. The moribund Computer Science/Engineering Joint Committee on Academic Issues should be subsumed into this committee.

4. Senate should make explicit the principle that academic units have the right to create interdisciplinary programmes provided that they do not unduly duplicate the programmes of other academic units. Some course overlap is to be expected with interdisciplinary programmes. Such overlap is acceptable provided that the overall programmes are not unduly duplicated.

5. It is suggested that the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and the Department of Computer Science should use the letter dated April 20, 1998 from Dr. J. Quaicoe, Chair, Discipline of Electrical Engineering as a starting point for discussions about cross-listing of courses. This letter recognizes the potential for significantly more cross-listing of courses than was identified in the original Computer Engineering proposal.

6. It is suggested that the Department of Computer Science should review its mechanisms for internal communication and consensus development. Assistance in this review may be needed from the Dean of Science and/or other university resources.

7. It is suggested that the Department of Computer Science should seek external assistance in developing a strategic plan for its programmes in the near to mid-term future. A clearer definition of the nature of the Computer Science programme, its objectives and place in the overall university curriculum would assist in resolving the serious concerns which are so evident amongst members of the department. The committee is convinced that Computer Science has equal (or potentially greater) opportunities than other units to benefit from the demand for information technology related education."

It was moved by Dr. Sabin and seconded by Dr. Davidson to accept Recommendation 1. of the Report.

Following considerable discussion, it was moved by Dr. Clark, seconded by Dr. Shorrocks and carried that the previous motion be tabled.

It was moved by Dr. Vidyasankar, seconded by Mr. Corbett and carried that the author of the minority report be given the opportunity to speak.

Dr. Middleton spoke to Senate regarding the concerns which he had raised in the Minority Report.

It was moved by Professor Fowler and seconded by Acting Dean Davidson to accept recommendations 2. and 5. of the Report.

Following a motion by Dr. Vidyasankar which was seconded by Mr. Corbett and carried, Dr. Ashoke Deb, Department of Computer Science, was permitted to address Senate regarding his concerns.

Following a lengthy discussion, it was moved by Dr. Adamec, seconded by Dr. McKay and carried that recommendation 5. be amended to also include the Minority Report by Dr. Middleton as a starting point for discussions about cross-listing of courses.

The motion to accept recommendation 2. and recommendation 5, as amended, was then carried.

At this point, the Chairman left the meeting because of another commitment and Dr. Keough assumed the Chair.

It was moved by Dr. Volk, seconded by Dean Murphy and carried that the following action be taken with regard to Recommendations 3, 4, 6 and 7:

Recommendation 3. - Refer to the Vice-President (Academic) requesting that he report back to Senate with respect to the actions taken.

Recommendation 4. - Refer to the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies for any further action which it deems necessary.

Recommendation 6. - Refer to the Acting Dean of Science.

Recommendation 7. - Refer to the Acting Dean of Science.

It was then moved by Dr. Venkatesan, seconded by Dr. Adamec and carried that Dr. Gillard, Head, Department of Computer Science, be given the opportunity to speak to Senate.

Dr. Gillard indicated his agreement with the action taken on the above recommendations.

It was moved by Dr. Treslan, seconded by Dr. Seshadri and carried, that the motion to accept Recommendation 1. and to approve the programme in Computer Engineering as proposed be lifted from the table.

It was then moved by Dr. Evans and seconded by Dr. Adamec that the proposed programme be modified in accordance with Recommendations 2. and 5. in an attempt to reduce course overlap.

It was suggested that the effect of this proposed amendment would be to change the programme and courses without reference to the Faculty Councils of Science and Engineering and Applied Science as required by the University Act. A discussion ensued regarding whether the amendment was hostile to the original motion which had been proposed to accept Recommendation 1.

Dr. Bear then moved to challenge the Chair's ruling and to entertain Evans/Adamec amendment. This motion was seconded by Dr. Adamec. The Chair then clarified that a ruling had not been made, rather Senate was engaged in a discussion as to whether the amendment was in order, and as a result the Bear/Adamec motion was not necessary.

On a call for the question, a vote was taken on the amendment which failed.

A vote was then taken on the motion of Sabin/Davidson to accept Recommendation 1.of the Report. The motion carried.

90.3 *Computer Engineering Proposal

Insert new charts as follows:

Page 322, 1997-98 Calendar, delete and replace the current flowchart of programmes. Figure 1.

Insert "Computer Engineering Curriculum" chart following the "Civil Engineering Curriculum: Construction..." chart on page 325. Figure 2.

Insert "Electrical Engineering, Class of 2002 and later" chart after the Electrical Engineering Curriculum: Computer and Communications Option Class of 2001 and later on page 329. Figure 3.

Insert the following section immediately before the heading Electrical Engineering:

"COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Computer Engineering is the design and analysis of computer systems applied to the solution of practical problems. It encompasses both hardware and software design in applications ranging from telecommunications and information systems to process control and avionics. Computer Engineering students learn the mathematics of discrete as well as continuous systems, the design of digital machines such as processors and memories, the fundamentals of software design, and the principles used in communications systems such as telephone networks and the Internet. Computer Engineering shares many fundamentals with Electrical Engineering, and these are covered in a common curriculum up to and including Term 4. Although students must decide to take Computer or Electrical Engineering prior to Term 3, they are not required to select between Computer and Electrical Engineering until the completion of Term 4. In Terms 5 and 6, students who have selected the Computer Engineering programme will take a core appropriate to the programme. In recognition of the considerable diversity of careers available to computer engineers, students are given latitude in the final three terms to choose from a wide range of electives in various speciality areas. Electives can be tailored to meet the needs of those who plan to go straight into industry as well as those who wish to join the increasing number of our graduates who are pursuing advanced degrees."

Delete the section "Electrical Engineering" and replace with the following:

"ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Electrical Engineering is a broad field involving topics from the design of motors to the design of communication systems. Areas of study include control systems, electromagnetics and antennas, power systems, electronics, communications, and computer hardware and software. Electrical Engineering shares many fundamentals with Computer Engineering, and these are covered in a common curriculum up to and including Term 4. Although students must decide to take Computer or Electrical Engineering prior to Term 3, they are not required to select between Computer and Electrical Engineering until the completion of Term 4. Upon entering Term 5, students who have selected the Electrical Engineering programme will spend a further two terms taking a core appropriate to the programme. In recognition of the considerable diversity of careers available to electrical engineers, students are given latitude in the final two terms to choose from a wide range of electives in various speciality areas. Electives can be tailored to meet the needs of those who plan to go straight into industry as well as those who wish to join the increasing number of our graduates who are pursuing advanced degrees."

Following the heading Bachelor of Engineering Degree Programme, sub-heading Programme of Study, insert the word "Computer" following the word "Civil" in the first paragraph.

Delete the second paragraph and replace with the following:

"The Engineering Programme consists of ten academic terms and six work terms. For historic reasons, the first two academic terms are designated A and B with the remaining eight being numbered one through eight. All students must complete a prescribed core of courses in the first four academic terms.

Upon entering Term 3 (the fifth Academic Term), students begin to specialize in their academic programme and must select a specialization in either (1) Civil Engineering, (2) Mechanical Engineering, (3) Ocean and Naval Architectural, or (4) Electrical and Computer Engineering. Upon entering Term 5, students in Electrical and Computer Engineering must select either the Electrical or Computer Engineering programme. Some of the courses offered in Academic Terms 3 to 8 are taken by all students, others are offered for more than one programme, but most technical courses in Academic Terms 3 to 8 are specific to the individual programmes. Students should refer to the charts preceding this section for the detailed course requirements in each phase of their programme."

Delete the word "disciplines" in the last sentence of paragraph five and replace with "programmes".

Delete the word "disciplines" in the last sentence of paragraph seven and replace with "programmes".

Add the words "and Computer" after the word "Electrical" in three places in paragraph eight.

Page 340, 1998-99 Calendar, following the heading Course Numbering delete the words "8 - Electrical Engineering" and replace with the following:

"8 - Electrical and Computer Engineering".

New Course

3422. Discrete Mathematics for Engineering. An introduction to discrete mathematics including a selection of topics such as propositional logic, introductory predicate logic, mathematical reasoning, induction, sets, relations, functions, integers, graphs, trees, and models of computation.

Delete and replace the course description for Engineering 4892 to read as follows:

"4892. Data Structures. Fundamental data structures; recursive structures and programmeming techniques; modularity and reusability; time complexity and efficient data structures; procedure abstraction; data abstraction and precise documentation of data structures."

Renumber Engineering 7861 to Engineering 5865, but do not delete Engineering 7861.

New Course

6806. Project Design Labs in Electrical/Computer Engineering. Students are expected to apply previously acquired knowledge in an integrated fashion to the solution of one or more electrical/computer engineering problems. Projects will be chosen to emphasize all phases of the development process including problem definition, design, implementation, and testing, and students will be required to demonstrate that given objectives and specifications have been met. Written and/or oral project reports will be required.

Renumber and rename "Engineering 6814 - Electromagnetics for Communications I" to "Engineering 7814 - Electromagnetics for Communications", but do not delete Engineering 6814.

Renumber Engineering 6855 to Engineering 7858, but do not delete Engineering 6855.

Delete the title for Engineering 8800 and replace with the following:

"Electrical/Computer Engineering Project".

Delete the entry for Engineering 3206 in its entirety.

Delete the entry for Engineering 8801-8809 and replace with the following:

"8801-05. Special Topics in Computer Engineering

8806-09. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering".

Figure 1.

































Figure 2.

COMPUTER ENGINEERING CURRICULUM CLASS OF 2002 AND LATER

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER CORE COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
FALL SPRING WINTER FALL SPRING WINTER FALL SPRING WINTER
TERM 3 TERM 4 TERM 5 TERM 6 TERM 7 TERM 8 TERM 6 TERM 7 TERM 8
3423

PROBABILITY &

STATISTICS

4102

ENGINEERING

ECONOMICS

COMPLEMENTARY

STUDIES

ELECTIVE

6101

ASSESSMENT

OF TECHNOLOGY

7893

SOFTWARE

ENGINEERING

8800

ELECT/COMP ENG

PROJECT

6891

FORMAL

PROG

METHODS

7855

COMMUN.

ELECTRONICS

8874

TELECOMM.

SYS. DESIGN

3821

CIRCUIT

ANALYSIS

4823

SYSTEMS &

SIGNALS I

5824

SYSTEMS &

SIGNALS II

6871

COMMUNICATIONS

PRINCIPLES

7877

VOICE & DATA

COMMUNICATIONS

8879

DIGITAL

COMMUNICATIONS

COMPUTER

SCIENCE

ELECTIVE

7814

ELECTROMAG

FOR COMMUN

8826

FILTER

SYNTHESIS

3422

DISCRETE

MATH

4423

NUMERICAL

METHODS FOR EE

5865

DIGITAL

SYSTEMS

6806

PROJECT

DESIGN LABS

7863

OPERATING SYS

& FILE ORGANIZ

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE





7944

ROBOTICS & AUTOMATION

8821

DIGITAL

SIGNAL PROC.

3891

ADVANCED

PROGRAMMING

4892

DATA

STRUCTURES

5891

DESIGN & ANALYSIS

OF ALGORITHMS

6895

SOFTWARE

DESIGN

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

7825

CONTROL

SYSTEMS II

8864

LSI DESIGN

3861

DIGITAL

LOGIC

4862

MICROPROCESSORS

5863

COMPUTER

ARCHITECTURE

6821

CONTROL

SYSTEMS I

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

7858

INDUS CNTRL &

INSTRUMEN

8893

CONCURRENT

PROGRAMMING

COMPLEMENTARY

STUDIES ELECTIVE

(Fast-track students only)

4854

ELECTRONIC

DEVICES & CIRC.

5854

ANALOG

ELECTRONICS

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

8878

IMAGE

COMMUNICATIONS



NOTES: (1) An Electrical and Computer Engineering Workshop course (480W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester, before term 3.

(2) From time to time, a technical elective may be offered in a term other than indicated on the above chart.

(3) Computer Science electives require the permission of both the Department of Computer Science and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science.

8801-8805

SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER ENGG

COMPUTER

SCIENCE

ELECTIVE







Figure 3.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM CLASS OF 2002 AND LATER

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER CORE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
FALL SPRING WINTER FALL SPRING WINTER SPRING WINTER
TERM 3 TERM 4 TERM 5 TERM 6 TERM 7 TERM 8 TERM 7 TERM 8
3423

PROBABILITY &

STATISTICS

4102

ENGINEERING

ECONOMICS

COMPLEMENTARY

STUDIES

ELECTIVE

6101

ASSESSMENT

OF TECHNOLOGY

7858

INDUSTRIAL CNTRL

& INSTRUMENT

8800

ELECT/COMP ENG

PROJECT

7846

POWER

ELECTRONICS

8846

POWER

ELECTRONIC SYS.

3821

CIRCUIT

ANALYSIS

4823

SYSTEMS &

SIGNALS I

5824

SYSTEMS &

SIGNALS II

6871

COMMUNICATIONS

PRINCIPLES

4322

THERMAL

SCIENCES

8826

FILTER

SYNTHESIS

7855

COMMUN.

ELECTRONICS

8845

POWER

SYS. OPERATION

3422

DISCRETE

MATH

4423

NUMERICAL

METHODS FOR EE

5842

ELECTROMECH.

DEVICES

6843

ROTATING

MACHINES

7844

POWER SYSTEM

ANALYSIS

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

7825

CONTROL

SYSTEMS II

8882

BIOMEDICAL

ENGINEERING

3891

ADVANCED

PROGRAMMING

4892

DATA

STRUCTURES

5432

ADVANCED

CALCULUS

6806

PROJECT

DESIGN LABS

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

7811

ANTENNAS

8813

PROPAGATION

& DIFFRACTION

3861

DIGITAL

LOGIC

4862

MICROPROCESSORS

5812

BASIC

ELECTROMAGNETICS

6813

ELECTROMAGNETIC

FIELDS

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE

7877

VOICE & DATA

COMMUNICATIONS

8821

DIGITAL

SIGNAL PROC.

COMPLEMENTARY

STUDIES ELECTIVE

(Fast-track students only)

4854

ELECTRONIC

DEVICES & CIRC.

5854

ANALOG

ELECTRONICS

6821

CONTROL

SYSTEMS I

7944

ROBOTICS &

AUTOMATION

8879

DIGITAL

COMMUN

8874

TELECOMM.

SYS DESIGN

NOTES: (1) An Electrical and Computer Engineering Workshop course (480W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester, before term 3.

(2) From time to time, a technical elective may be offered in a term other than indicated on the above chart.

5865

DIGITAL

SYSTEMS

8806-8809

SPECIAL TOPICS IN

ELECTRICAL ENGG

90.4 STUDENT APPEAL TO SENATE

MUN NO. 7663263 - Appeal for Readmission

Mrs. M. O'Dea, Deputy Registrar, was in attendance, by invitation, to present this student case since Mr. Collins had indicated that his previous involvement with this student could place him in a perceived conflict of interest position.

At a meeting held on April 30, 1998, the Executive Committee of Senate considered an appeal from the above-noted student, submitted on his behalf by his lawyer, Mr. Brian Casey.

In a memorandum dated 1 May 1998, the Executive Committee agreed to recommend to Senate that an ad hoc Committee of Senate be struck to consider this case and to report back to Senate with recommendations regarding the disposition of the students's appeal for re-admission. The Executive Committee asked the Committee on Committees to make recommendations at this meeting for membership and Terms of Reference for the ad hoc Committee if Senate is in agreement with this recommendation.

It was moved by Mrs. O'Dea, seconded by Dean Kealey and carried that the recommendation to appoint an ad hoc Committee to review the appeal of MUN No. 7663262 be accepted.

A memorandum dated May 3, 1998 was received from the Committee on Committees submitting proposed terms of reference and membership for the ad hoc Committee as follows:

1. To examine all documents presented to the Senate with regard to this case

To interview Mr. Brian Casey, Dr. M.C. Nurse and any other parties it deems necessary.

3. To conduct further investigations as the committee deems necessary.

To make recommendations to Senate in a timely fashion with regard to the appellant's application for readmission to the University.

If a recommendation is made that the appellant be readmitted to the University and that recommendation is accepted by Senate, but the appellant is subsequently denied re-admission to the Faculty of Education by that Faculty, the ad hoc Committee is to be re-convened to consider and make recommendations to Senate with regard to the disposi tion of the appellant's application for re-admission to the Faculty of Education.

Membership:

Professor Tony Dearness, Faculty of Business Administration (Chair)

Dr. Raymond Penney, Department of Psychology

Professor Michael Wallack, Department of Political Science

Mr. Gary Green, Instructional Development and Student Services, Marine Institute

Dr. Alice Gaudine, School of Nursing

Ms. Marie Donovan, Academic Advising Centre

Mr. Darren Newton, undergraduate student

It was moved by Professor Hestekin, seconded by Dr. Adamec and carried, that the Terms of Reference for the ad hoc Committee to consider the appeal of MUN Student No. 7663262 be approved.

It was then moved by Professor Hestekin, seconded by Mr. Corbett and carried, that the membership of the ad hoc Committee, as submitted, be approved.

*Report of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies

90.5 School of Physical Education and Athletics

New Course

1001. Resistance Training for Health and Activity. Course will introduce students to resistance training exercises, programmes and principles. This will necessitate both theoretical classes and practical laboratories that will involve testing and participation in resistance training activities. A portion of the assessment will also be based on regular attendance (at student convenience)

for another hour of resistance training per week certified by the attending fitness consultant.

Lectures: 3 hours per week.

Laboratory: 2 hours per week.

NOTE: This course is not available for credit for Bachelor of Physical Education students. Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 1001 and PHSD 4320 (Fitness Leadership).

Page 262, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading, Courses Available to Non-Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Students add the following to the list of courses:

"1001. Resistance Training for Health and Activity"

90.6 Bachelor of Arts with Certificate

New Programme:

"REGULATIONS FOR THE GENERAL DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH CERTIFICATE

OBJECTIVES

The degree of Bachelor of Arts with Certificate is of distinct advantage to candidates who wish to complement their studies in one or more fields of academic specialization with a programme that will help them relate their knowledge to growing sectors of the economy and to areas of increasing social concern.

The Bachelor of Arts with Certificate will assist in easing the transition of graduates to the workplace.

Individuals seeking information about specific Certificate programmes should contact the Certificate programme coordinator, the Office of the Dean of Arts, or the Office of the Registrar.

DEGREE COMPONENTS

The Bachelor of Arts with Certificate consists of the following components:

ADMISSION

Admission to the B.A. with Certificate is competitive and limited, depending on available resources. For additional admission requirements stipulated by individual Certificate programmes, see the appropriate Calendar entry.

2. Candidates for a B.A. with Certificate shall declare in writing to the Registrar's Office their intention to pursue a Certificate programme. Such a declaration shall be approved by the programme coordinator (or delegate) of the Certificate concentration before the candidate can be admitted to the B.A. with Certificate.

Candidates who have completed or in the process of completing the General Degree of Bachelor of Arts at Memorial University may convert it to a B.A. with Certificate by applying to the Registrar's Office and, upon approval of such applications by the programme coordinator of the Certificate concentration, completing the concentration of courses known as the Certificate programme in effect at the time that the candidate is accepted into the Certificate programme.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Certificate shall complete not fewer than 126 credit hours subject to the following regulations:

1. All candidates shall

a.) Satisfy the Regulations for the General Degree of Bachelor of Arts, (see above p.**) which include

(i) English requirement

(ii) Second Language requirement

(iii) Numeracy/Science requirement

(iv) Humanities requirement

(v) Social Science requirement

(vi) Research/Writing requirement

(vii) Major programme

(viii) Minor programme

b.) AND satisfy the requirements of one approved Faculty of Arts Certificate programme. For a description of such programmes see pp. ** below.

2. A Certificate programme consists of not fewer than 24 nor more than 30 credit hours, including a field component of 6 credit hours in approved instructional field placements and/or instructional field courses.

The purpose of the field component of the programme is to provide candidates with an opportunity for practical and instructional field-oriented experiences as a means of broadening and reinforcing the other courses taken in the Certificate programme. The instructional field component may take a number of forms, depending on the nature of individual programmes. Without limiting the generality of the definition, the instructional field component typically includes observation of and instruction in practical techniques and methods and their application, as well as the maintenance and submission of documentation and reports appropriate to the area of study.

3. Courses satisfying the requirements of an approved Certificate programme may also be used to satisfy requirements of the Major, Minor, Core and elective components of the degree in accordance with the regulations governing the General Degree of Bachelor of Arts.

DEPARTMENTAL REGULATIONS

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts with Certificate shall comply with such additional requirements of the appropriate Certificate programmes as are approved by the Senate.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

In order to graduate with the General Degree of Bachelor of arts with Certificate, a candidate shall obtain

An average of 60% or higher on the minimum number of courses prescribed for the Major programme, excluding 1000-level courses, and

2. An average of 60% or higher on the minimum number of courses prescribed for the Minor programme, excluding 1000-level courses, and

An average of 60% or higher on the minimum number of courses prescribed for the Certificate programme, excluding 1000-level courses, and

4. An average of 1.0 points or higher per credit hour in all applicable Faculty of Arts courses."

90.7 Department of Classics

Page 128, 1997-98 Calendar, following the entry for Classics 3270, insert the following:

3710-3729. Special Topics in Classics at Harlow (available only as part of the Harlow campus semester).

90.8 Women's Studies Programme

Page 171, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading Course List, subheading Core Courses, add the following course:

Folklore 3950. Women and Traditional Culture

90.9 Department of Folklore

New Course

3950. Women and Traditional Culture. An introduction to the ways in which women shape and/or are shaped by traditional culture. Readings and lectures will explore roles and contributions of women as folklore collectors, examine representations of women in folklore forms, and analyze women's creation of their own traditions.

90.10 Department of English

Page 131, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading, Honours Degree with English as Major Subject, amend clauses 2.h) and i) to read as follows:

h) six credit hours in two of 3152, 3181, 4041, 4050, 4051, 4060, 4061, 4251, 4821

i) six credit hours in two of 3153, 3156, 3157, 3158, 4070, 4071, 4080, 4260, 4261, 4270, 4300, 4301, 4822

90.11 Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on the Teaching of Writing - Response from the Faculty of Business Administration

A memorandum dated 1998-03-13 was received from the Faculty of Business Administration in response to a memorandum from Senate requesting that Faculty and Academic Councils act on Recommendations 1., 2. and 9. of the Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on the Teaching of Writing.

The Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies in a memorandum dated March 30, 1998 expressed its strong endorsement for the measures being taken in the Faculty of Business Administration to enhance the development and improvement of students' writing skills, and commends the Faculty for its efforts.

90.12 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Page 337 of the 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading Admission Modes delete the entry for Bridge Programme in Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering, and replace with the following:

"Bridging Programmes: The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science has bridging programmes which allow certain diploma graduates to enter the Engineering programme with advanced standing. In each case the bridging programme consists of two academic terms: Fall and Winter Semesters, followed by entry into Academic Term 4 of the appropriate discipline.

To be admitted to the bridging programme students must have graduated from the diploma programme with a cumulative average of at least 75%.

The currently approved bridging programmes are:

(i) Civil Engineering Technology from the College of the North Atlantic to the Civil Engineering Programme.

(2) Naval Architecture Programme or Marine Systems Design Programme at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University to the Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering Programme.

(3) Techniques d'architecture navale at the Institut maritime du Québec, Rimouski, to the Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering Programme.

Details of individual course requirements are outlined in the preceding charts."

Page 338, following the heading Examinations and Promotions, subheading Academic Terms, delete the current Clause 18 and replace with the following:

"18) For clear promotion during a bridging programme, students are required to have an overall average in each semester of at least 60%, and 50% in each subject. Students who fail one or more subjects but maintain an overall average of 60% qualify for a probationary promotion, subject to a re-examination in the failed subjects.

Students promoted from the Winter Term of a bridging programme will be admitted to Term 4 of the appropriate Engineering Programme."

Insert New Chart:

CHART OF THE BRIDGING Programme

FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING

FALL TERM WINTER TERM
1405 ENGINEERING

MATHEMATICS I

2422 ENGINEERING

MATHEMATICS II

3423 PROBABILITY

AND STATISTICS

2205 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS

OF ENGR MATERIALS I

3610 EARTH SCIENCES 2313 MECHANICS II
3205 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS

OF ENGR MATERIALS II

2420 STRUCTURED

ProgrammeMING

COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES ENGLISH


Page 323, 1997-98 Calendar amend Chart of the Bridging Programme for Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering as follows:

CHART OF THE BRIDGING Programme

FOR OCEAN AND NAVAL ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING



FALL TERM WINTER TERM
1405 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I 2422 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS II
3423 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 2205 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS OF ENGR MATERIALS I
3901 THERMODYNAMICS I 2313 MECHANICS II
3205 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS OF ENGR MATERIALS II 2420 STRUCTURED ProgrammeMING
COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES ENGLISH


Page 338, following the heading Examinations and Promotions, amend Clause 5)a) to read as follows:

The student must obtain credit in each of the following courses: Engineering 1000, English 1080 (or equivalent) or English 1020, Chemistry 1011 (or equivalent), Physics 1021, and Mathematics 1001."

Amend Clause 5)d) to read as follows:

"The student must obtain an average of 65% in the set of courses comprising Chemistry 1011 (or equivalent), Physics 1021 and Mathematics 1001, English 1080 (or equivalent) or English 1020, and either Engineering 1000 or three credit hours of the six credit hours specified in c)."

90.13 Bachelor of Arts with Certificate in Heritage Resources

New Programme:

"BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH CERTIFICATE IN HERITAGE RESOURCES

Programme Coordinator: Dr. G. Pocius, Department of Folklore

The certificate programme in Heritage Resources is offered to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts with Certificate degree programme and to students who wish to upgrade a general B.A. to a B.A. with Certificate. Building on the student's academic grounding in anthropology/archaeology, folklore, history, geography, and other relevant disciplines, the programme offers training in object documentation, identification, conservation, and display. Required courses give students both an awareness of the broad range of heritage resources--including objects, sites, landscapes, documents--and specific skills to deal with public perceptions of objects and artifacts. The programme also includes a course in tourism management. Elective courses enable students to pursue their particular disciplinary interests.

The B.A. with Certificate in Heritage Resources helps prepare students to work in the expanding heritage sector in Newfoundland or elsewhere. Students with this degree will be better able to compete for positions in museums and historic sites and for employment with heritage consultants and to participate in contracts involving heritage policy and planning--all part of the increasing regional and global importance of cultural tourism. The B.A. with Certificate in Heritage Resources will also be an advantage to students wishing to study heritage or cultural resources management at the graduate level.

The certificate programme in Heritage Resources draws on the expertise of the Archaeology Unit, the Centre for Material Culture Studies, and individual faculty members in various departments and faculties.

ADMISSION

Enrolment in the Certificate in Heritage Resources is limited and competitive. Students are advised to notify the Programme Coordinator in their first year if they intend to apply for this Certificate. Formal application is normally made in the second semester of the second year through the Office of the Registrar.

Academic Requirements: Applicants for the Certificate programme must satisfy the general admission requirements of the University.

CERTIFICATE REGULATIONS

Candidates shall complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of work including six credit hours of instructional field courses. These include:

Eighteen required credit hours: Material Culture, Archaeological Conservation, Collections Management, Cultural Resources Management, Introduction to Museums and Historic Sites, Tourism Management.

Six required credit hours of instructional field courses. Instructional field oriented courses will deal with a wide array of artifact-related research in historic sites/museums. These instructional field courses will be advertised by the certificate programme supervisor.

Six credit hours chosen from the "Elective Courses" listed below:

COURSE LIST

Required Courses

Anthropology 3587: Archaeological Conservation: Methods and Theory

Anthropology 3591: Collections Management

* Business 6020: Tourism Management

Folklore 3700: Museums and Historic Sites

Folklore/Anthropology 3850: Material Culture

Geography 4015: Cultural Resources Management

Elective Courses

Anthropology 3290: Newfoundland and Labrador prehistory

Anthropology 3582: Historical Archaeology

Anthropology 3584: Historical Anthropology

Folklore/MST 3001/Anthropology 3589/

History 3020: Art, Architecture and Medieval Life

Folklore 3800: Fieldwork in Vernacular Architecture: Drawings and Photography

Folklore/Anthropology/

History 3860: Vernacular Architecture

Folklore 3900: History of Western Domestic Interiors

Folklore/History 4480: Oral history

Geography 2001: Cultural Geography

Geography 3610: Cultural Landscape

History 3110: History of Newfoundland to 1815

Instructional Field Courses

Instructional Field courses are available in a number of departments, including:

- Anthropology

- Folklore

- Geography

* Special Topics Course - Faculty of Business Administration"

90.14 Department of Folklore

New Courses:

3700. Museums and Historic Sites. An introduction to museums and historic sites, their work, and their role in societies past and present. Various types of museums and historic sites will be discussed using local, national and international examples, looking at their collections and exhibitions policies. Practical issues will also be discussed; these include museum exhibit display techniques, public programming, virtual museums, and the museum profession.

3800. Fieldwork in Vernacular Architecture: Drawings and Photography. This course will provide the technical background required for documenting vernacular architecture, with an emphasis on drawings, photography, and computer simulations. A group fieldwork project will involve using both computer and mechanical methods of recording, and usually focus on the documentation of St. John's buildings.

3900. A History of Western Domestic Interiors. A survey of domestic interiors from the 17th to the 20th century, focusing on British and Newfoundland examples. Much of the course will involve case studies of specific objects from public and private collections. A selection of the following domestic furnishings will be examined: furniture, glassware, ceramic ware, metalware and textiles.

Page 135, following the heading Folklore, sub-heading Major in Folklore amend Clauses (c) and (d) to read as follows:

(c) six credit hours from Group B - Folklife Genres:

3001, 3606, 3700....4460.

(d) six credit hours from Group C - Topics: not more than....1050, 1060, 3800, 3900....4480.

90.15 Department of Geography

New Course

4015. Cultural Resource Management. This course is a study of cultural resource management; the definition and recognition of cultural resources, the application of policy in managing cultural resources, and the identification and consideration of contemporary issues in cultural resource management.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of seminar per week.

90.16 Department of Anthropology

New Course:

A/P 3591. Collections Management. This course will introduce students to the problems of collections storage with respect to environment, materials and artifact access. Students will become familiar with the materials encountered in archaeological and ethnographic collections. The storage of specific historic and prehistoric collections from Newfoundland and Labrador will be examined with the purpose of providing practical examples of methodology.

90.17 Department of Philosophy

A submission for Philosophy 1600, 2800, 2805 and 2809 to be offered as Research/Writing Courses was received. At a meeting held on February 10, 1998 Senate approved calendar changes to the Department of Philosophy section of the calendar stating that Philosophy 1200, 1600, 2200 and 2800-2810 may qualify as Research/Writing courses for the Bachelor of Arts Core requirements; therefore no additional calendar change is required.

This item was received for information.

90.18 Department of French and Spanish

Pages 141-143, 1997-98 Calendar, delete the entries for French 4030 to 4233 inclusive and 4500 to 4600 inclusive in their entirety.

New Courses

4610. Movement Littéraire I. Historie de la littérature d'expression française à travers l'étude d'un mouvement ou d'un courant littéraire jusqu'au romantisme (et l'indépendamment des genres): courtoisie, libertinage, libre pensée, baroque, humanisme, classicisme, romanticisme, etc.

Préalable(s): Deux d'entre 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504

4610. Literary Movement I: French literary history through the study of a movement or trend in literature up to romanticism: courtoisie, libertinage, libre pensée (free thought), the baroque, humanism, classicism, romanticism, etc.

Prerequisite(s): Two of: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4620. Mouvement Littérature II. Histoire de la littérature d'expression française à travers l'étude d'un mouvement ou d'un courant littéraire à partir du réalisme (et indépendamment des genres): réalisme, naturalisme, symbolisme, surréalisme, existentialisme, féminisme, postmodernisme, absurde, nouveau roman, roman du terroir, etc.

Préalable(s): Deux d'entre: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504

4620. Literary Movement II: French literary history through the study of a movement or trend in literature since realism: realism, naturalism, symbolism, surrealism, existentialism, feminism, postmodernism, the absurd, nouveau roman, roman du terroir, etc.

Pre-requisite(s): Two of 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4630. Genre Littéraire I. Étude d'un genre littéraire à travers une littérature d'expression française et à travers les siécles; quelques genres dits traditionnels (poésie, romanesque, théâtre): poéme, épopée, roman, conte, nouvelle, tragédie, comédie, drame.

Préalable(s): Deux d'entre: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4630. Literary Genre I. Study of a genre from French-literature of different periods to be chosen among the traditional or canonical forms (poetry, narrative fiction, theatre): poem, epic, novel, short story, novella tragedy, comedy, drama.

Prerequisite(s): Two of: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4640.Literary Genre II. Etude d'un genre littéraire à travers une littérature d'expresion française et à travers les siécles; les autres genres (littéraires et paralittéraires): essai, pamphlet, manifeste; mémoires, journal, autobiographie; littérature fantastique; paralittérature (best-sellers, policier, espionnage, science fiction, etc).

Préalable(s): Deux d'entre: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4640. Literary Genre II. Study of a genre from French-language literature of different periods to be chosen among other literary and popular genres such as: essay, tract, manifesto; memoirs, diary, autobiography; personal writing, fantasy, best sellers, detective novel, spy novel, science fiction, etc.

Prerequisite(s): Two of: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4650. Critique Littéraire Approche d'un corpus particulier (textes de différents auteurs ou d'un auteur) par l'intermédiare de la critique littéraire: symbolique, thématique, mythocritique, sociocritique, psychocritique, philocritique, historie de la critique, etc.

Préalable(s): Deux d'entre: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4650. Literary Criticism. using a critical perspective, a particular selection of literary works will be studied. The critical approach may be any of the following: symbolics, thematics, mythocriticism, sociocriticism, psychocriticism, philocriticism, history of criticism, etc.

Prerequisite(s): Two of: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504.

4660. Théorie Littéraire. Approche d'un corpus particulier par l' intermédiaire de la théorie littéraire, theorie de la littérature sémiotique, pragmatique, herméneutique, rhétorique, poétique, narratologie, philosophie, psychoanalyse, etc.

Prélable(s): Deux d'entre: 3500, 3501, 3502, 2503, 3504

4660. Literary Theory. Using a theoretical perspective, a particular selection of literary works will be studied. The theoretical approach may be any of the following: theory of literature, semiotics, pragmatics, hermeneutics, rhetoric, poetics, narratology, philosophy, psychoanalysis, etc.

Pre-requisite(s): Two of: 3500, 3501, 3502, 3503, 3504

Page 138, following the heading Honours Degree in French, amend clauses (i) and (ii) in a) Language Option (Honours Degree in French) to read as follows:

(i) As for the major in French with the addition of 4701 and 4750

(ii) At least three other 4000-level French courses

Delete the current course title for the French version of French 3506 and replace with the following:

"Cinéma francophone"

91.19 Review of Academic Regulations in the Context of Retention Efforts

A memorandum dated 1998-04-03 was received from Faculty of Business Administration in response to a memorandum from Senate requesting that Faculties and Schools act on Recommendation 1.(ii) of the Report of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies Sub-Committee to Review Academic Regulations in the Context of Retention Efforts.

This response was received for information.

90.20 Motion to Extend the Meeting

It was moved by Dr. Rich, seconded by Dr. Adamec and carried, that the meeting be extended until 6:50 p.m. or later to permit completion of business.

90.21 Sir Wilfred Grenfell College

A proposal from Sir Wilfred Grenfell College for a Summer Bridging Programme to be offered as a pilot project for 1998 was approved.

The proposal developed by Sir Wilfred Grenfell College reads as follows:

A three-week residential Summer Bridging Programme to be offered at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College is proposed as a pilot project for 1998. The purpose is to provide upgrading and university preparation for a select number of students who failed to achieve the 70% high school leaving average required for admission to Memorial University. Entry into the Programme will be competitive. Students entering the Programme must have an average of at least 65% in the courses required for admission to the University. Applicants will be required to write a formal letter of application, provide three letters of reference, and present themselves for an interview either in person or by telephone. Applications will be screened by the Committee on Special Admissions. Suitable applicants will be granted final acceptance to the University. Students who successfully complete the Programme will be permitted to continue their studies in the fall semester. Students who do not successfully complete the programme will not be permitted to continue and their admission at a future date will be contingent upon their meeting admission requirements as stated in the University Calendar.

Report of the Academic Council of the School of Graduate Studies

90.22 Faculty of Education

Page 407, 1997-98 University Calendar, following the heading Regulations Governing the Degree of Master of Education, delete the current clause A)1.a) and replace with the following:

"A)1.a) have from a recognized institution, either (i) an undergraduate degree with at least second class standing, or (ii) an undergraduate degree and an average of at least 70% in the last 90 attempted undergraduate credit hours."

90.23 Department of French and Spanish

Page 401, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading French and Spanish, sub-heading Courses, delete the subheading "Series A" and replace with "Methods Series". Delete the sub-heading "Series B" and replace with "Corpus Series".

Following the heading Français, subheading Cours, delete the subheading "Série A" and replace with "Série Méthodes". Delete the sub-heading "Série B" and replace with "Série Corpus".

Page 416, following the heading French and Spanish, subheading Courses, delete the subheading "Series A" and replace with "Methods Series". Delete the sub-heading "Series B" and replace with "Corpus Series".

Page 401, following the heading French and Spanish, sub-heading Courses, delete "6012. History of the French Language", from Series A, and insert "6102. History of the French Language" in Series B.

Following the heading Français, subheading Cours, delete "6012. Histoire Du

Français" from Série A, and insert "6102. Histoire Du Français" in Série B.

Page 416, following the heading French and Spanish, subheading Master of Philosophy, delete "6012. History of the French Language", from Series A, and insert "6102. History of the French Language" in Series B.

90.24 Environmental Engineering Programme

New Courses

Environmental Impact Assessment

Air, Noise and Water Pollution

Waste Water and Hazardous Waste Management

Environmental Engineering Laboratory 1

Environmental Engineering Laboratory 2

Soil Remediation Engineering

Delete

Landfill Design and Site Remediation

Soil Contaminant Interaction

Delete the current title for Env. Sci/Eng. 6006 (cross listed as Eng. 9603) and replace with "Environmental Management Systems for Industry".

Page 394-395, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading Regulations governing the degrees of Master of Applied Science in Environmental Engineering and Applied Science.

Delete the current Clause C.2.c) and replace with the following:

"Students are required to complete Eng. 9604, Eng. 9617 - 9620 and 18 additional credit hours from Env.Sci./Eng. 6001 - 6006, Eng. 9606 - 9621 or from appropriate University courses. The programme will normally include at least 21 credit hours offered by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science."

90.25 Department of Philosophy

Page 404, 1997-98 Calendar, delete the current entry in its entirety, and replace with the following:

"PHILOSOPHY

Professor and Head of Department

David Thompson

The degree of Master of Arts is offered in Philosophy by full-time or part-time study. The programme is designed so that it may be completed in one academic year (three semesters) of full-time study.

The candidate must complete 15 credit hours -- 3 credit hours from 6000, 9 credit hours from 6011-6016, any 3 credit hours from 6101-6102 -- and a thesis.

Normally, a full-time candidate will complete all the 15 credit hours and submit a thesis proposal by the end of the second semester of study. A minimum of one additional semester will be spent in completing the balance of the programme.

COURSES

Graduate Seminar.

Author Seminars:

6011. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy.

Modern Philosophy.

Contemporary Philosophy.

Area Seminars:

Metaphysics.

6015. Theory of Knowledge

6016. Ethical and Political Theory

Tutorials:

Selected Texts.

Current Issues.

6040-6099. Special Topics"

90.26 Department of German and Russian

Page 402, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading German and Russian, subheading Courses, insert the following special topics block of courses after the entry for "7001. Special Subject or Author II":

"7002-7020. Special Topics in German Studies"

Page 403, following the heading Deutsch, subheading Kurse, insert the following special topics block of courses after "7001. Wahlthema Oder-Autor II":

"7001-7020. Wahlthemen in German Studies"

90.27 Department of Folklore

Page 441, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading Doctor of Philosophy, delete the current clause 3 in its entirety and replace with the following:

"Foreign Language Requirement:

a) All Ph.D. candidates are required to demonstrate an adequate reading knowledge of a second language--normally a common, modern language.

b) Reading knowledge is defined as a minimum B grade in a second-year language course taken within the previous five years, or performance satisfactory to the department in an arranged reading proficiency test.

c) The selection of a second language can be based on the student's research requirements.

d) The selection of a second language must be made in consultation with student's faculty advisor or supervisor. Confirmation that the choice is acceptable must be obtained from the Department.

e) The language requirement must normally be fulfilled before a student takes the Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination."

90.28 Faculty of Education

New Courses

6467 Quantitative Research Methods

6468 Critical Approaches to Educational Research

90.29 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

New Programme

"DIPLOMA IN ADVANCED STUDIES IN SAFETY, RISK AND INTEGRITY ENGINEERING

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

This programme has been designed to meet the needs of engineers, technologists, safety and risk officers, insurers and asset managers who are attempting to protect and manage an asset and people under risk and uncertainty. This programme will appeal to personnel in industries such as oil and gas, nuclear, airlines and other industries where safety, risk and asset management are paramount. The programme consists of three components:

(a) 6 compulsory core courses

(b) 6 electives from a group of technical courses

(c) 1 project course

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

This programme is the responsibility of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and is intended for professional engineers. Applications for admission should be made to the programme on appropriate forms available from Continuing Engineering Education, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. Entry to the programme is not normally restricted to any particular time of year, rather completed applications are judged by an Admissions Committee as soon as possible after they reach the CEE office. To ensure that applications are processed as quickly as possible, applicants should provide complete documentation and transcripts with the application form.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Normal entrance requirement is one of the following:

(a) Membership in the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Newfoundland (APEGN).

(b) A Bachelor of Engineering degree from a recognized university, and three years experience in engineering work.

Individuals who do not possess the qualifications listed above may be admitted to the programme if they can satisfy the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science that they have qualifications and experience which ensure a reasonable chance of success in the programme.

CREDIT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES

Under certain conditions credit may be given for courses offered by the School of Graduate Studies. Credit must be approved by the Continuing Engineering Education Committee. Graduate courses shall count as 3 credit hours and the total number of credit hours obtained from graduate courses shall not exceed 6.

FORMAT

The format of the courses offered as part of this programme will normally be classroom lectures. Some courses will have tutorials. Courses will be offered

in evening time slots. Courses will be scheduled in advance of each term. At least two courses per term will be offered. For students who cannot attend all classroom sessions an internet service is being planned.

EVALUATION

Each course in the diploma programme will contain an evaluation procedure established by the instructor for that course. A mark of 60% must be achieved in each course taken in order to obtain credit.

FACULTY

Most courses are offered by a team of instructors drawn from the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, OIS Fisher and other specialists from industry.

PERIOD OF STUDY

Normally a participant will complete the Diploma Programme in Advanced Studies in Risk, Safety and Integrity Engineering in two years. If the participant cannot complete it in two years, the student may apply to the Diploma Committee for an extension which may be granted for one year. A maximum of three extensions may be granted. This means that the total extended period including the normal time of two years will not exceed five years.

LIST OF COURSES

CORE COURSES

ENGC 9000. Basic Safety, Reliability, Risk Concepts and Legislation (3 credit hours). Natural and man-made hazards; measures of safety and reliability; accident and failure statistics; fatal accident and serious injury rates; societal risks; technical versus human reliability; safety management systems; introduction to safety and reliability terminology; risk; assessment techniques; HAZOP; classical reliability theory; modelling of engineering systems as series and parallel systems; redundancy; fault trees and event trees; availability and maintainability. Failure mode and effect criticality analysis (FMECA). Canadian and international legislation.

ENGC 9001. Statistical Quality Control and Design of Industrial Experiments (3 credit hours). Revision of elementary concepts in statistics and probability; important uni-variate distributions; the bi-variate and multi-variate distribution, normal distribution, parameter estimation and goodness, of-fit; analysis of statistical data; treatment of outliers; analysis of variance; introduction to continuous and discrete stochastic processes; Gaussian, Poisson.

ENGC 9002. Uncertainty, Risk and Reliability Analysis for Engineers (3 credit hours). Uncertainties, risks, and the consideration of reliability are unavoidable in the design and planning of any engineering project. However, in order that we can evaluate their significance on our project's performance and design, we must have a knowledge of the concepts and methods for evaluating these uncertainties, risks and reliability.

ENGC 9003. Risk and Decision Analysis Applied to Engineering Systems (3 credit hours)

Basic concepts - definitions of probability and risk, framework of decision-making, decisions under uncertainty, risk assessment and risk management. Probabilistic design. Probability theory - Review of relevant probability distributions, load and resistance, system failure, extreme events and their analysis. Consequences ­ decision trees, expected value criteria, utility, criteria for optimal decisions under uncertainty.

ENGC 9004. Advanced Reliability and Risk Analysis (3 credit hours).

First-order reliability methods; second-order reliability methods; introduction to systems analysis; extreme type distributions; correlated distributions; FORM for non-normal variables; Monte Carlo simulation techniques; directional simulations; importance sampling; software for reliability analysis.

ENGC 9005. Technical Communications (3 credit hours). Techniques to assist engineers to write business letters and reports with courtesy, clarity and impact will be learned and practiced using wordprocessing software. The student will also learn how to prepare effective oral presentations.

9006. Required Engineering Project. Supervised individual project.

ELECTIVE COURSES

Registrants are required to select 2 courses from Group A, 1 course from Group B and 1 course from Group C. The remainder of the courses may be taken from groups A, B or C.

GROUP A ­ TECHNICAL

ENGC 9007. Corrosion Engineering (3 credit hours). Forms of corrosion; passivity; electrochemical free energy; activation polarization; concentration polarization; exchange current density; equilibrium and half-cell potentials; Nernst equation; free corrosion potential; Evans diagrams; Pourbaix diagrams; internal corrosion monitoring; external corrosion monitoring; materials selection; poisons; oxygen scavengers; corrosion inhibitors; cathodic protection; anodic protection; coatings and linings; coating failures and surface preparation.

ENGC 9008. Fire and Explosion Engineering (3 credit hours)

Introduction to fire science; fire prevention; containment and extinguishment; methods of assessment of fire risks; hydrocarbon fires and explosions; methods of estimating explosion overpressures; dynamic response of structures to sudden overpressures; explosion detection, control and mitigation techniques; active and passive fire protection systems; escape routes; legal requirements; fire code upgrade.

ENGC 9009. Introduction to Petroleum Technology (3 credit hours). Basic geology; petroleum geology; hydrocarbon properties; reservoirs; reservoir flow dynamics.

ENGC 9010. Introduction to Sub-Sea Technology (3 credit hours).

Engineering review of structures; vessels and equipment used for production offshore; sub-sea production overview; underwater techniques; physiological aspects of diving; fluid transportation.

ENGC 9011. Introduction to Drilling Technology (3 credit hours). The drilling system and equipment; flow of drilling fluids; drilling; offshore drilling and operations; well pressure control.

ENGC 9012. Reliability of Software, Safety Critical Electrical/Electronic Systems (3 credit hours). Introduction to software reliability; modelling; evaluation of software reliability; safety critical systems; safety aspects of computer control. Introduction to electrical machines and power electronics; fault calculations; condition monitoring of electrical machines and drives; quantitative methods of reliability assessment.

ENGC. 9013 Reliability of Structural Systems (3 credit hours). Fundamentals of structural reliability; strength and load processes; structural analysis methods for system reliability, reliability of structural systems under time varying loads; effects of redundancy, modelling of basic variables, review of software packages for structural systems; application to bridges and offshore structures; reliability updating techniques.

ENGC 9014. Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics (3 credit hours). Review of fatigue and fracture theory; methods of non-destructive examination; reliability of NDE; introduction to PD 6493 fracture assessment; reliability-based fatigue analysis; probabilistic methods of fracture assessment; probability-based inspection planning strategies; application to offshore structures.

GROUP B ­ ENVIRONMENTAL

ENGC 9015. Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3 credit hours).

The physical environment and ecosystems; principles of hydrology; water supply and waste water treatment, modelling of air and water pollution; sources of industrial pollution; water quality.

ENGC 9016. Toxic Waste Management (3 credit hours). Management of toxic and hazardous waste; radioactive waste disposal; stabilization of hazardous waste.

ENGC 9017. Environmental Risk Analysis (3 credit hours). Environmental consequences from routine and accidental industrial incidents; short and long term effects; environmental protection structures; risk analysis applied to the environment.

GROUP C ­ ERGONOMICS

ENGC 9018. Overview and Introduction to Ergonomics (3 credit hours).

Introduction to physiology; man and the environment, biomechanics, occupational and industrial psychology.

ENGC 9019. Introduction to Occupational Medicine (3 credit hours).

Human attention, vigilance and error; introduction to anthropometry; presentation and display of information; mental workload, respiratory protection, survival in extreme conditions.

ENGC 9020. Introduction to Occupational Hygiene (3 credit hours).

Introduction to epidemiology, analyzing work and work station design; manual handling upper limb and back disorders."

Page 50, 1997-98 Calendar, following the heading General Academic Regulations, subheading A. Explanation of Terms, insert the following after clause A.2.c.v:

"vi. Credit Hours: All courses in the programme are 3 credit hours, with the exception of the Engineering Project Course which is 6 credit hours."

90.30 Proposed Changes to the Diploma in Information Technology

At a meeting of Senate held on April 14, 1998, the Terms of Reference of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies were amended to authorize that Committee to examine courses and proposals for non-degree programmes arising from the School of Continuing Education and for the membership of the Committee to include the Chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Continuing Education or its equivalent.

At a meeting of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies held on April 23, 1998, consideration of Revisions to the Diploma Programme in Information Technology was deferred pending the addition of the Chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Continuing Education to the membership roster.

A memorandum dated April 29, 1998 has now been received from the Associate Executive Director, School of Continuing Education, requesting that, in light of the urgency to obtain approval for changes in the Diploma Programme in Information Technology, Senate consider these calendar changes.

Following consideration, it was moved by Ms. Whalen, seconded by Dr. Murphy and carried that the following changes to the Diploma Programme in Information Technology be approved:

Page 115 of the 1998-99 Calendar, delete the entry for the Diploma in Information Technology in its entirety and replace with the following:

"DIPLOMA Programme IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

The Diploma in Information Technology is designed to provide individuals already possessing a post-secondary degree or diploma in any field with the knowledge and skills required to work in today's high technology environment. The programme will benefit individuals from a wide variety of backgrounds, including business, education, technical and administrative. The programme consists of three consecutive full-time semesters or nine consecutive part-time semesters. A programme fee will be determined in advance of each academic year.

Programme Objectives

Graduates of the programme will:

1) Enhance their academic and other credentials with practical skills in information technology.

2) Obtain skills and knowledge that will prepare them to work effectively within a high technology environment.

3) Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a team.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Diploma in Information Technology normally must have successfully completed a degree or diploma from an accredited post-secondary institution. Admission to the programme is limited and competitive. Application must be made in writing to the Registrar's Office on the appropriate form and must include an official transcript of post-secondary marks.

Registration

The diploma can be completed on either a full-time or part-time basis. Courses for part-time students will consist of evening and weekend sessions; however, part-time students must be formally admitted to the programme prior to enrolling in courses restricted to the Diploma and will be required to have at least one year of full-time work experience or equivalent.

Programme Requirements

The Diploma in Information Technology consists of a set curriculum of 20 courses. All courses are specifically designed for the Diploma in Information Technology only, and are not applicable towards any other existing degree or diploma programme. Students enrolled in the full-time programme will be required to complete a work term component. Students opting to complete the programme on a part-time basis must do so within three calendar years (nine consecutive semesters)from the date of admission to the programme. A substantial project will be required of each participant prior to completion of the part-time programme.

Evaluation

The pass mark for each course is 75%. Evaluation may include, but not be limited to, any or all of the following: projects, assignments, examinations, and class participation.

Continuation in the Programme

Participants may request permission, in writing, to complete remedial work or be re-evaluated in a course in which they have not obtained a passing grade. Students will be granted this option no more than once in any given course and no more than three times in the programme.

Transfers

Students admitted to the full-time programme may request permission to transfer to the part-time programme prior to the start of the third week of the first semester only. Transfers will not normally be considered after this date. All transfers are contingent on seat availability.

Students admitted to the part-time programme may request permission to transfer to the full-time programme after completion of the first semester only, and prior to the start of the second semester. Tranfers will not normally be considered after the first semester. All transfers are contingent on seat availability. Students who transfer to the full-time programme are liable for the current full-time programme fee.

Challenge for Credit

Challenge for credit for a limited number of courses may be considered on an individual basis. Skills assessment testing will take place prior to the commencement of the programme. Students who have successfully completed equivalent degree-credit courses at this university may upon application be awarded transfer credit, provided they have obtained a minimum of 75% in such courses.

Awarding of Diploma

Once all course requirements for the Diploma in Information Technology have been successfully completed, application for awarding of the Diploma must be made in writing on the appropriate form to the Office of the Registrar.

COURSE LIST

Note: All courses, unless otherwise noted, consist of laboratory and classroom sessions.

1000. Computer Technology. This course provides an overview of computer technology and introduces computer basics. Students will become familiar with the basic parts of computer systems and their functions while learning troubleshooting techniques and distinguishing between hardware and software problems. Configuring hardware through the operating system and component failure will be discussed. Understanding of these topics will be enhanced by dismantling and assembling a computer. Students will become familiar with the alphanumeric keyboard through demonstration and practice. This course is a Prerequisite for all other Information Technology courses.

2100. Operating Systems I. A study of basic DOS commands. Features and benefits of the Windows environment will be discussed in detail.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 1000.

2200. Network Operating Systems I. A study of the most commonly used network operating systems. Topics include fundamentals of LAN theory; LAN protocols; network topologies; network security; basic network communication options; and network management.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

2300. Internet Applications. A study of the Internet and its applications. Topics will include advanced searching techniques, programmeming languages used in developing applications for the World Wide Web, and creating and maintaining WWW sites.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

2400. Office Suites. A study of the applications of office suites, and integration of commonly used computer software. Various office suite products will be compared and contrasted.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 1000.

2410. Multi-media Presentations. A study of techniques and appropriate software used in preparing multi-media presentations. Skills will be enhanced through practice sessions.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

3100. Operating Systems II. A study of more advanced DOS features. Topics include: configuring and reconfiguring computer systems, creating batch files, file organization and editing, and configuring files.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

3110. Unix Operating System. A study of the basic functions of Unix. Topics include: operating systems, simple shell techniques, file editing, command filtering, and piping.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

3200. Network Operating Systems II. A continuation of the more advanced features of network operating systems.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2200.

3300. Fundamentals of Programming. An overview of the fundamentals of structured programming and the importance of planning ahead and good programme design.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

3310. Windows Programming. A study of the fundamental elements of programming in a Windows environment. Topics will include: building a Windows Graphical Interface and the introductory concepts of object-oriented programming.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 3300.

3320. Programming with Databases. A study of applications basics, basic data types, understanding objects and collections, coding for events, writing RDBMS, controlling programmes, testing and debugging the application, run-time errors, and distributing the application.

Prerequisites: Information Technology 3300 and Information Technology 3400.

3330. Object-Oriented Programming. An introduction to OOP languages. Topics will include: using OOP to produce custom mini-applications; incorporating applets into WWW pages; and providing functionality such as animation, live updating and secure two-way interaction.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 3310.

3340. Introduction to Programming with Oracle. An introductory course to developing applications in the Oracle environment. Topics include: DBMS and SQL, defining and manipulating objects in SQL, controlling security and maintaining data integrity in SQL, and using the PL/SQL language.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 3300.

3400. Business Software Applications. A study of the advanced features of software applications studied in Information Technology 2400.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2400.

3410. Project Planning. A study of the tools and techniques of project management. Appropriate software will be studied and incorporated into class projects.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

3420. Publishing and Document Management. A comprehensive look at standard methods and techniques of communicating technical information. Topics will include the principles of desktop publishing, applications, requirements, and appropriate software.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

3430. Intranets. A study of the cross-platform nature of Web Browsers and how this impacts company-based information systems. Topics include: determining what is suitable for publication on an Intranet, groupware, security measures and other related technical issues.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 2100.

3440. Integrated Business Solutions. An introduction to the techniques involved in analyzing a company's information technology needs, and designing a customized solution.

Prerequisites: Information Technology 2100 and 2400.

4500. Case Study / Student Project. (Restricted to students in the part-time programme.) A comprehensive analysis of an assigned case. A written report will be required. Skills and knowledge developed throughout the programme will be utilized in solving business-related problems. Using a case approach, students will work in teams to evaluate a company's IT resources and prepare a proposal for a solution that will meet the company's needs. A plan will be generated with suitable phases for implementing the solution. Evaluation will be based on effectiveness of the solution, demonstrated understanding of methodology and available technology, and the clarity, conciseness, and logic of the presentation style.

Prerequisites: Information Technology 3400 and Information Technology 3440, or approval of the Director of the School of Continuing Education, or delegate.

4600. Work Term. (Restricted to students in the full-time programme.) The purpose of the work term is to provide opportunities for students in the information technology programme to apply theories and skills learned in the classroom to workplace settings. As one component of the work term the student is required to complete a work report which should:

analyze an issue/problem related to the student's work environment

demonstrate an understanding of the structure of a professional report

show competence in written communication and presentation skills.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 3400 and Information Technology 3440."

90.31 Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on the Teaching of Writing

Memoranda dated 25 March, 1998 and March 31, 1998 were received from the Faculty Council of Arts and the Faculty Council of Engineering and Applies Science respectively in response to the recommendations outlined in the Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on the Teaching of Writing.

These memoranda were received for information.

90.32 Senate ad hoc Committee on Course Evaluations - Progress Report

A memorandum dated April 20, 1998 was received from the Chair of the Senate ad hoc Committee on Course Evaluations advising that it is anticipated that the final report of the Committee will be available for the September, 1998 meeting of Senate.

This item was received for information.

90.33 Resource Implications of New Programmes

A memorandum dated April 21, 1998 was received from the Executive Committee of Senate advising that at a meeting held on March 26, 1998, the Executive Committee agreed that the resource implications to existing programmes at both the undergraduate levels must be considered for all proposed new programmes, whether undergraduate or graduate. The Executive Committee made the following recommendations to Senate:

1. Ask the Committee on Committees to recommend to Senate a modification to term of reference 3(e) of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies adding the phrase "both undergraduate and graduate" between the words "programmes" and "may" on line 3. This is designed to ensure that the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies considers the resource implication of proposed new undergraduate programmes on existing programmes both at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

2. Ask the Academic Council of the School of Graduate Studies to consider the adoption of a by-law to parallel the modified term of reference 3(e) of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies referred to in (1) above. This is designed to ensure that the Academic Council of the School of Graduate Studies considers the resource implications of proposed new graduate programmes on existing programmes both at the graduate and undergraduate levels.

3. Ask the Committee on Committees to recommend to Senate an addition to the terms of reference of the Executive Committee of Senate as an extra safeguard to ensure that the resource implications of all proposed new programmes on existing undergraduate and graduate programmes are properly considered before such proposals are forwarded to Senate for approval.

It was agreed that the Committee on Committees and the Academic Council of Graduate Studies be asked to take the necessary action with regard to these recommendations.

90.34 Report of the Senate Elections Committee

Senate Elections

A memorandum dated April 27, 1998 was received from the Committee on Senate Elections advising that the following people have been elected/re-elected to the Senate for a term of office commencing September 1, 1998, and expiring August 31, 2001, except in the case of Mr. Michael Coyne whose term of office expires on August 31, 1999:

CONSTITUENCY NAME

Business

Dr. Sudhir K. Saha

Dr. David Tulett

Education

Dr. Glenn Clark

Dr. Dennis Treslan

Humanities

Mr. Peter Ayres

Dr. Vance Maxwell

Ms. Donna Walsh

Marine Institute

Dr. Azmy F. Aboulazm

Mrs. Catherine Dutton

Mr. Derek Howse

Mr. Bruce Whitelaw

Medicine

Dr. John Bear

Nursing

Dr. Maureen Laryea

Social Work

Dr. Ross Klein

Sir Wilfred Grenfell College

Dr. Holly Pike

Mr. Michael Coyne

Presidential Search Committee

A memorandum dated May 5, 1998 was received from the Secretary of Senate advising that the election process has now been completed with regard to the selection of four faculty members to serve on the Presidential Search Committee from the four groups as agreed at the April 14 meeting of Senate. The following four faculty members have been selected to serve on the Search Committee

Dr. William Kennedy, Faculty of Education

Dr. Christopher A. Sharpe, Social Sciences

Dr. Robin Moore-Orr, Faculty of Medicine

Dr. Robert Adamec, Science

90.35 Search Committee for Vice-President (Academic)

This correspondence was received for information.

91. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 6:50 p.m.


[MUN]"
Last Modified September 9, 1998 by Marion Gregory
mgregory@morgan.ucs.mun.ca