SENATE MINUTES

FEBRUARY 11, 1997

The regular meeting of Senate was held on Tuesday, February 11, 1997, at 4:00 p.m. in Room E5004.

59. PRESENT

The President, The Chancellor, Dr. K. Keough, Dr. K. Bindon, Dean W. Blake, Mr. G. Collins, Mr. R. Ellis, Dean G. Kealey, Professor M. Lamb, Dr. G. Gardner (for Dean A. Law), Dean W. Ludlow, Dean T. Murphy, Mr. L. O'Reilly, Dr. J. Pennell, Dr. W. Redden, Dean R. Seshadri, Acting Dean D. Whalen, Dr. M. Volk, Dr. S. Abhyankar, Dr. A. Aboulazm, Dr. R. Adamec, Dr. G. Bassler, Dr. J. Bear, Professor L. Bennett, Professor A. Chadwick, Dr. S. Chandra, Dr. W. Davidson, Dr. G. Gunther, Dr. M. Haddara, Professor K. Hestekin, Dr. O. Janzen, Dr. R. Lucas, Dr. I. Mazurkewich, Dr. M. Mulligan, Dr. D. McKay, Dr. M. Paul, Dr. N. Rich, Dr. V. Richardson, Dr. G. Sabin, Dr. S. Saha, Dr. D. Treslan, Dr. C. Turner, Dr. K. Vidyasankar, Professor Y. Walton, Professor D. Walsh, Dr. H. Williams, Dr. S. Wolinetz, Mr. K. Smedbol, Mr. D. Baker, Mr. S. Ennis, Mr. M. Harvey, Ms. D. Johnston, Mr. S. Musseau, Mr. B. Penney.

60. APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

Dr. J. Tuinman, Dean T. Piper, Dr. G. Burford, Dr. W. Locke, Dr. V. Maxwell, Dr. R. Payne, Dr. D. Tulett, Dr. C. Wood.

61. MINUTES

The Minutes of the regular and special meetings held on January 14, 1997 were taken as read and confirmed.

62. Report of the Committee on Honorary Degrees and Ceremonial

62.1 Nomination for the Award of an Honorary Degree

The name of a candidate recommended by the Committee on Honorary Degrees and Ceremonial was presented to Senate for awarding of a doctoral degree honoris causa. Dean Murphy made a brief statement about the candidate and members were given the opportunity to discuss the merits of the candidate before voting. Upon voting by a show of hands, the candidate was approved by at least a two-thirds majority vote.

62.2 Recommendation for the Position of University Marshal

A memorandum dated February 10, 1997, was received from the Committee on Honorary Degrees and Ceremonial advising that two candidates have been interviewed for the position of University Marshal and recommending that Mr. Noel Veitch be appointed.

It was agreed that Mr. Veitch be appointed to the position effective immediately for a period of three years with renewal at the pleasure of Senate.

63. *Report of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies

It was agreed by separate motion where necessary, that the report of the Executive Committee be approved as follows:

63.1 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

The following courses will be deleted from future calendars as indicated below:

1998/1999 Calendar

Engineering 5901

Engineering 5912

Engineering 5923

1999/2000 Calendar

Engineering 6853

Engineering 6863

Engineering 6924

Engineering 6932

Engineering 6971

Engineering 7421

Engineering 7910

Engineering 7924

Engineering 7933

Engineering 7941

Engineering 7942

Engineering 7961

Engineering 7991

2000/2001 Calendar

Engineering 8901

Engineering 8931

Engineering 8932

Engineering 8933

Engineering 8951

Engineering 8955

Engineering 8962

Engineering 8981

Engineering 8991

Page 319, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Programme of Study add the following to the fifth paragraph:

"and consists of a minimum of 21 credit hours."

Following the heading Programme of Study delete the 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th paragraphs. (i.e. "All students registering for the course...or the end of Work Term 2.)

Following the heading Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, sub-heading Engineering delete the second paragraph.

Delete the section "Forestry" in its entirety.

Page 333-335, delete the section "Forestry" in its entirety.

Page 323, following the heading Work Terms delete the second and third paragraphs.

Page 321, following the heading Admission Modes amend the third paragraph to read as follows:

"Entry from within the University: students registered in other programmes within, or other campuses of, the University may apply for entry into second year Engineering (Term 1). Such entry is normally based upon the same criteria as promotion from first year Engineering into second year (see section 5) under Examinations and Promotions, except that a third course chosen from one of the departments listed in section 5.c under Examinations and Promotions may be substituted for Engineering 1000; students will be required to make up Engineering 1000 in Term 1."

Page 322, following the heading Examinations and Promotions amend Clause 5) a) by inserting the following after "English 1080":

"(or equivalent)".

Amend Clause 5) c) by deleting the word "three" and replacing with "six" and insert the following at the end of the sentence:

"Students who have completed only three credit hours may be admitted to the programme in which case they will be required to obtain three more credit hours prior to graduation."

Relabel current e) as d) and amend to read as follows:

"d) The student must obtain an average of 65% in the set of courses comprising of Chemistry 1001, Physics 1021 and Mathematics 1001, English 1080 and either Engineering 1000 or three credit hours of the six credit hours specified in (c)."

Relabel f) as e) and amend as follows:

"e) The student must obtain at least 60% in each of Chemistry 1001, Physics 1021 and Mathematics 1001."

Amend course description for Engineering 2502 to read as follows:

"2502. Engineering Design II. Graphics II: Brief review of third angle orthographic projections of solid objects. Dimensioning and tolerancing. Working drawings, sections, details and assembly drawings, pictorial drawings.

Synthesis: The development of a systematic approach to problem solving. Topics include design criteria, solution generation, solution evaluation, feasibility analysis, effective communication - the written report and oral presentations of reports. Topics will be illustrated by case studies and through specially selected design projects."

Page 330, immediately following the heading Term 8 Courses insert the following note:

"NOTE: With sufficient justification, students may be permitted to substitute for one of the listed term 8 technical electives an appropriate course from another discipline or another academic unit within the University. Such a substitution requires the permission of the discipline chair who will normally consider whether the substitution is consistent with the student's programme and career objectives as well as whether the substituted course is suitable for a final year engineering student. In such cases it is the students' responsibility to make sure they are qualified and to register for the proposed course."

Page 324, delete the note immediately following the heading Term 2 Courses.

Delete the course numbers, titles and descriptions for Engineering 2121, 2132, 3312, 3351, 4100 and 7641.

Page 325, delete the note immediately following the heading Term 3 Courses.

Delete the course numbers, titles, and descriptions for Engineering 2421, 3052, 3102, 3411, 4011, 5061, 5132 and 5141.

Amend course description for Engineering 5101 to read as follows:

"5101. The Engineering Profession. Origins and development of Engineering as a profession and an examination of its values. The place of technology in society and the nature of technological decisions."

Delete course number, title and course description for Engineering 1502.

New Course

1503. Engineering Design I. Graphics I: A course in the development of spatial reasoning and effective graphic communication skills. Third angle orthographic projections of points, lines and planes in space with progression from this to solid objects including the use of auxiliary planes for complete description. Basic descriptive geometry. Intersections and development. Tools will be used but free hand sketching will be emphasized.

Computer Graphics: This component of the course introduces the use of a computer aided design package for the construction of three dimensional, wire-frame, models of engineering objects. These models are used for creating all the necessary projections for the production of engineering drawings. The engineering graphics principles, sketching, and visualization skills developed in the graphics portion of the course are employed and reinforced.

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 3841 and replace with the following:

"3844. Basic Electrical Components and Systems. (Non-Electrical Engineering Students) Introduction to electrical engineering; review of circuit concepts and analysis; operational amplifiers; filters; analog electronics and instrumentation; transducers; basics of rotating machinery and transformers; models, characteristics and applications of dc motors, induction motors, synchronous motors and transformers; introduction to motor control; plant power system; electrical safety."

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 4321 and replace with the following:

"4322. Thermal Sciences. Fundamental concepts associated with thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and heat transfer; first and second laws of thermodynamics; system and control volume analysis; classification of flows; introduction to boundary layers and drag; convection, conduction and radiation heat transfer; thermal insulation and calculation of R-values; cooling of electrical components."

New Courses

3423. Probability and Statistics. Probability; probability distributions; probability densities; sampling distribution; hypothesis testing; regression and correlation.

4423. Numerical Methods for Electrical Engineers. Introduction to numerical methods including analysis of errors; interpolation; solution of linear systems of equations; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; solution of nonlinear equations; optimization methods; numerical differentiation and integration; solution of ordinary differential equations; random number generators; introduction to simulation methods. Relevant computer laboratory exercises.

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 4707 and replace with the following:

"4708. Design of Civil Engineering Systems. Introduction to civil engineering systems, optimization in design, risk and decision analysis, and measurements; risk management, uncertainty associated with competition, optimizing using mathematical programming; introduction to dynamic programming and network analysis; applications of systems techniques to various sub-disciplines of civil engineering."

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 4702 and replace with the following:

"4703. Surveying and Geomatics. Plane surveying: distance, elevation, and angle measurements; horizontal and vertical curves; plane survey calculations; area and volume computations. Photogrammetry: sensors and platforms, mathematics of photogrammetry; instruments and equipment, photogrammetric products, digital photogrammetry, remote sensing, and introduction to global positioning and geographical information systems (GIS). Relevant laboratory and field exercises."

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 7738.

New Course

8748. Project Planning and Control. Introduction to types of contracts, project delivery approaches, and prevailing contractual relationships; basic project management techniques for network planning and scheduling (CPM and PERT); principles of resource productivity databases, preliminary estimating, and detailed bid preparation; quantitative approaches for effective control of time, cost, resource, quality, and value of constructed facilities; use of computer software for scheduling, estimating, and control.

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 8737.

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 3931.

New Courses

3901. Thermodynamics I. Macroscopic approach to heat, work, and energy; properties of pure substances; conservation of mass; conservation of energy for open and closed systems; thermal efficiency and coefficients of performance; the second law of thermodynamics and its corollaries; entropy; second law analysis of thermodynamic systems; second law efficiency. Relevant laboratory exercises.

3933. Mechanisms and Machines. Overview of mechanisms within machines; graphical and matrix methods for analysis of moving mechanisms; kinematics and kinetics of planar mechanisms; dynamic formulations:

Newton-Euler and Lagrangian; loads on mechanisms; synthesis of mechanisms. Synthesis project. Relevant laboratory exercises.

Revise calendar description for Engineering 4422 to read as follows:

"4422. Introduction to Numerical Methods. Errors; numerical stability; solution of linear and nonlinear equations and systems; introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors; function and data approximations; numerical differentiation and integration of functions; numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. Relevant computer laboratory exercises."

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 4321, 4342 and 4922.

New Course

4901. Thermodynamics II. Thermodynamic cycles: power and refrigeration applications; human comfort and air conditioning: mixture of gases and vapours, humidity, psychometrics; chemically reacting mixtures; combustion. Relevant laboratory exercises.

4913. Fluid Mechanics I. Fluid statics; fluid flow phenomena; control volume analysis of fluid motion; conservation of mass, momentum and energy; Bernoulli equation; head losses. Applications of conservation laws: flow measurement devices; pipe networks; momentum devices; dimensional analysis. Boundary layer phenomena. Lift and drag. Relevant laboratory exercises.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Engineering 5713 and Engineering 4913.

4933. Electro-mechanical Systems. Review of motors and sensors; hydraulics and pneumatics; basics of automatic control: control system simulation; digital electronics; computer based controllers; programmable miniature controllers; direct digital controllers; programmable logic controllers. Case studies. Synthesis project. Relevant laboratory exercises.

Amend course description for Engineering 5312 to read as follows:

"5312. Mechanics of Solids II. Failure theories for ductile and brittle materials; statically determinate and indeterminate beams; elastic bending of beams; impact loads; stability of columns with centric and eccentric loads; plastic bending of beams; plastic hinges. Relevant laboratory exercises."

Page 327, following the title of Engineering 5432 delete the words "Mechanical and Naval Architectural".

New Course

5435. Advanced Calculus. Overview of vector calculus; Gauss's theorem; Stokes' theorem; Green's theorem. Partial differential equations for mechanical systems: classification and solution. Calculus of variations: functionals for mechanical systems; Lagrangian formulation of dynamics.

New Course

5913. Fluid Mechanics II. Differential analysis of fluid motion; conservation of mass: continuity equation; conservation of momentum: Navier-Stokes equations; conservation of energy; inviscid incompressible flows; low Reynolds number flows; boundary layer flows; compressible flows. Relevant laboratory exercises.

5926. Mechanical Component Design I. Review of loads and stresses; design of springs, power screws, threaded fasteners, clutches, brakes, belt drives, spur gears, and gear trains. Synthesis project. Relevant laboratory exercises.

5932. Mechanical Vibrations. Free and forced vibrations of single and multi-degree of freedom systems; response to periodic and non-periodic excitations; vibration isolation and control; vibration measurement. Relevant laboratory exercises.

Page 326, following the heading Term 5 Courses delete the note and replace with the following:

"NOTE: All students take an approved Complementary Studies elective in Term 5. The elective is chosen from a list provided by the Office of the Associate Dean."

Amend course description for Engineering 6901 to read as follows:

"6901. Heat Transfer I. Introduction to the three modes of heat transfer. Steady-state, one-dimensional heat conduction: thermal resistance; thermal sources and sinks; fins; contact resistance. Steady-state, multi-dimensional heat conduction: shape factors. Unsteady-state heat conduction: lumped capacity analysis; Heisler charts. Radiation heat transfer: physical mechanism; radiation circuits and shields. Convection heat transfer: empirical correlations. Relevant laboratory exercises."

Amend course description for Engineering 6101 to read as follows:

"6101. Assessment of Technology. This course deals with the issues of the impact of technology on society from an economic, environmental and sociological point of view. Public safety as an engineering responsibility will also be covered. Students will be expected to participate in group discussions, write a number of essays and give oral presentations."

New Courses

6895. Software Design. Overview of software engineering; methods of modular decomposition, information hiding, planning for change, object-oriented design; software implementation; design for reuse; fail-safe and fail-stop design; design of distributed systems.

6925. Automatic Control Engineering. Background review; feedback concept; unit impulse response function; transfer functions; block diagrams; controllers; system stability: characteristic equations, Routh Hurwitz criteria, root locus plots, Nyquist plots, Bode plots; performance measures; performance adjustment: compensation; nonlinear phenomena: limit cycles, practical stability. Synthesis project. Relevant laboratory exercises.

6926. Mechanical Component Design II. Failure modes and mechanisms; stress concentrations; design of transmission shafts, bolted connections, welded joints, roller and hydrodynamic lubrication bearings. Codes and standards. Relevant laboratory exercises.

6941. Production Technology. Overview of production; production strategies; dimensioning and tolerancing; basic material removal processes; forming and shaping processes; casting, molding, extrusion and joining processes; computer aided machining; new technologies. Relevant laboratory exercises.

6972. Industrial Materials. Physical and mechanical properties; industrial materials: metals and metal alloys, ceramics and polymers, composite materials; failure modes and mechanisms; non-destructive testing and evaluation; damage tolerant materials; material treatments; materials selection. Relevant laboratory exercises.

7927. Advanced Dynamics and Stability. Dynamics formulations: Newton-Euler, Lagrangian, Hamiltonian; rigid body and flexible body dynamics; dynamics simulations; stability concepts: equilibrium states, bifurcations, limit cycles, strange attractors, chaos. Mechanical system instabilities: flutter, divergence, relaxation oscillations, oscillations due to vortex shedding, tube flow oscillations. Relevant laboratory exercises.

Amend course description for Engineering 7901 to read as follows:

"7901. Heat Transfer II. Numerical heat transfer. Fundamentals of convection heat transfer: thermal boundary layer; heat transfer coefficients; heat transfer in turbulent boundary layers. Empirical correlations for forced and natural convection heat transfer. Introduction to phase change heat transfer. Design of heat transfer devices and processes. Relevant laboratory exercises."

New Course

7943. Production and Operations Management. Overview of production and operations management; plant layout and process planning; process flow analysis and simulation; capacity planning and scheduling; inventory and resource management; manufacturing accounting principles; process costing; activity based costing. Relevant computer laboratory exercises.

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 7923.

New Courses

7962. Computer Aided Engineering. Advanced Computer Aided Design (CAD): parametric construction and assembly modelling, computer animation, finite element modelling applications; Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software for Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machine code generation; Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM) and reverse engineering for rapid prototyping applications; data exchange and data management. Relevant laboratory exercises.

7934. Finite Element Analysis. Basis of the finite element method. Continuum mechanics applications: beam problems; fluid mechanics problems; heat transfer problems. Relevant computer laboratory exercises.

7936. Mechanical Project I. In industry the development of a mechanical device or process is generally a team effort. In Terms 7 and 8 mechanical students organized into small teams must complete a development project. Each team must work on a different project. The system must be constructed and undergo performance trials and will be judged on its own merit. In this course each team will do a conceptual design and a rough technical design. In the next term each team will complete the technical design and then, construct and test the system. In each term there will also be a series of lectures on topics such as risk assessment and environmental and safety issues.

7944. Robotics and Automation. Industrial robot arms: direct and inverse kinematics, kinetics, singular configurations, dynamics formulations, motion and load control, trajectory planning; setup and programming of automation equipment; introduction to machine vision: hardware and software; industrial applications. Relevant laboratory exercises.

Insert the following course:

"8879. Digital Communications. Baseband digital transmission; intersymbol interference (ISI), partial response signalling, maximum likelihood receiver, matched filter, correlation receiver and error probability performance; source coding; the concept of information; entropy, Huffman code; linear predictive coding; channel coding; block codes, convolutional codes; modulation and coding trade-offs; bandwidth and power efficiency, spread spectrum techniques."

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 8922.

New Courses

8902. Mechanical Systems and Equipment. Overview of mechanical system design; equipment performance characteristics: pipe networks, pumps, fans, compressors, heat exchangers, fired heaters, cooling towers, pressure vessels, storage tanks; equipment selection for overall system design; system optimization and performance evaluation. Design case studies. Relevant laboratory exercises.

8935. Pressure Component Design. Traditional design methods; load types: sustained, cyclic, impact; failure modes and mechanisms; incremental collapse; plastic shakedown; residual and thermal stresses; limit analysis: upper and lower bound approximations; damage tolerant design; rational design procedures; case studies: cylinders; plates; shells. Relevant laboratory exercises.

8943. Computer Integrated Manufacturing. Introduction to Computer Integrated Manufacturing; workcell communication networks and protocols; integrated data bases and shop floor data collection; design for manufacturability and concurrent engineering; integrated materials handling; emerging technologies. Relevant laboratory exercises.

8944. Quality Management and Control. Quality management systems: total quality management, organizing and planning for quality; quality measurement; design for quality; quality conformance: statistical process control (SPC), sampling techniques; quality standards (ISO 9000). Case studies. Relevant laboratory exercises.

8936. Mechanical Project II. The objective of this course is to complete the technical design of the team project initiated in Engineering 7936 and then, to construct and test the system. In each term there will also be a series of lectures on topics such as risk assessment and environmental and safety issues.

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 6032 and 6041.

New Course

6045. Marine Systems. Shafting system design; shafting system vibration analysis, study of exciting forces and moments, and balancing of reciprocating and rotating machinery; heat transfer and marine heat exchangers; incompressible fluid flow and piping system design and selection of appropriate pumping devices. Relevant laboratory exercises.

Amend course number and type of Engineering 8058 to read as follows:

"6058. Submersibles Design. Formulation of mission statement, understanding various design constraints and reviewing the historical developments of submersibles design. Study of the hydrostatics principles of floatation, stability and control of submersibles. Performing resistance and propulsion calculations. Study of maneuvering and control equations. Survey of different materials and their selection criteria. Design of pressure hulls. Structural design of submersibles. Study of various support systems. Relevant laboratory exercises."

New Course

6070. Geosciences Applied in Ocean Engineering. An introductory course related to the geology and geophysics of the seabed with application to engineering problems; marine sediment transport and depositional environments; physical properties of sediments correlated with their setting; remote sensing of sediments and their properties (acoustics, geophysics); direct sampling of sediments; natural hazards in the marine setting - earthquakes (turbidity currents, tsunami, liquefaction), shallow gas, gas hydrates, case histories of engineering importance with reference to offshore Newfoundland (Grand Banks seismicity, well-site surveys, pipeline/cable corridors).

Delete course number, title and description for Engineering 7031, 7032, 7045, 7051 and 7879.

Amend number and type of Engineering 8005 to 7005.

New Course

7033. Marine Hydrodynamics. Fundamental equations of hydrodynamics, boundary layers; potential flow, added mass, damping, circulation, and vorticity; numerical methods for hydrodynamic coefficients; water waves and loading for regular and irregular seas.

7034. Dynamics and Hydroelasticity of Ocean Vehicles. Applications of the linearised equations of motion to problems with multiple degrees of freedom: the rigid body modes in conjunction with distortion modes. Introduction to hydroelastic analysis methods for ship and ocean structures: symmetric and antisymmetric response of the dry structure and of structures in still water and in waves; applications to real ship hulls; transient loading. Dynamics and control of marine vehicles: motions in calm water and in waves; hydrodynamics effects such as added mass, radiation and viscous damping; strip theory; random motions; and systems for course keeping and motion control.

7052. Ocean Systems Design. Preliminary design methods for the design of marine platforms and vehicles from mission statement to the selection of one or more acceptable solutions. Weight and cost estimating, power requirements estimating, and selection of principal design characteristics. Economic and operational evaluation of alternative solutions. Relevant design laboratory projects.

Amend course descriptions for Engineering 7801 and 7802 to read as follows:

"7801. Project Design Lab in Power and Control. Practical design of electrical and electronic components and equipment related to power and control engineering systems. This course includes a team project.

7802. Project Design Lab in Electronics and Instrumentation. Design of electronic and/or modular systems related to instrumentation and electronics engineering. This course includes a team project."

Amend number and type of Engineering 7021 to 8021.

Insert the following courses:

"7863. Operating Systems and File Organization. History, evolution, and philosophy of operating systems; process scheduling, synchronization and management; memory and device management; file systems and database systems; security and protection; communications and networking; distributed and real-time systems.

7877. Voice and Data Communications. Network topologies and architectures; International Standards Organization (ISO) Reference Model; queuing theory; performance modelling and analysis; digital switching and private branch exchanges (PBXs); local area networks (LANs); teletraffic engineering and the public toll network; packet switched networks: data link, network and transport layers; Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) and integrated voice and data communications."

Delete course numbers, titles, and descriptions for Engineering 8014, 8022, 8065 and 8876.

Delete current course description for Engineering 7893 and replace with the following:

"7893. Software Engineering. The process of software development; issues related to large-scale software projects; the goals of software engineering; life cycles; documentation; software project management; software specification and development from feasibility to maintenance; safety critical systems; tools; standards. This course includes a team project."

Page 311, amend the Chart of the Undergraduate Engineering Core Programme, Term 1 as follows:

Delete 1502 and replace with "1503".

Page 312-318, delete all charts and replace with the following:

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM :COMPUTER AND COMMUNICATIONS OPTION

CLASS OF 2001 AND LATER

ELECTRICAL CORE COMPUTER AND COMMUNICATIONS OPTION TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
FALL SPRING WINTER FALL SPRING WINTER TERM 7 TERM 8
TERM 3 TERM 4 TERM 5 TERM 6 TERM 7 TERM 8
3423 4102 COMPLEMENTARY 6101 7893 8800 7855 8874
PROBABILITY & ENGINEERING STUDIES ASSESSMENT SOFTWARE EE
STATISTICS ECONOMICS ELECTIVE OF TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING PROJECT
3821 4823 5824 6821 7863 8879 7813 8826
CIRCUIT SYSTEMS & SYSTEMS & CONTROL OPERATING SYS. DIGITAL
ANALYSIS SIGNALS I SIGNALS II SYSTEMS I &FILE ORGANIZ. COMMUNICATIONS
3206 4423 5842 6814 7877 TECHNICAL 7861 8821
CHEM. & PHY. NUMERICAL ELECTROMECH. ELECTROMAG. FOR VOICE & DATA ELECTIVE
ENG. MAT. IIE METHODS FOR EE DEVICES COMMUN. I COMMUNICATIONS
3891 4892 5891 6891 TECHNICAL TECHNICAL 7944 8864
ADVANCED DATA DESIGN & ANALYSIS FORMAL PROG. ELECTIVE ELECTIVE
PROGRAMMING STRUCTURES OF ALGORITHMS METHODS
3861 4862 5863 6895 TECHNICAL TECHNICAL COMPUTER

SCIENCE

ELECTIVE

8893
DIGITAL MICROPROCESSORS COMPUTER SOFTWARE ELECTIVE ELECTIVE
LOGIC ARCHITECTURE DESIGN
COMPLEMENTARY 4854 5854 6871 8801-8809

SPECIAL TOPICS IN

ELECTRICAL ENG'G

STUDIES ELECTIVE ELECTRONIC ANALOG COMMUNICATIONS
(Fast-track students only) DEVICES & CIRC. ELECTRONICS PRINCIPLES

NOTE: An Electrical Workshop course (480W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester , before term



CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM: CONSTRUCTION & STRUCTURAL OPTION

Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6 Term 7 Term 8 8
3610

EARTH

SCIENCES

4102

ENGR

ECONOMICS



C.S.
6101

ASSESS OF

TECHNOLOGY

7744

HIGHWAY

ENGINEERING

8700

C.E.

PROJECT

8706

STRUCT COMP

3205

MATERIALS

II

4312

MECHANICS

SOLIDS I

5312

MECHANICS OF

SOLIDS II

6705

STRUCTURAL

ANALYSIS I

7713

HYDROLOGY &

WATER RES

8739

CONT LAW

& LAB REL

8707

REHAB STRUCT

3844

ELECT COMP

& SYSTEMS

4322

THERMAL

SCIENCES

5723

GEOTECH

ENGR I

6723

GEOTECH

ENGR II

7717

APPLIED ENVIR

SCIENCE & ENGR

8705

STRUCTURAL

SYSTEMS

8751

COAST & OCEAN ENGR

3423

PROB &

STATS

4703

SURVEYING

GEOMATICS

5713

FLUID

MECHANICS

6713

HYDRAULICS

7706

STRUCTURAL

ANALYSIS II

8748

PROJ PLAN

& CONTROL

8723

GEOTECH III

3731

MATERIALS

OF CONSTR

4422

NUMERICAL

METHODS

5706

CONCRETE

STRUCTURES

6707

CONCR &

MASON STR

7704

DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES

T.E. 8744

TRANS ENGR

COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES ELECTIVE

(Fast Track Students Only)

4708

CIVIL ENGR

SYSTEMS

5434

APPLIED ANALYSIS

6739

CONSTR

PLAN





8790-8799

SPECIAL TOPICS



NOTES: A Surveying Field School (470W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester.

Computer-Aided Engineering seminars and workshops will be held in each semester from 4 through 8.

CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM: ENVIRONMENTAL & MUNICIPAL OPTION

Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6 Term 7 Term 8 8
3610

EARTH

SCIENCES

4102

ENGR

ECONOMICS



C.S.
6101

ASSESS OF

TECHNOLOGY

7744

HIGHWAY

ENGINEERING

8700

C.E.

PROJECT

8748

PROJ PLAN

& CONTROL

3205

MATERIALS

II

4312

MECHANICS

SOLIDS I

5312

MECHANICS OF

SOLIDS

II

6705

STRUCTURAL

ANALYSIS I

7713

HYDROLOGY &

WATER RES

8739

CONT LAW

& LAB REL

8744

TRANS ENGR

3844

ELECT COMP

& SYSTEMS

4322

THERMAL

SCIENCES

5723

GEOTECH

ENGR I

6723

GEOTECH

ENGR II

7717

APPLIED ENVIR

SCIENCE & ENGR

8713

MUNICIPAL

ENGR

8751

COAST & OCEAN ENGR

3423

PROB &

STATS

4703

SURVEYING

GEOMATICS

5713

FLUID

MECHANICS

6713

HYDRAULICS

7718

ENVIRONMENTAL

GEOTECH

8717

ENVIRON

ASSM

8723

GEOTECH III

3731

MATERIALS

OF CONSTR

4422

NUMERICAL

METHODS

5706

CONCRETE

STRUCTURES

6707

CONCR &

MASON STR

7716

HYDROTECHNICAL

ENGR

T.E. 8790-8799

SPECIAL TOPICS

COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES ELECTIVE

(Fast Track Students Only)

4708

CIVIL ENGR

SYSTEMS

5434

APPLIED ANALYSIS

6739

CONSTR

PLAN



NOTES: A Surveying Field School (470W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester.

Computer-Aided Engineering seminars and workshops will be held in each semester from 4 through 8.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM : DESIGN OPTION (CLASS OF 2001 AND LATER)

TERM 3 TERM 4 TERM 5 TERM 6 TERM 7 TERM 8


3423

PROBABILITY

& STATISTICS

4102

ENGINEERING

ECONOMICS



COMPLEMENTARY

STUDIES

ELECTIVE



6101

ASSESSMENT

OF TECHNOLOGY



7936

MECHANICAL

PROJECT I



8936

MECHANICAL

PROJECT II



3844

BASIC ELECTRICAL

COMPONENTS & SYSTEMS



4312

MECHANICS

OF SOLIDS I



5312

MECHANICS

OF SOLIDS II



6901

HEAT

TRANSFER I



7901

HEAT

TRANSFER II



8935

PRESSURE

COMPONENT DESIGN



3205

CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS

OF ENGINEERING

MATERIALS II



4422

INTRODUCTION TO

NUMERICAL METHODS



5435

ADVANCED

CALCULUS



6925

AUTOMATIC CONTROL

ENGINEERING



7927

ADVANCED

DYNAMICS &

STABILITY



8902

MECHANICAL

SYSTEMS

& EQUIPMENT



3901

THERMODYNAMICS I



4901

THERMODYNAMICS II



5926

MECHANICAL COMPONENT

DESIGN I



6926

MECHANICAL COMPONENT

DESIGN II



7934

FINITE ELEMENT

ANALYSIS



TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE



3933

MECHANISMS

& MACHINES



4913

FLUID

MECHANICS I



5913

FLUID

MECHANICS II



6941

PRODUCTION

TECHNOLOGY



7962

COMPUTER AIDED

ENGINEERING



TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE



COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES

ELECTIVE

FAST TRACK ONLY



4933

ELECTRO/MECHANICAL

SYSTEMS



5932

MECHANICAL

VIBRATIONS



6972

INDUSTRIAL

MATERIALS





NOTE: The first term 8 of the new program occurs in 2001. Technical electives for it are under development.

NOTE : A Mechanical Workshop (290W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester.

CHART OF THE OCEAN AND NAVAL ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

Class of 2001
Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6 Term 7 Term 8 Term 8
3054

Ocean Eng Hydrostatics

4061

Mar Prod & Eng Mang

C.S. 6002

Ship Hull Strength

7002

Ship Struc

Ana & Design

8000

Design Project

8021

Prop Efficiency

3205

Chem & Phys of Materials

4102

Engineering Economics

5011

Res & Prop

6045

Mar Eng

Systems

7005

Float Ocean Struct Design

8054

Advanced Marine Vehicles

8048

Maint of Eng Systems

3423

Probability and Statistics

4312

Mech of

Solids I

5312

Mech of Solids II

6058

Submersibles

Design

7033

Marine Hydrodynamics

Phys 3300

Intr to Physical

Oceanog

8062

Mar Prod

Management

3844

Basic Electrical Comp & Sys

4422

Int Numerical Methods

5435

Advanced Calculus

6070

Geo App in

Ocean Eng

7034

Dyn & Hydro

of Ocean Veh

T.E. 8090

Sp Topics

in Mar Hyd

3901

Thermo I

4901

Thermo II

5926

Mech Component

Design I

6101

Ass Tech

7052

Ocean Systems Design

T.E. 8091

Sp Topics

in Struct

Comp Studies Elective

(Fast Track Students Only)

4913

Fluid Mechanics I

5932

Mech Vibrations

6925

Auto Control

Eng

8092

Sp Topics

in Mar Eng

Note: A workshop course (290W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester.



CHART OF THE OCEAN AND NAVAL ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

Classes of 1998, 1999 and 2000

Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6 Term 7 Term 8 Term 8
3054

Ocean Eng Hydrostatics

4061

Mar Prod & Eng Mang

C.S.

Elective

6002

Ship Hull Strength

7002

Ship Struc

Ana & Design

8000

Design Project

8021

Prop Efficiency

3205

Chem & Phys of Eng Materials II

4102

Engineering Economics

5011

Res & Prop

6932

Vibrations

7005

Float Ocean

Struct Design

8054

Advanced Marine Vehicles

8048

Maintenance of Eng Systems

3411

Appl Diff

Equations

4312

Mech of

Solids I

5432

Advanced Calculus

6045

Mar Eng

Systems

7033

Marine Hydrodynamics

Phys 3300

Intr to Physical

Oceanog

8062

Marine Prod

Management

3312

Mechanics III

4422

Numerical Methods

5312

Mech of Solids II

6101

Ass Tech

7034

Dyn & Hydro

of Ocean Veh

T. E. 8090

Special Topics

in Mar Hyd

3841

Elect/Mech

Conversion

4321

Thermo I

5713

Fluid Mechanics

6853

Elec for Non EE

7052

Ocean Systems Design

T. E. 8091

Special Topics

in Struct

3102

KVAT

4922

Mechanical Design

5901

Thermo II

6971

Physical Metallurgy

8092

Special Topics

in Mar Eng

Note: A workshop course (290W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM : MANUFACTURING OPTION

(CLASS OF 2001 AND LATER)

TERM 3 TERM 4 TERM 5 TERM 6 TERM 7 TERM 8


3423

PROBABILITY

& STATISTICS

4102

ENGINEERING

ECONOMICS



COMPLEMENTARY

STUDIES

ELECTIVE



6101

ASSESSMENT

OF TECHNOLOGY



7936

MECHANICAL

PROJECT I



8936

MECHANICAL

PROJECT II



3844

BASIC ELECTRICAL

COMPONENTS & SYSTEMS



4312

MECHANICS

OF SOLIDS I



5312

MECHANICS

OF SOLIDS II



6901

HEAT

TRANSFER I



7943

PRODUCTION &

OPERATIONS

MANAGEMENT



8943

COMPUTER INTEGRATED

MANUFACTURING



3205

CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS

OF ENGINEERING

MATERIALS II



4422

INTRODUCTION TO

NUMERICAL METHODS



5435

ADVANCED

CALCULUS



6925

AUTOMATIC CONTROL

ENGINEERING



7944

ROBOTICS &

AUTOMATION



8944

QUALITY

MANAGEMENT

& CONTROL



3901

THERMODYNAMICS I



4901

THERMODYNAMICS II



5926

MECHANICAL COMPONENT

DESIGN I



6926

MECHANICAL COMPONENT

DESIGN II



7934

FINITE ELEMENT

ANALYSIS



TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE



3933

MECHANISMS

& MACHINES



4913

FLUID

MECHANICS I



5913

FLUID

MECHANICS II



6941

PRODUCTION

TECHNOLOGY



7962

COMPUTER AIDED

ENGINEERING



TECHNICAL

ELECTIVE



COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES

ELECTIVE

FAST TRACK ONLY



4933

ELECTRO/MECHANICAL

SYSTEMS



5932

MECHANICAL

VIBRATIONS



6972

INDUSTRIAL

MATERIALS

NOTE: The first term 8 of the new program occurs in 2001. Technical electives for it are under development.

NOTE : A Mechanical Workshop (290W) is held on campus prior to the start of the Spring Semester.

Fall Term Winter Term
1405 Engineering

Mathematics I

2422 Engineering

Mathematics II

3423 Probability

and Statistics

2205 Chem & Phy.

of Eng. Mat. I

1080 English 2313 Mechanics II
Complementary

Studies

2420 Structured

Programming



63.2 School of Nursing

Page 281, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading General Regulations for the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme delete "...School of Nursing operated by the Health Care Corporation of St. John's and Western Memorial Regional Hospital School of Nursing." from the first paragraph and replace with the following:

"...the Centre for Nursing Studies and Western Regional School of Nursing.".

Page 283, following the heading Programme Requirements, sub-heading Other Credit Hours (18) delete Clauses b) and c) and replace with the following:

"b) Biochemistry 1430

c) Biology 3053".

Following the heading General Regulations for the Bachelor of Nursing Degree, sub-heading Admission to the School of Nursing amend Clause 2 by deleting "April 1" and replacing with the following:

"March 1".

Page 284, following the heading Programme of Studies: Bachelor of Nursing delete the "Admission" section in its entirety.

Following the heading Programme of Studies: Bachelor of Nursing sub-heading Admission Requirements add the following:

"A student who has not taken a course in the Bachelor of Nursing (Post-RN) programme within 6 semesters will be withdrawn from the programme so that other applicants may be accommodated."

Page 285, following the sub-heading Science Requirements delete "Biology 3051" in the first sentence and replace with the following:

"Biology 3053".

Delete "Biology 3051" from Note b) and replace with the following:

"Biology 3053".

Following the sub-heading Nursing Credit Hours (42) add new Clause e) to read as follows:

"e) Primary Health Care N4750 and N4751".

Following the sub-heading Science Requirements add new clause d) to the note:

"d) A 1000 level science course can be used to satisfy the admission requirement for the programme and can be used later as one of the six required electives."

Page 286-290, following the heading Course List amend the prerequisite note for Nursing N1011 to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: N1001 or the former N2010 or N2400

Prerequisites or Corequisites: Psychology 1000, N1003 or the former N3021."

Amend the prerequisite note for Nursing N1012 to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: N1002 or the former N2101 or N2300."

Following the course description N1520 add the following:

"Corequisite or Prerequisite: N1011, N1511, N1012 or the former N2102 or N2301, N1014 or the former N2040."

Following the course description for Nursing N2003 amend the prerequisite and corequisite notes to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: N1012 or the former N2102 or N2301, Biochemistry 1430 or the former Biochemistry 2430

Corequisite: Biology 3053."

Following the course description for Nursing N2004 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: Biochemistry 1430 or the former Biochemistry 2430, N1012 or the former N2102, or N2301."

Following the course description for Nursing N2011 amend the prerequisites/

corequisites note to read as follows:

"Corequisites/Prerequisites: N2003 or the former N2250 or N3010/N3310, N2004 or the former N2250."

Following the course description for Nursing N2013 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: N1001 or the former N2010 or N2400."

Delete the corequisite note for Nursing N2040 and add the following prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: Must be a Registered Nurse or eligible for registration."

Following the course description for N2040 amend the note to read as follows:

"Note: Credit may not be obtained for both N2040 and either N1014 or the former N2830."

Following the course description for N2230 delete the last sentence and add the following prerequisite note:

"Prerequisite: Must be a Registered Nurse or eligible for registration."

Following the course description for N2990 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisite(s): N2010 or N1001, N2040 or N1014 for Generic students; none for Post-RN's."

Following course description for N3023 add the following note:

"Note: Credit may not be obtained for both N3022 and N3023."

Following course descriptions for N4010, N4710, N4720, N4730 and N4740 insert the following after "N3022" in the prerequisite note:

"or N3023".

Following the course description for N3520, N3521, N3522 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: N3001/N3501 or N4321/N4322, N3113 or N5000."

Following the course description for N4010 delete the word "Laboratory" and replace with the following:

"Laboratory/Seminar:".

Following the course description for N4110 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: N4501 or N4310, N4104 or N4002 or N4202 or N4600, N4103 or N5220."

Following the course description for N4512 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: N4101 or N4010, N4501 or N4310."

Following the course description for N4513 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: N4101 or N4010, N4501 or N4310

Approval from the Undergraduate Studies Committee."

Following the course description for N4740 delete the following from the prerequisite note:

"N3200".

Following the course description for N4742 delete the following from the corequisite note:

"and N4741".

Following the course description for N4750 and N4751 add the following to the prerequisite note:

", N5210".

Following the course description for N5210 add the following to the prerequisite note:

"or admission to the BN (Post-RN) Programme"

Following the course description for N5220 add the following to the prerequisite note:

"or admission to the BN (Post-RN) Programme".

Page 291, following the heading Suggested Sequencing of Courses, delete Biochemistry 2430 and replace with "Biochemistry 1430" and delete Introduction to Microbiology and replace with "Biology 3053".

63.3 Sir Wilfred Grenfell College - Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) Programme

Page 96, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) delete the first paragraph and replace with the following:

"The Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) is a programme designed to educate and train the student in the history, theory and practice of the theatre arts. The degree will provide an undergraduate training, delivered by theatre professionals, that will prepare students to enter a professional graduate school of theatre, theatre conservatory or an apprenticeship in the theatre profession. The degree also provides a broad liberal arts education with a strong component of dramatic literature, enabling the graduate to pursue a variety of careers outside the theatre profession."

Following the heading Academic Performance amend Clauses 1, 4, 5 and 6 to read as follows:

"1. Attendance and participation at all studio courses and production rehearsals is vital to the collaborative nature of the programme of study in theatre. Absence from classes or rehearsals of any one student could jeopardize a production, the proper dissemination of practical skills and the overall safety of the students. Therefore attendance at all studio classes, rehearsals and crew calls will be compulsory.

4. A candidate whose average in the theatre courses for the BFA degree falls below 65 percent in any semester will be placed on probation within the programme.

5 A candidate will be required to withdraw from the programme if:

the candidate's average in Theatre courses falls below 65 percent in each of two consecutive semesters of his/her enrollment in the programme.

6. Candidates who have withdrawn or who have been required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) programme and wish to re-enter the programme must re-apply in competition after a lapse of two semesters by April 30 for the upcoming Fall semester, or by August 30 for the upcoming Winter semester."

Following the heading Degree Regulations delete this section in its entirety and replace with the following:

"DEGREE REGULATIONS

To be awarded the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) a student shall successfully complete one hundred and forty credit hours (forty courses) which would normally be completed over a four-year period. These one hundred and forty credit hours shall be chosen in accordance with the following pattern:

1. Six credit hours in English (English 1000 and 1001 or equivalent)

2. Six credit hours in the History of Art (Visual Arts 2700 and 2701)

3. Eighteen credit hours in dramatic literature in the following configuration: two semesters of a survey of major dramatic texts (English 2350 and 2351); two semesters of Shakespeare (English 3200 and 3201); two semesters of modern and contemporary drama (English 3275 and 4305).

4. Fifteen credit hours in academic elective courses chosen in consultation with the Chair of the Theatre Programme.

5. Ninety-five credit hours in courses in Theatre studies chosen from one of two areas; Acting or Stagecraft, including those courses common to both areas.

Notes:

1). Where circumstances warrant any prerequisite(s) for Theatre courses may be waived by the Head of the Division of Fine Arts.

2). Students in their first year will not be allowed to participate in theatre productions. Exceptions will be made only with the permission of the Head of the Division of Fine Arts, and permission will be given only where a student demonstrates satisfactory performance.

3). Where circumstances warrant, a student in second or third year may be given the opportunity for advanced responsibilities in production with the permission of the Head of the Division of Fine Arts. Permission will be given only where a student demonstrates above average academic performance as well as exceptional theatrical ability.

4). Productions will constitute the designated number of rehearsal hours as described below. However, the final week of rehearsals (technical rehearsals) will include ten hour days on Saturday and Sunday. All performances will take place in the evenings with the possible exceptions of occasional matinees.

5). Any departmental regulations may be waived upon request of the Head of the Division of Fine Arts by the appropriate committee on Undergraduate Studies.

6). Students entering the programme under Calendar Regulations prior to 1997 will be allowed to substitute History 1000/1001 (or equivalent) and one academic elective course in lieu of Theatre 1110 or Theatre 1120, Theatre 2080 or Theatre 2090 and Theatre 2081 or Theatre 2091."

Page 97, amend the paragraph immediately following the heading Outline of Major Programmes to read as follows:

"Students will major in one of two areas in Theatre Studies: acting or stagecraft/design. The major comprises ninety-five credit hours chosen in accordance with the following pattern: The introductory Theatre courses Theatre 1000, 1001, 1010, 1020 and the fourth year courses 4030, 4040, 4050 and 4051 are common to both major options.

Students choosing Acting as a major will complete Theatre 1110, 2010, 2011, 2080, 2081, 3010, 3011, 3070, 3071, 3080, 3081, 4010, 4011, 4070, 4071, 4080 and 4081 in addition to the twenty-seven credit hours (eight courses) common to both majors.

Students choosing Stagecraft/Design as a major will complete Theatre 1120, 2020, 2021, 2090, 2091, 3020, 3021, 3060, 3061, 3090, 3091, 4020, 4021, 4060, 4061, 4090 and 4091 in addition to the twenty-seven credit hours (eight courses) common to both majors."

Insert the following immediately before the heading Course Structure for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre:

"TABLE OF CREDIT RESTRICTIONS FOR PRESENT THEATRE COURSES WITH FORMER THEATRE COURSES

Present Course Former Course

Theatre 1000/1001 Theatre 1000/1001

(Introduction to Theatre History) (Introduction to Theatre)

Theatre 2010/2011 (Acting II) Theatre 201A/B

Theatre 2020/2021 (Stagecraft II) Theatre 202A/B

Theatre 3010/3011 (Acting III) Theatre 301A/B

Theatre 3020/3021 (Stagecraft III) Theatre 302A/B

Theatre 3060 (Stagecraft Master Class I) Theatre 3070

Theatre 3061 (Stagecraft Master Class II) Theatre 3071

Theatre 3070 (Acting Master Class I) Theatre 3070

Theatre 3071 (Acting Master Class II) Theatre 3071

Theatre 4010/4011 (Acting IV) Theatre 401A/B

Theatre 4020/4021 (Stagecraft IV) Theatre 402A/B

Theatre 4060 (Stagecraft Master Class III) Theatre 4070

Theatre 4061 (Stagecraft Master Class IV) Theatre 4071

Theatre 4070 (Acting Master Class III) Theatre 4070

Theatre 4071 (Acting Master Class IV) Theatre 4071

Theatre 4080/4081 (Production-Acting) Theatre 4080/4081

Theatre 4090/4091 (Production-Stagecraft) Theatre 4080/4081

Theatre 4030 (Theory of Directing and Design) Theatre 4030 (Design)

Theatre 4040 (Directed Studies) Theatre 4040 (Directing)

Theatre 4050 (Special Topics in Theatre History) Theatre 4050 (History)

Theatre 4051 (Dramatic Theory and Criticism) Theatre 4060 (Theory)".

Following the heading Course Structures for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre amend the section to read as follows:

"1st. Year

Fall

- Theatre 1000 (Introduction to Theatre History I)

- Theatre 1010 (Introduction to Acting)

- Theatre 1020 (Introduction to Stagecraft)

- English 1000/1050

- Elective

Winter

- Theatre 1001 (Introduction to Theatre History II)

- Theatre 1110 (Acting I) or Theatre 1120 (Stagecraft I)

- English 1001/1051

- Elective

- Elective

2nd. Year

Fall

- Theatre 2010 (Acting II) or Theatre 2020 (Stagecraft II)

- Theatre 2080 (Production-Acting) or Theatre 2090 (Production-Stagecraft)

- English 2350 (Drama)

- English 3200 (Drama)

- Elective

Winter

- Theatre 2011 (Acting II) or Theatre 2021 (Stagecraft II)

- Theatre 2081 (Production-Acting) or Theatre 2091 (Production-Stagecraft)

- English 2351 (Drama)

- English 3201 (Drama)

- Elective

3rd. Year

Fall

- Theatre 3010 (Acting III) or 3020 (Stagecraft III)

- Theatre 3060 (Stagecraft) or Theatre 3070 (Acting) - Master Class I

- Theatre 3080 (Production-Acting) or Theatre 3090 (Production-Stagecraft)

- English 3275 (Drama)

- Visual Arts 2700 (Art History Survey I)

Winter

- Theatre 3011 (Acting III) or 3021 (Stagecraft III)

- Theatre 3061 (Stagecraft) or Theatre 3071 (Acting) - Master Class II

- Theatre 3081 (Production-Acting) or Theatre 3091 (Production-Stagecraft)

- English 4305 (Drama)

- Visual Arts 2701 (Art History Survey II)

4th. Year

Fall

- Theatre 4010 (Acting IV) or Theatre 4020 (Stagecraft IV)

- Theatre 4060 (Stagecraft) or Theatre 4070 (Acting) - Master Class III

- Theatre 4080 (Production-Acting) or Theatre 4090 (Production-Stagecraft)

- Theatre 4040 (Directed Studies)

- Theatre 4030 (Theory of Directing and Design)

Winter

- Theatre 4011 (Acting IV) or Theatre 4021 (Stagecraft IV)

- Theatre 4061 (Stagecraft) or Theatre 4071 (Acting) - Master Class IV

- Theatre 4081 (Production-Acting) or Theatre 4091 (Production-Stagecraft)

- Theatre 4050 (Special Topics in Theatre History)

- Theatre 4051 (Dramatic Theory and Criticism)".

Following the heading Course Descriptions amend the following courses to read as follows:

"Theatre 1000 and 1001. Introduction to the History of Theatre I and II. A historical survey of the art of the theatre. The history of theatre will be studied in terms of the evolution of performance and of the physical theatre from their origins in a variety of social rituals and contexts through to their present plurality of forms. At the same time, the nature and function of the various components of theatrical performance (acting, directing, design, etc.) will be analyzed in terms of period philosophical, social, cultural, political and religious contexts. These courses are open to non-theatre students.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Theatre 1010. Introduction to Acting. An appreciation of the fundamentals of the craft of acting. Basic exercises in voice, movement, relaxation and concentration, improvisation and script analysis will introduce the student to the imaginative and physical skills required by an actor. This is a basic course for all theatre students regardless of their specific areas of interest. This course is open to non-theatre students.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Theatre 1020. Introduction to Stagecraft. An appreciation of the basic vocabulary and techniques of the various technical and organizational structures and practices of staging plays. Areas of concentration will include scenic and costume construction, basics in lighting, painting, props, sound and stage management. This is a basic course for all theatre students regardless of their specific areas of interest. This course is open to non-theatre students.

Studio: Six hours per week."

Theatre 2010 and 2011. (Same as former 201A/B) Acting II. Second level courses for acting majors. Emphasis on speech, text analysis and scene study. Various techniques and texts will be employed to root the student in the fundamental process of acting. A beginning approach to understanding the body as an instrument and the techniques required to use the instrument. These courses are restricted to acting majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 1000 and 1001, Theatre 1010 and 1020, Theatre 1110. 2010 is a prerequisite for 2011.

Theatre 2020 and 2021. (Same as former 202A/B) Stagecraft II. Second level courses for the Stagecraft/Design major. Emphasis on the fundamentals of drafting, stage management, model-making, props building, 2D and 3D design and painting. These courses are restricted to stagecraft majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 1000 and 1001, Theatre 1010 and 1020, Theatre 1120. 2020 is a prerequisite to 2021.

Theatre 3010 and 3011. (Same as former 301A/B) Acting III. Intermediate level courses for the acting major. Continued emphasis on speech, voice production, text analysis, etc. Intermediate level scene study on material including non-realistic plays. These courses are restricted to acting majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 2010 and 2011, Theatre 2080 and 2081.

Theatre 3020 and 3021. (Same as former 302A/B) Stagecraft III. Intermediate course for stagecraft/design majors. Continued emphasis on carpentry, painting, lighting, sound, wardrobe, stage management, etc. Additional emphasis on set, costume and lighting design. These courses are restricted to stagecraft majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 2020 and 2021, Theatre 2090 and 2091.

Theatre 3060 and 3061. Master Classes I and II (Stagecraft). In each case a semester of work for stagecraft students with a guest artist in a particular area of specialization. These courses are restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 2020 and 2021. Theatre 3060 is a prerequisite for Theatre 3061.

Theatre 3070 and 3071. Master Classes I and II (Acting). In each case a semester of work for acting students with a guest artist in a particular area of specialization. These courses are restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 2010 and 2011. Theatre 3070 is a prerequisite for Theatre 3071.

Theatre 4010 and 4011. (Same as former 401A/B) Acting IV. Advanced courses for acting majors. Concentration on advanced scene study on texts illustrating period styles or other genres of plays. These courses will be directly related to performance work in Theatre 4080 and Theatre 4081. Restricted to acting majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3010 and 3011, Theatre 3080 and 3081.

Theatre 4020 and 4021. (Same as former 402A/B) Stagecraft IV. Advanced courses for stagecraft/design majors with individual concentration on specific technical or design skills. These courses will be directly related to production assignments in Theatre 4080 and 4081. Restricted to stagecraft majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3020 and 3021, Theatre 3090 and 3091.

Theatre 4050. Special Topics in Theatre History. A lecture/seminar course in selected areas of theatre history. Students will present seminars on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Where possible this course will be researched in the theatre libraries and museums of a major theatre center. Restricted to theatre majors.

Lecture/Seminar: Three hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3010 and 3011 or Theatre 3020 and 3021.

Theatre 4051. Dramatic Theory and Criticism. A study of major critical works in the theory of drama from Aristotle to Artaud and beyond. In addition this course will involve a critical analysis of contemporary theatre styles and practices. Where possible this course will be researched by attending theatre performances in a major theatre center. Restricted to theatre majors.

Lecture/Seminar: Three hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3010 and 3011 or Theatre 3020 and 3021.

Theatre 4060 and 4061. Master Classes III and IV (Stagecraft). In each case a semester of advanced work with a guest artist in a particular area of specialization. Restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3060 and 3061. Theatre 4060 is a prerequisite for Theatre 4061.

Theatre 4070 and 4071. Master Classes III and IV (Acting). In each case a semester of advanced work with a guest artist in a particular area of specialization. Restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3070 and 3071. Theatre 4070 is a prerequisite for Theatre 4071.

Theatre 4080 and 4081 (Production-Acting). In each case a semester of work on a major production in a significant and leading capacity (i.e. leading or principal role). Restricted to Theatre majors.

Studio: Twenty hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3010 and 3011, Theatre 3080 and 3081.

Theatre 4090 and 4091 (Production-Stagecraft). In each case a semester of work on a major production in a significant and leading capacity (i.e. designer, stage manager, technical director, etc.). Restricted to Theatre majors.

Studio: Twenty hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3020 and 3021, Theatre 3090 and 3091."

New Courses

Theatre 1110. Acting I. The introductory course for those majoring in acting. Emphasis on voice, speech, movement and text analysis. Various learning methods will be employed, from sensitivity exercises to improvisation and creative imagination exercises. Participation in in-class performance is required. This course is restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 1000 and 1001, Theatre 1010 and 1020.

Theatre 1120. Stagecraft I. The introductory course for those majoring in stagecraft. Emphasis on the fundamentals of scenic carpentry, wardrobe, sound, lighting, crewing, painting and stage management. Practical projects will be related to departmental productions. This course is restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 1000 and 1001, Theatre 1010 and 1020.

Theatre 2080 and 2081 (Production Acting). In each case a semester of work in one of the major productions, in a supporting capacity (i.e. a supporting role). These courses are restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Twelve hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 1110.

Theatre 2090 and 2091 (Production Stagecraft). In each case a semester of work in a major production in a supporting capacity (i.e. assistant stage manager, wardrobe assistant, etc.) These courses are restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Twelve hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 1120.

Theatre 3080 and 3081 (Production-Acting).In each case a semester of work on a major production in a significant capacity (i.e. a principal role) These courses are restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Sixteen hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 2010 and 2011, Theatre 2080 and 2081.

Theatre 3090 and 3091 (Production-Stagecraft). In each case a semester of work on a major production in a significant capacity (i.e. stage manager, crew chief, head of props, etc.). These courses are restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Sixteen hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 2020 and 2021, Theatre 2090 and 2091.

Theatre 4030. Theory of Directing and Design. An examination and analysis of the nature and practice of directing and design from a theoretical and aesthetical perspective. A lecture/seminar course involving script analysis to examine the interpretive and imagistic processes of directors and designers. This course is open to students in the Dramatic Literature concentration.

Lecture/Seminar: Three hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3010 and 3011 or Theatre 3020 and 3021 or 18 credit hours in Dramatic Literature courses.

Theatre 4040. Directed Studies. Student projects in playmaking, performance, directing, design or technical presentations supervised by faculty. In consultation with the faculty, the student will submit a proposal for a project on which he/she wishes to work. These projects will be presented in public. Restricted to theatre majors.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 3010 and 3011 or Theatre 3020 and 3021.

63.4 Sir Wilfred Grenfell College - Bachelor of Science (Specialization in Environmental Science) Degree Programme

New Courses

Environmental Science 1000. Introduction to Environmental Science. An introduction to the study of the environment. Environmental principles, issues and problems will be described and placed in a historical and societal context.

Environmental Science 2360. Geological Hazards and Natural Disasters. This course will introduce students to the geological aspects of the natural environment and the impacts that natural geological processes and phenomena may have on humanity. The impact of geological hazards and natural disasters on human society and behaviour will be examined through case studies.

Environmental Science 3072. Comparative Marine Environments. This course will investigate the physical chemical, geological and biological characteristics of the major marine environments-from the coastal zone to the abyss and from the equator to the poles. The objective of the course will be an integrated study of the parameters that define the various environments. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of organism and environment. The influence of the environment on the form, function and behaviour or organisms and the influence of the organism in modification of the physical environment will be stressed.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Environmental Science 2371

Environmental Science 3470. Transport Phenomena. Fundamentals of fluid flow. Conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy. Dimensional analysis. Turbulence. Confined fluid flows. Fundamentals of heat transfer. Conduction, convention, and radiation. Diffusion, dispersion, and osmosis. Applications to transport of pollutants at the microscopic and macroscopic scale.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1001. Physics 1020 and 1021 or 1050 and 1054.

Lectures: three hours per week.

Environmental Science 4069. Fundamentals of Soil Systems. The chemistry and biology of soil, including inorganic soil components, chemistry of soil organic matter, soil equilibria, sorption phenomena on soils, ion exchange processes, kinetics of soil processes, redox chemistry of soils, soil acidity, chemistry of saline and sodic soils, organic pollutants, trace and toxic elements in soils, soil organisms (microbial decomposers, micro and macro biota), organic matter cycling, nutrient cycling and fertility and productivity, soil conservation and sustainable agriculture.

Prerequisites: Biology 2600, Environmental Science 2261 (or with instructor approval, Chemistry 2401 or Chemistry 2400 or Chemistry 2300), with a minimum of eighty credit hours from the Environmental Science Programme.

Environmental Science 4131. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Effective ecosystem restoration and remediation involves an interdisciplinary approach. This course will discuss procedures aimed at restoring and rehabilitating ecosystems, with an examination of the scientific basis underlying these procedures. The efficacy of management options, e.g. biomanipulation, microbial degradation and chemical treatments, involved in restoration and waste management will be evaluated. Applications and practical case studies of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems will be covered.

Prerequisites: Biology 2600, Chemistry 1001, with a minimum of eighty credit hours from the Environmental Science programme.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Environmental Science 4479. Groundwater Flow. Groundwater in the hydrologic cycle. Principles of fluid flow through permeable media. Hydraulic properties of soil and rock formations. Groundwater at the local and regional scale. The unit basin model. Groundwater as a transport agent of chemicals and microbes. Groundwater resources, reservoir characterisation, and quality assessment. Groundwater contamination.

Prerequisite: Environmental Science 3470

Lectures: Three hours per week

Page 77, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Environmental Science Core, Section (a) insert the following:

"Mathematics 2550 or equivalent".

Delete "Environmental Science 4080 (Computer Based Scientific Writing)".

Following the heading Environmental Science Core, Section (b) delete "Physics 1200/1201 (or 1050/1054) and replace with the following:

"Physics 1020/1021 (or 1050/1054)".

Following the heading Environmental Science Core, Section (c) insert the following:

"Economics 2010 (Introduction to Microeconomics)

Environmental Studies 3000 (Environmental Economics)

Political Science 3550 (Politics and Environment)

Religious Studies 3880 (Spirituality and Environment)"

Following the heading Environmental Science Core, Section (d) insert the following:

"Environmental Science 2261

Environmental Science 2360

Environmental Science 3072

Environmental Science 3470"

Delete "Geography 2195 (Introduction to Maps)" and replace with the following:

"Environmental Studies 2000 or equivalent".

Following the heading Stream Requirements, sub-heading Biology stream (ESB), Section (a) insert the following:

"Environmental Science 3130, 4130 or Environmental Science 4131".

Page 77, following the heading Stream Requirements, sub-heading Biology stream (ESB), Section (b) delete "Physics 1200/1201 (or 1050/1054) and replace with the following:

"Physics 1020/1021 (or 1050/1054)".

Following the heading Chemistry stream (ESCh) delete first line and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 2210, 2300 or 2400/2401 or equivalent".

Delete "2261" from second line.

Delete "Philosophy 2809".

Following the heading Course Requirements for the Honours Degree in Environmental Science, Section 2 a) delete Biology 4505 and insert the following:

"Any two courses from:

Biology 4306 (Applied Biology)

Environmental Science 4069 (Fundamentals of Soil Systems)

Environmental Science 4479 (Groundwater Flow)".

Following the heading Course Requirements for the Honours Degree in Environmental Science, Section 2 b) insert the following:

"Environmental Science 4249 (Environmental Organic Chemistry)

or

Environmental Science 4239 (Aquatic Chemistry II)

and

Environmental Science 4069 (Fundamentals of Soil Systems)

or

Environmental Science 4479 (Groundwater Flow)"

Page 82, delete "Chemistry 2210-W", "Earth Science 2914-W-GE and 2915-W-GE" from the table.

Insert "2370-W" under the Environmental Science section.

Delete "4951-W" from the Environmental Science section and replace with "4959-W".

Page 89, amend prerequisite note for Environmental Science 3260 and 4240 by deleting "Chemistry 240B" and replacing with "Chemistry 2401".

Delete "and Laboratory" following the prerequisite note for Environmental Science 4239.

Amend the prerequisite note for Environmental Science 2430 and 2450 by deleting "Physics 1201" and replacing with "Physics 1021 or corequisite 1054".

Amend course description and prerequisite note for Environmental Science 4000 to read as follows:

"Current topics in environmental science are reviewed and discussed in a seminar format. Seminars will be presented on current research and environmental issues by faculty, students and guest speakers from universities, government and industry.

Prerequisite: This course is restricted to Environmental Science students who have completed eighty credit hours or more."

Amend the prerequisite note for Environmental Science 4080 by deleting "90" and replacing with "eighty".

Page 78-79, delete tables B.1, B.2, B.3, B.4 and B.5 in their entirety.

63.5 Faculty of Business Administration

Page 51, 1996-97 Calendar amend Regulation G. by inserting the following:

"Notwithstanding Clause 1, Distance Education courses may be used to fulfil the Residence Requirements of the non-co-operative degrees of Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Commerce (Honours), Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of Business Administration (Honours), and Bachelor of Nursing (Post-RN)."

Page 339, following the heading Programmes in Business Administration relabel current (f) as (h) and insert the following:

"(f) Bachelor of Business Administration

(g) Bachelor of Business Administration (Honours)"

Page 340, following the heading General Notes delete current Clause 2 and replace with the following:

"2) No student shall obtain more than one undergraduate degree from the Faculty of Business Administration."

Following the heading Appeals Procedures delete the first sentence and replace with the following:

"All of the regulations for business programmes (a) to (g) are subject to appeal."

Page 346, before the heading Course List insert the following new programme:

"Regulations for the General Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration

Admission

1) Normally, admission is offered for the Fall Term: the deadline for admission (or re-admission) is March 1. Where circumstances permit, applications will be considered for the Winter and Spring Terms: the deadlines for admission (or re-admission) are October 1 for Winter, and February 1 for Spring.

2) Students who are seeking admission for the Fall Semester normally must have completed all the courses required for admission by the end of the Winter Semester.

3) Applications received after the deadline will be considered only if a space is available in the programme.

4) Eligibility: To be eligible for Admission to the BBA programme an applicant must have successfully completed a minimum of thirty credit hours in university courses with an overall average of at least 65% on the courses comprising those thirty credit hours. The thirty credit hours must comprise:

a) Six credit hours in English courses;1

b) EITHER Mathematics 1080 and 1081 OR Mathematics 1000 and three credit hours chosen from courses in the Faculties of Arts and/or Science;

c) Economics 2010 and 2020;

d) Business 1000

e) Nine additional credit hours in non-Business courses, at least six of which must be in courses chosen from the Faculty of Arts and/or Science.

5) Admission is competitive and selective. Therefore, prospective students are encouraged to consider an alternate degree programme in the event that they are not accepted into the Bachelor of Business Administration programme.

6) The primary criterion used in reaching decisions on applications for admission is overall academic achievement. Selection, therefore will be based on a student's overall academic performance in addition to the average on the thirty credit hours required for admission. Students with weak overall academic records are unlikely to be admitted.

7) The Faculty recognizes that a candidate's academic performance can be viewed in the context of the individual's other interests, activities and accomplishments. Notwithstanding Clause 6 above, the Admissions Committee may consider extracurricular activities and achievements as factors in the admission decision. To assist the Admissions Committee in this area candidates for admission may complete and submit the personal Information Form to support their applications for admission.

8) In the case where an applicant has been required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Programme, the Admissions Committee of the Faculty may consider this circumstance as grounds to deny admission.

1It is strongly recommended that students complete English 1110, Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style, as one of these English courses.

The Curriculum

1) The BBA programme requires a total of 120 credit hours, i.e. 90 credit hours beyond the 30 credit hours required for admission.

2) In addition to the admission requirements, the curriculum shall consist of the successful completion of:

a) Sixty credit hours consisting of: Computer Science 2801, Statistics 2500, Economics 3150, Business courses 1101, 1201, 1600, 2000, 2101, 2201, 2301, 2401, 3320, 3401, 3700, 4000, 4320, 4401, 4500, 5301, and 7000.

b) Thirty other credit hours, of which not more than nine credit hours may be from courses in the Faculty of Business Administration.

3) For graduation, a student must be enrolled in the BBA programme, and have obtained a minimum average of 60% on the programme courses.

Minor or Cognate from another Academic Unit

1) A student enrolled in the BBA programme may complete a minor within the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science, or a cognate at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. Regulations for the minor are given under the Calendar entries for the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science, and regulations for cognates are given under the calendar entry for Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. 2) A student enrolled in the BBA programme may pursue a minor (or equivalent) in other non-business academic units (where minor programmes exist) with i) permission of that academic unit and ii) permission of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the Faculty of Business Administration.

Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration

An Honours degree of Bachelor of Business Administration signifies superior academic achievement.

1) To be considered for an Honours degree, the candidates must so indicate on the University's official "Application for Degree" form.

2) Candidates for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration shall

a) comply with all regulations governing the General Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration, and b) achieve at least a 75% numerical average and a grade point average of 2.5.

3) Candidates are not permitted to repeat or substitute courses for the purpose of meeting the academic standing specified in Clause 2.

4) A declared candidate for an Honours degree who fails to fulfil the conditions of Clause 2 but fulfils the requirements for a General degree shall be awarded the General Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration."

Page 347, following the course description for Business 3101 delete the following from the prerequisite note:

"and Business 2101".

Page 345, following the heading Curriculum, amend Clause 1 as follows: delete "Nine elective credit hours...Arts and/or Science" and replace with the following:

"- Nine credit hours in non-Business electives, at least six credit hours of which must be chosen from courses in the faculties of Arts and/or Science ".

Page 344, following the heading Regulations for the Diploma in Business Administration amend Clause 1) a) by deleting "65%" in the second paragraph and replacing with "60%".

Amend Clause 1) b) by deleting the word "two" and replacing with "five".

Delete Clause 1) c).

63.6 Bachelor of Recreation Degree Programme - School of Physical Education and Athletics

Page 251, 1996-97 Calendar delete the current entry for the School of Physical Education and Athletics and replace with the following:

"SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS

Director

Redden, W.L., B.P.E. New Brunswick, M.S.(P.E.), M.Ed. (G.P.S.) Springfield, Ph.D. Florida State

Associate Director, Professional Preparation Programme

Wood, G.A., B.P.E., B.Ed. Memorial, M.A.(P.E.), Ph.D. Alberta

Associate Director, Service Programme

Butler, F.T., B.P.E. Memorial, M.Ed.(P.E.) Springfield

Professors

Higgs, C., Dip.Phy.Ed. St. Luke's, B.Sc., M.Sc. Oregon, M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Oregon

Szvetko, D., B.A.(P.E.H.R.) Western Ontario, M.S. Michigan, Dr.E.P. Budapest

Associate Professors

Butler, F.T., B.P.E. Memorial, M.Ed.(P.E.) Springfield

Carroll, D.A., B.P.E. Memorial, M.A. Alberta; Sir Wilfred Grenfell College

Chapman, J.T., B.A., B.P.E. Memorial, M.A. Ohio State

Kuester, V., Dip.Phys.Ed. Durham, M.Ed. Bowling Green

Walton, Y.M., B.A., M.A.(P.E.) Western Ontario

Wood, G.A., B.P.E., B.Ed. Memorial, M.A.(P.E.), Ph.D. Alberta

Assistant Professors

Behm, D.G., B.P.E. Ottawa, M.S. McMaster

Kavanagh, B.G., B.P.E., B.Ed., M.P.E. Memorial, Ph.D. Iowa

Loeffler, T.A., B.A. Prescott College, M.S. Mankato State, Ph.D. Minnesota

McInnes, J.A., Dip.Phy.Ed. Carnegie College, M.S. Mankato State

Wheeler, R.E., B.P.E., B.Ed., M.P.E. Memorial

Physical Education Co-operative Programme

Barron, M., B.P.E. Calgary; Manager

Power, N., B.P.E, B.Ed. Memorial; Co-ordinator

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS

Students completing the former Recreation Option under the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) degree programme will follow former degree regulations. Students who were accepted into the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) degree programme shall be governed by the following regulations. Students who were accepted into the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative), Recreation Option are required to complete their programmes by August 31, 2000.


GENERAL COMMENTS

Study in the field of Physical Education (recreation and sport) began in the form of a two-year diploma programme in 1956 at the Memorial University Campus on Parade Street. The degree programme was approved by Senate in 1961 when the present campus opened. After twenty years as a Department, the unit gained the status of a Professional School in the Fall of 1976. The move to a co-operative education format was made in 1992.

It is clear that future trends in our society towards increased leisure time and personal responsibility for balanced, healthy lifestyles will require professionals in the field of physical education/recreation who are prepared to initiate and operate a wide variety of programmes to meet these needs.

The Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) at Memorial University is a Co-operative Programme, under which regular full-time academic terms are alternated with full-time work terms in positions related to the student's future career.

The Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Programme consists of six academic terms and four work terms. The six academic terms are designed with a common curriculum extending over the first two terms.

A Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) programme requiring additional courses in Physical Education (or in approved related fields) and superior academic achievement is also available.

The Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) at Memorial University is a Co-operative Programme, under which seven regular full-time academic terms are alternated with three full-time work terms in positions related to the student's future career.

A Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) programme requiring specific courses in Recreation (or in approved related fields) and superior academic achievement is also available.

During work terms students are brought into direct contact with the physical education/recreation profession, exposed to actual practical problems, expected to assume ever-increasing responsibility in employment as their education advances, and introduced to experiences far beyond the scope of those which could be provided in the University. The experiences should provide maturing prospective graduates with an early appreciation of the personal, social and economic aspects of physical education/recreation through direct association with professionals in a work environment.

Much of the experience gained in this type of programme would not be available to students until after graduation, in a conventional programme. This experience makes a significant contribution to their total education.

There are two options to choose from in completing the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Degree or the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) Degree:

1) Teaching - designed to be followed by the Bachelor of Education Degree (B.Ed.):

This option of the degree programme contains courses in curriculum planning, teaching methods and practice relevant to physical education curricula for various age groups. There will be an emphasis on placing the student in a school or teaching position for some of the work terms. The student normally completes the B.Ed. degree programme following the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) and will then be prepared for a career within a school setting.

2) General Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - designed to provide a basic professional preparation:

The generalist option of the programme consists of core courses common to the other options plus a flexible choice of electives, without the requirement for curriculum and methods courses necessary for the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative)/B.Ed. combination. This stream is designed to prepare graduates for work outside a school system.

The Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme normally takes 10 semesters to complete, except for the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) programme which normally requires one additional semester of study. Refer to Table 1 for the sequencing of academic and work terms.

Upon successful completion of the undergraduate programme as approved by the Academic Council and Senate, candidates will be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative), or Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative), as appropriate.

The Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) Degree programme is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop professional competencies in several aspects of leisure service management: conceptual foundations of recreation and leisure, professionalism in leisure services, leisure services delivery systems, programming strategies, assessment, planning and evaluation, administration and management, and legislative and legal aspects of recreation. The students will also gain an understanding of the social, physical, psychological, cultural, economic, and political issues that influence leisure participation, delivery, and management. The Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme normally takes 10 semesters to complete. Refer to Table 3 for the sequencing of academic and work terms.

Upon successful completion of the undergraduate programme as approved by the Academic Council and Senate, candidates will be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative), or Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative), as appropriate.

COURSES AVAILABLE TO NON BACHELOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (CO-OPERATIVE) STUDENTS

Students not registered in a Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme may register for three PHSD courses from the following list, if space is available and with instructor approval. A maximum of six additional credit hours from this list may be allowed by written permission of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.

2000. Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation

2310. Human Anatomy

2320. Primary Human Physiology

2410. Historical and Comparative Physical Education

3310. Physiology of Exercise

3330. Health Issues I

3350. Health Issues II

3410. Sociology of Sport

3520. Physical Recreation

4510. Social Recreation

4520. Recreation and the Newfoundland Community

COURSES AVAILABLE TO NON- BACHELOR OF RECREATION (CO-OPERATIVE) STUDENTS

Students not registered in the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme may register for RECR courses from the following list if space is available.

2000. Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation

2505. Recreation Programming and Evaluation

3525. Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems

3535. Legal Aspects of Leisure and Recreation Services

3555. Outdoor Recreation Management

3565. Tourism and Commercial Recreation

3575. Community Development and Recreation

4515. Principles and Practices of Social Recreation

4525. Strategic Planning for Recreation

4535. Camp Administration and Programming

4545. Facility Planning, Design, and Management

4555. Leadership and Supervision in Recreation

4565. Recreation Promotion and Marketing

4575. Recreation Ethics, Issues and Trends

4585. Financing Recreation Services

4625. Theoretical Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure

4635. Multicultural Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure

NON-ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

All applicants to the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme are required to:

1) submit proof of certification in a First Aid course from Red Cross or St. John Ambulance, and

2) pass the School swimming test

Further details are available from the School.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (CO-OPERATIVE)

SUMMARY OF ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

- 30 credit hours as specified

- SWIM TEST completed within two years prior to the application deadline

- FIRST AID CERTIFICATE (current)

- APPLICATION FORM AND HEALTH CARD (obtain from Office of Registrar)

- If applying from outside St. John's, call the School's General Office at (709) 737-8130 to contact the SWIM TEST COORDINATORS to arrange for testing.

The above items should all be submitted by MARCH 1 for September admission.

Admission

1) Admission to the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme is on the basis of a competition for a limited number of places. The final decision on admission rests with the Admission Committee of the School.

NOTE: First-year students intending to undertake the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme should note that it is possible to enter Term 1 only in the Fall Semester (September of each year). Attention is also drawn to the admission regulations below.

2) Application forms are available from the office of the Registrar. Applications should be submitted no later than March 1 of the year in which admission is sought.

NOTE: Students intending to complete their academic/non-academic prerequisites for admission during the Spring Semester, must, nevertheless, apply to the School by March 1.

3) All applications for admission or re-admission to the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. A complete application includes an application to the School, an application to the University (for those who have not registered for courses at Memorial University in either of the two preceding semesters), and supporting documentation (when necessary).

NOTE: Admission/re-admission to the University does not necessarily constitute admission/re-admission to the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme.

4) To be considered for admission to the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme, students are required to complete the following courses with an overall average of at least 55%:

- English 1080 and 1110, or equivalent

- Six credit hours in Psychology

- Six credit hours in Mathematics (excluding M102F, M103F and M104F)

- Six credit hours in Arts other than Arts 1000 or 1001

- Six credit hours in the same laboratory Science other than Science 115A and Science 115B

In addition to the course requirements indicated above, students are required to (a) pass the swimming test administered by the School, and (b) submit proof of current certification in First Aid from Red Cross or St. John Ambulance.

The requirements of clause 4 should normally be met no more than two years prior to entry into the programme.

5) Applicants seeking admission to Term 1 through transfer from another institution must have achieved an equivalent standing in comparable subjects. The applicant is responsible for having official transcripts and other supporting documentation forwarded from the relevant institution(s) to the Office of the Registrar.

6) Students may indicate on their Application for Admission to the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Degree programme that they wish to be considered for Advanced Standing. The Admissions Committee will forward its recommendation for advanced standing to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School for approval. No applicant granted advanced standing will be admitted beyond Academic Term 3. Advanced standing may be granted to students who have completed courses at Memorial or at a recognized post-secondary institution.



Students admitted into the programme at a level beyond Academic Term 1, without having successfully completed all courses required up to that level, must successfully complete each such course prior to the end of Academic Term 6. Successful completion shall mean a grade of 50% or higher in all non-Physical Education courses, and 60% or higher in all Physical Education courses.

7) Transcripts and other documentation must be submitted in English and all translations of documentation must be certified.

Students may be required to demonstrate, by test, their proficiency in English (see University General Regulations).

8) In special cases, the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School, on the recommendation of the Admission Committee, may waive the admission requirements, or deny admission to any student.

Programme of Study

1) Every candidate shall complete the six academic terms (seven for honours candidates) in the co-operative programme, in addition to the thirty credit hours required for admission, and shall normally be required to complete four work terms. Each academic term shall comprise of a minimum of fifteen credit hours. Hence, a total of one hundred and twenty credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme and one hundred and thirty-five credit hours for the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) programme.

2) Courses shall be taken in academic terms in the sequence, order and course load as set out in Table 1 - Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Programme. Academic terms and work terms shall be taken in the sequence as set out in Table 2 - Plan of Operation, The Co-operative Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Programme. Exceptions to this prescribed programme, including specified course load, must have the approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.

3) The need for a specific course(s) or work term requirement may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School for students who apply for exemption from the course(s) or work term requirement in question.

Students requesting exemption from any work term requirement must submit medical and/or other evidence to support such exemption, to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School. Notwithstanding the preceding, students must successfully complete a minimum of three work terms.

4) The non-Physical Education elective courses indicated in Table 1 - Academic Course Programmes, School of Physical Education and Athletics must be courses from the Faculties of Arts, Science or other faculties approved by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.

5) Students following the Teaching option and who plan to complete the Bachelor of Education Degree programme at Memorial, must choose a concentration of at least twenty-four credit hours from one of the subject areas listed in the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) degree regulations.

6) Students following the General option must choose non-Physical Education courses so that within the total programme they will have a concentration of (a) at least twenty-four credit hours in a non-Physical Education subject, or (b) at least twelve credit hours in each of two non-Physical education subjects. These courses shall be chosen in consultation with the School of Physical Education and Athletics.

7) IN ADDITION TO MEETING THE ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION, STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT PROOF OF A FIRST AID CERTIFICATION VALID AT THE TIME OF GRADUATION.

TABLE 1 ­ BACHELOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAMME

Teaching Option
Term 1(F) Term 2 (W) Term 3 (F) Term 4 (S) Term 5 (W) Term 6 (F) Term 7* (W)
Required Physical Education Courses 2.00e+15 2.22e+15 3.11e+15 3.22e+15 42104600 42204420 4610
Elective

Courses

3 credit hours in non-Physical Education 3 credit hours in non-Physical Education 3 credit hours in Physical Education 3 credit hours in non-Physical Education 3 credit hours in Physical Education &

6 credit hours in non-Physical Education

9 credit hours in non-Physical Education 12 credit hours approved by the Director




General Option
Term 1(F) Term 2 (W) Term 3 (F) Term 4 (S) Term 5 (W) Term 6 (F) Term 7* (W)
Required Physical Education Courses 2000

2100

2210

2310

2220

2300

2320

3340

3210

3300

3310

3220

3320

4310

4320

4210

4600

4220

4420

4610
Elective

Courses

3 credit hours in non-Physical Education 3 credit hours in non-Physical Education 6 credit hours in Physical Education or

3 credit hours in Physical Education &

3 credit hours in non-Physical Education

3 credit hours in non-Physical Education 3 credit hours in Physical Education &

6 credit hours in non-Physical Education or

9 credit hours in non-Physical Education

9 credit hours in non-Physical Education 12 credit hours approved by the Director

* Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) Programme Only

TABLE 2

PLAN OF OPERATION

THE CO-OPERATIVE BACHELOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMME

Year 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
of

entry

Sep-

Dec

Jan-

Apr

May-

Aug

Sep-

Dec

Jan-

Apr

May-

Aug

Sep-

Dec

Jan-

Apr

May-

Aug

Sep-

Dec

Jan-

Apr

May-

Aug

Sep-

Dec

1996 Term 1 Term

2

Work Term 1 Term

3

Work Term 2 Term

4

Work Term 3 Term

5

Work Term 4 Term

6

Term

7

1997 Term 1 Term

2

Work Term 1 Term

3

Work Term 2 Term

4

Work Term 3 Term

5

Work Term 4 Term

6



REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF RECREATION (CO-OPERATIVE)

Admission

1) Admission to the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme is on the basis of a competition for a limited number of places. The final decision on admission rests with the Admission Committee of the School.

NOTE: Students intending to undertake the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme should note that it is possible to enter Term 1 only in the fall semester (September of each year). Attention is drawn to the admission regulations below.

2) Application forms are available from the Office of the Registrar. Applications should be submitted no later than March 1 of the year in which admission is sought.

3) All applications for admission or re-admission to the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. A complete application includes an application to the school, an application to the University (for those who have not attended Memorial University in the preceding semesters), and supporting documentation (when necessary). Note: prior experience in recreation leadership will be considered during the admission process.

NOTE: Admission/re-admission to the University does not necessarily constitute admission/re-admission to the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme.

4) To be considered for direct-entry from high school to the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme, students are required to meet the General Admission requirements of Memorial University as outlined in the university calendar. Specifically, students must have completed Level III Advanced Math or Level III Academic Math with a grade of at least 70% or Level III Academic Math and scored at least 50% on the Math Skills Inventory.

5) Applicants seeking admission to the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme through the laddering programme from Cabot College must have completed the Diploma in Community Recreation Leadership with a minimum overall grade point average of three (3.0). The applicant is responsible for having official transcripts and other supporting documentation forwarded from Cabot College to the Office of the Registrar.

6) Applicants seeking admission to the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme through transfer from within Memorial University of Newfoundland or other accredited post-secondary programmes or institutions must have achieved a minimum overall average of 65% to be considered for admission. The applicant is responsible for having official transcripts and other supporting documentation forwarded from the relevant institution(s) to the Office of the Registrar. Transfer students from other post-secondary programmes or institutions will be placed in that term of the programme judged appropriate considering equivalent credits, as determined by the Admissions Committee of the School.

7) Students may indicate on their Application for Admission to the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) Degree programme that they wish to be considered for Advanced Standing. The Admissions Committee will forward its recommendation for advanced standing to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School for approval. No applicant granted advanced standing will be admitted beyond Academic Term 4.

Students admitted to the programme at a level beyond Academic Term 1, without successfully completing all courses required up to that level, must successfully complete each course prior to the end of Academic Term 7. Successful completion shall mean a grade or 50% or higher in all non-Recreation and non-Physical Education courses, and 60% or higher in all Recreation and Physical Education courses.

8) Transcripts and other documentation must be submitted in English and all translations of documentation must be certified.

Students may be required to demonstrate, by test, their proficiency in English (see University General Regulations).

9) In special cases, the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School, on the recommendation of the Admission Committee, may waive the admission requirements, or deny admission to any student.

Programme of Study

1) A total of one hundred and twenty credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme. Every candidate shall normally be required to complete three work terms. Students in the laddering programme from Cabot College and students who receive advanced standing are required to complete a minimum of two work terms.

2) Courses shall normally be taken in academic terms in the sequence, order and load as set out in Table 3 ­ Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) Programme. Academic terms and work periods shall normally be taken in the sequence as set out in Table 4 ­ Plan of Operation­Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) Programme.

3) The courses normally taken for the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme are as follows:

a) English 1080

b) Math 1000 or Math 1080/81 or Math 1050/51

c) Economics 2010

d) Statistics 2500

e) Business 2000

f) Business 1000, 1101, 1201, 2301, 4000, 4320, 4500

g) Three credit hours selected from Business 1600, 2101, 2201, 3101, 3320, 3700.

h) Twelve credit hours in courses from the Faculties of Arts and Science other than those listed above in clauses 3) a), b), c), d), e), f), and g) or other faculties approved by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.

i) Fifty-one credit hours in core Recreation Courses: 2000, 2100, 2505, 3340, 3525, 3535, 3555, 3565, 3575, 4330, 4525, 4545, 4555, 4565, 4575, 4585, 4600.

j) Eighteen credit hours in elective Recreation or Physical Education courses.

k) Three work terms of a semester's duration each.

4) The need for a specific course(s) or work term requirement may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School for students who apply for exemption from the course(s) or work term requirement in question. Students requesting exemption from any work term requirement must submit medical and/or other evidence to support such exemption, to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School. Notwithstanding the preceding, students must successfully complete a minimum of two work terms.

5) Students in the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme shall complete a minor in Business Administration consisting of twenty-four credit hours comprising the following courses: Business 1000, 1101, 1201, 2301, 4000, 4320, 4500 and one course chosen from Business 1600, 2101, 2201, 3101, 3320, 3700.

TABLE 3 ­ BACHELOR OF RECREATION (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAMME

Fall Semester Winter Semester Spring Semester
Year 1 Academic 1 Academic 2 Open
Recreation 2000

Recreation 2100

Business 1000

English 1080

Mathematics 1000 , 1080, or 1050

Recreation 2505

Recreation 3525

Business 1101

Business 2000

Non-Recreation Elective (Mathematics 1081 or 1051, if required)

Year 2 Academic 3 Academic 4 Work Term 1
Recreation 3535

Recreation 4545

Recreation or PHSD Elective

Business 1201

Statistics 2500

Economics 2010

Recreation 3340

Recreation 4565

Recreation 4600

Recreation or PHSD Elective

Business 2301

Non-Recreation Elective

Year 3 Academic 5 Work Term 2 Academic 6
Recreation 3575

Recreation 4525

Recreation or PHSD Elective

Business 4000

Business Elective

Non-Recreation Elective

Recreation 3555

Recreation 3565

Recreation 4330

Recreation 4555

Recreation or PHSD Elective

Recreation or PHSD Elective

Year 4 Work Term 3 Academic 7
Recreation 4575

Recreation 4585

Recreation or PHSD Elective

Business 4320

Business 4500

Non-Recreation Elective















TABLE 4

PLAN OF OPERATION

THE CO-OPERATIVE BACHELOR OF RECREATION PROGRAMME

Year 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
of entry Sep-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sep-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sep-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sep-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sep-

Dec

1996 Term 1 Term

2

Open Term

3

Term 4 Work Term 1 Term

5

Work Term 2 Term

6

Work Term 3 Term

7

1997 Term 1 Term

2

Open Term

3

Term 4 Work Term 1 Term

5

Work Term 2 Term

6

Work Term 3


EVALUATION AND PROMOTION

Success in the undergraduate degree programmes depends on meeting the requirements of both academic terms and work terms. A student of physical education should be able to obtain a work term position through the job competition for each work term. Employers are only likely to offer positions to students who can demonstrate the academic and personal qualities which fit them for the work concerned. Students must be able to communicate effectively when applying for positions and as required during the work term. Some assistance in the strengthening of communication skills is available for all students.

1) The Academic Council of the School constitutes the examining body for all physical education evaluations. The standing of every student will be assessed at the end of each academic term and at the end of each work term by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies which will then make its recommendations to Academic Council. The decisions of the Academic Council will be issued to individual students by mail and will be forwarded to the Registrar.

2) Students have the right to appeal any decision made by the School in regard to their promotion. Any such appeal must be made in writing to the Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School, within one month of the issue of results by the Academic Council.

3) To be promoted a student must, in addition to obtaining the requisite marks and average, complete and deliver all laboratory, project work, and work reports as required.

4) The Academic Council of the School may promote a student notwithstanding promotion requirements given below. A decision of this nature will be made only for reasons acceptable to Academic Council and in the case of a student thought likely to succeed in future terms.

5) Students to whom promotion is denied are no longer in the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) or Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programmes. Subject to regulations 12, 13 and 20, such students may be permitted to repeat unsuccessful terms. Those wishing to do so must apply for re-admission in accordance with the School and University re-admission regulations.

6) A student's status at the end of each academic term will be in one of the following three categories:

a) Clear promotion - requires an overall average of at least 60% with a mark of at least 60% in all Physical Education and Recreation courses, and at least 50% in all non-Physical Education and non-Recreation courses.

b) Probationary promotion - requires an overall average of at least 60%, with at least 50% in all courses, and at most one Physical Education or Recreation course mark below 60%.

c) Probationary (A) promotion-failure to successfully complete the required components of the activities course in a given semester, upon the recommendation of the course instructor/coordinator and/or the Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

d) Promotion Denied - if none of the above sets of criteria is satisfied.

7) A student who has a clear promotion can proceed to the next term in the programme.

8) A student with a probationary promotion at the end of Academic Term 1 may be permitted to enter Academic Term 2 with no conditions other than those of clause 11 which must be met by the end of Academic Term 2.

9) A student with a probationary promotion from Academic Terms 2 to 5 will continue to the subsequent work term under the condition that entry into the next academic term is not allowed until the student's status is transferred to a clear promotion under conditions outlined in clause 11.

10) A student with a probationary promotion or promotion denied at the end of Academic Term 6 for Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative), Academic Term 7 for Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative), Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative), and Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) will not be recommended for graduation until the student's status is changed to that of a clear promotion.

11) A student with a probationary (A) promotion in any semester will be permitted to enter subsequent semesters but will not receive a grade for that activities course until the outstanding items have been successfully completed. Academic Council will grant this status, taking into account the specific factors involved in each case. This status is not automatic, as failure to successfully complete all requirements of an activities course would normally result in a failing grade.

12) Transfer from a probationary promotion to a clear promotion will entail satisfying the School that the student is competent in the subject of the Physical Education course in which the student has failed to achieve 60%. This will normally entail re-examination, upon which the student will be declared to have passed or failed a test of competency in the subject concerned, without the assignment of a numerical grade on the test. Re-examination may be written, oral, practical or a combination of formats.

A re-examination will be at a time determined by the School. Failure to submit to the re-examination or failure in the re-examination will result in denial of promotion.

Remedial studies, including courses, may be recommended to be completed before re-examination.

In the case of probationary (A) status, the student shall successfully complete the missing course components before graduation.

13) Students denied promotion may seek to be re-admitted to the programme, after two semesters. Re-admission will normally be into the term which the

student failed. Students will be required to repeat all professional courses in which they obtained less than a grade of 60% in that term. A non-Physical Education or non-Recreation elective course may be replaced by a course acceptable in the student's programme.

Where students have successfully completed (60%) in all professional courses but failed a non-Physical Education or non-Recreation elective course, they may be readmitted into the next work term of their programme.

14) A student shall be permitted only one re-admission to the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) or Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) programme.

15) Students may be required to withdraw from their programme at any time, if, in the opinion of the School, they are unlikely to profit from continued attendance.

16) Successful completion of the work term requirements is a prerequisite to graduation. The dates for starting and finishing each work term are shown in the University Diary.

17) A competition for work term employment is organized by the School of Physical Education and Athletics. Students may request interviews for up to 12 jobs offered in the competition. Students give permission to the School of Physical Education and Athletics to supply their resume to potential employers.

18) Students may obtain their work term jobs outside the competition. Such jobs must be confirmed by letter from the employer and be approved by the School of Physical Education and Athletics on or before the official first day of the work term as outlined in the University Diary.

19) A Work Report must be submitted each work term on some phase of the student's current employment. This report must be approved by the employer and be submitted to the School of Physical Education and Athletics on or before the deadline date shown in the University Diary. Evidence of the student's ability to gather material relating to the job, analyze it effectively and present it in a clear, logical and concise form, will be required in the report. Late reports will not be evaluated, unless prior permission for a late report has been given by the School of Physical Education and Athletics.

20) The overall evaluation of the work term is the responsibility of the School of Physical Education and Athletics.

Two components are considered in work term evaluation: on-the-job performance and the Work Report. Each component is evaluated separately.

Evaluation of the work term will result in the assignment of one of the following promotion recommendations:

a) PASS WITH DISTINCTION: Indicates excellent performance in both the work report and work performance. The student is commended for his/her outstanding performance in each of the required components; pass with distinction has been awarded to each of the work report and work performance.

b) PASS: Indicates that performance meets expectations in both the work report and work performance. The student fully meets the requirements of a passing work report and completely satisfactory work term performance.

c) FAIL: Indicates failing performance in the work report and/or work performance.

For promotion from the work term, a student must obtain PASS WITH DISTINCTION or PASS.

On-the-job performance is assessed by the Programme Manager or a delegate using information gathered during the work term and input from the employer towards the end of the work term. Formal written documentation from the employer is sought.

The Work Report is evaluated by the Programme Manager or delegate. If an employer designates a report to be of a confidential nature, both employer and Programme Manager must agree as to the method to protect the confidentiality of such a report before the report may be accepted for evaluation.

21) If a student fails to achieve promotion from a work term, the student will be required to withdraw from the programme and may be considered for re-admission after the lapse of two semesters, at which time the student will be required to complete a further work term with satisfactory performance before being admitted to any further academic term in the School.

A given work term may be repeated only once, and not more than two work terms may be repeated in the entire programme.

Notwithstanding the above, a student who does not achieve promotion and who in the opinion of the School can benefit from a remedial programme, may be permitted an extension of time not to exceed the end of the Regular Registration Period of the subsequent semester to complete the requirements of the work term.

22) Students are not permitted to drop work terms without prior approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies upon the recommendation of the Programme Manager. Students who drop a work term without permission, or who fail to honour an agreement to work with an employer, or who conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause their discharge from the job, will normally be awarded a failing grade for that work term. Permission to drop a work term does not constitute a waiver of degree requirements, and students who have obtained such permission must complete an approved work term in lieu of the one dropped.

NOTE: Students should also refer to the General Regulations of the University.

23) Students who receive clear promotion from an academic term but who then experience an interruption in the continuation of their programme, must re-pass the fitness continuation test before proceeding to the next academic term in the programme.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION HONOURS (CO-OPERATIVE)

A Degree of Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) signifies superior academic achievement. A Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) degree requires, over and above the requirements of the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Degree, additional courses in Physical Education or in approved related fields. A Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) degree will be of advantage to students planning more advanced study in their chosen field.

1) A student may pursue a Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) degree in any of the two programme streams indicated.

2) Candidates for the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Cooperative) programme must apply for admission by submitting the completed honours

application to the Office of the Registrar, normally by Nov. 1 of the academic year in which they wish to enter the honours programme.

3) If accepted to the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) programme, each candidate's programme of studies must be approved by the Director or delegate.

4) Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) shall comply with all regulations governing the Degree of Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative), and shall complete an additional fifteen credit hours over and above the one hundred and twenty required for the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Degree.

These fifteen additional credit hours shall be as indicated in Table 1 - Academic Course Programme - School of Physical Education and Athletics.

5) The Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Cooperative) programme shall include Physical Education 4610 and four other courses approved by the Director or delegate.

6) A candidate shall:

a) maintain at least a 1.75 point average on the total number of courses required for the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) degree, and

b) maintain a grade of "B" or better in Physical Education courses, or an average of at least 75% in the minimum number of Physical Education courses required in the student's programme, and

c) Obtain a grade of at least "B" in the Physical Education Research Project (4610).

7) A declared candidate for a Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) degree who fails to fulfil the conditions of clause 6 but fulfils the requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative), shall be awarded the Degree of Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative).

8) Students who have been awarded the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) Degree may convert it to a Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) Degree by applying to the School and the Registrar and, upon approval of such application, completing the requirements for the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) Degree as set forth in the regulations.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF RECREATION HONOURS (CO-OPERATIVE)

A Degree of Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) signifies superior academic achievement. A Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) degree will be of advantage to students planning more advanced study in their chosen field.

1) Candidates for the Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) programme must submit the Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) Application Form to the Office of the Registrar by the last day of classes of Academic Term 4.

2) If accepted to the Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) programme, each candidate's programme of studies must be approved by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.

3) Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) shall comply with all regulations governing the Degree of Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative).

4) The Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) programme shall include Recreation 4610, and either Recreation 4625 or Recreation 4635.

5) A candidate shall:

a) maintain at least a 2.0 point average on the total number of courses required for the Bachelor of Recreation. Honours (Co-operative) degree, and

b) maintain a grade of "B" or better in Recreation and Physical Education courses, or an average of at least 75% in the minimum number of Recreation and Physical Education courses required in the student's programme, and

c) Obtain a grade of at least "B" in the Recreation Research Project (RECR 4610).

6) A declared candidate for a Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) degree who fails to fulfill the conditions of Clause 5 but fulfills the requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative), shall be awarded the Degree of Bachelor of Physical Recreation (Co-operative).

7) Students who have been awarded the Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) Degree may convert it to a Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) Degree by applying to the School and the Registrar and, upon approval of such application, completing the requirements for the Bachelor of Recreation Honours (Co-operative) Degree as set forth in the regulations.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHSD) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

2000. Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation. An introduction to the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural and historical concepts and influences in Physical Education and Recreation.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for PHSD 2000 and RECR 2000.

2100. Introduction to Organization and Administration. The course will introduce students to basic administrative functions in a work setting in Physical Education/Recreation. The laboratory sessions will assist students to develop skill in the basic computer applications relevant to these functions.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for PHSD 2100 and RECR 2100.

2300. Growth and Development. Introductory study of human growth and developmental factors and their influence on the learning of motor skills.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 2300 and the former PHSD 2120.

2310. Human Anatomy. A study of the structure of the human body with emphasis on selected systems (muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory).

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

2320. Primary Human Physiology. A study of bodily functions with emphasis on selected systems (muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory).

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

2410. Historical and Comparative Physical Education. A history of the development of Physical Education and Sport from ancient societies to modern times.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

3110. Curriculum Development and Teaching Methods in Primary and Elementary School Physical Education. This course will provide an overview, through a blend of theory and practical experience, of curriculum development and teaching methods as they apply to primary/elementary level Physical Education.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 3300.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 3110 and the former PHSD 311A/B or PHSD 2110.

3300. Motor Learning. This course will present an overview of motor learning and performance variables and their application to the teaching of physical skills, and will investigate motor control issues related to skill instruction.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 2300.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 3300 and the former PHSD 2120.

3310. Physiology of Exercise. Physiological effects of and body adaptations to muscular exercise, physical conditioning and training.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 2320.

3320. Kinesiology. The analysis of human movement; the mechanics of motion and the general application of kinesiology.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

Prerequisites: Physical Education 2310 and 2320 or permission of instructor.

3330. Health Issues I. Issues in personal and community health related to infectious illness, degenerative illness, heredity and nutrition.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

3340. Adapted Physical Activity and Recreation. The course presents an overview of current practices, philosophies and issues related to physical activity and recreation for persons with disabilities. Knowledge and understanding of various disabling conditions and consequent needs of persons with disabilities, including health, safety and fitness, and how these needs may be met in terms of physical activity will be emphasized.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 3340 and RECR 3340.

3350. Health Issues II. Issues in personal and community health related to environmental pollution, mental health, ageing, death and dying and holistic healing.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

3360. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. A basic introduction to the field of athletic therapy and sports medicine. The content focuses on the prevention and care of sports injuries and covers topics such as: preventive screening; safe environments; on the spot assessment and First Aid; legal responsibility; supportive taping/wrapping.

Prerequisites: PHSD 2310, PHSD 2320, Basic First Aid Course.

3410. Sociology of Sport. Analysis of functions of sport in Canadian and North American society. Areas include social organization of sport, sport and social processes, sport and social problems, socialization and stratification of sport, and violence in sport.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

421A/B. Advanced Coaching of a Selected Sport.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Field experience: Coaching assignment.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

4310. Evaluation in Physical Education. Programme evaluation and measurement of the components of physical performance. Statistical treatment and interpretation of data.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

4320. Fitness Leadership. A course designed to prepare physical education professionals in the administrative, interpretive, instructional, interpersonal and pedagogic competencies required for, and associated with fitness testing, teaching and leadership.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisites: Physical Education 2310, 2320, 3310 and 3320 or permission of instructor.

4330. Social Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. An introduction to the psychological factors that influence participation in sport and exercise and the psychological effects derived from participation.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for PHSD 4330 and RECR 4330.

4420. Issues in Physical Education. In this course students will explore through research and discussion, trends and issues basic to physical education and sport in today's society (e.g., violence in sport, equity).

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4600. Introduction to Research in Physical Education. An introduction to research methodologies currently employed in Physical Education.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite: Physical Education 4310.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for PHSD 4600 and RECR 4600.

4610. Physical Education Research Project. A detailed study, under supervision, of a selected topic in the field of Physical Education or Recreation. The topic must be approved by the Director of the School.

Lectures: Three hours per week .

Prerequisite: Physical Education 4310, 4600.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for PHSD 4610 and RECR 4610.

4910. Directed Study. Approval of Committee on Undergraduate Studies and the instructor. (Permission to enrol to be obtained in the term preceding enrolment).

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Education 2194. Physical Education in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). The curriculum organization in physical education for the Primary and Elementary grades; instructional material and teaching techniques for these grades; creative, aesthetic and health-developing aspects of Physical Education.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Education 2194 and the former Education 3070, or the former Education 2192 taken during the 1984-85 or 1985-86 academic year.

Education 3090. Physical Education in the Secondary School (H). Curriculum organization, programme planning, instructional content and teaching techniques in Physical Education for Secondary Schools.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Education 2194 and 3090 are option courses offered to students in the Faculty of Education only.

ACTIVITY COURSES

Attendance is required in PHSD 2210, 2220, 3210, 3220, 4210, 4220.

Students who are absent for more than six class hours in any of these courses may be required to withdraw from the remainder of the course. Students required to withdraw from a course for failure to comply with attendance regulations will receive a grade of 0 F.

2210. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Movement concepts: the conceptual approach to teaching physical activity. Application through various forms of dance (e.g., creative, folk).

Attendance: Six hours per week.

Throughout the following fifteen credit hours a number of teaching methods may be employed; emphasis will be placed on the language and practice of the conceptual approach.

2220. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Gymnastics and Aquatics.

Attendance: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: PHSD 2210.

3210. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Court Games: volleyball, tennis, badminton, plus a selection of other court games. Individual Activities: track and field, wrestling, and other combative activities.

Attendance: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: PHSD 2220.

3220. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Target and Field Games: golf, archery, softball. Outdoor Activities (Summer): canoeing, navigational skills, lightweight camping, over-night canoe trip, introduction to rock climbing.

Attendance: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: PHSD 3210.

4210. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Territorial Games 1: ice hockey, water polo, lacrosse. Outdoor Activities (Winter): snow travel methods emphasizing cross-country skiing, navigational skills, winter survival/camping, overnight camping.

Attendance: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: PHSD 3220.

4220. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Territorial Games 2: (Outdoor) soccer, rugby. (Indoor) basketball, team handball.

Attendance: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: PHSD 4210.

RECREATION (RECR) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

2000. Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation. An introduction to the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural and historical concepts and influences in Physical Education and Recreation. An orientation to the profession is provided as well.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 2000 and PHSD 2000.

2100. Introduction to Organization and Administration. The course will introduce students to basic administrative functions in a work setting in Physical Education/Recreation. The laboratory sessions will assist students to develop skill in the basic computer applications relevant to these functions.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 2100 and PHSD 2100.

2505. Recreation Programming and Evaluation. This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of methodologies, skills, and materials for planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating professional recreation programmes for diverse populations in a variety of settings.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

3340. Adapted Physical Activity and Recreation. The course presents an overview of current practices, philosophies and issues related to physical activity and recreation for persons with disabilities. Knowledge and understanding of various disabling conditions and consequent needs of



Bachelor of Recreation Degree Programme - School of Physical Education and Athletics (cont'd)

persons with disabilities, including health, safety and fitness, and how these needs may be met in terms of physical activity will be emphasized.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both RECR 3340 and PHSD 3340.

3525. Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems. This course will provide a introduction to recreation and sport delivery systems in Newfoundland and Canada. The course will examine the various agencies that administer recreation and sport at municipal, provincial and national levels.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: RECR 2000.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 3525 and the former PHSD 3250 or PHSD 4520.

3535. Legal Aspects of Leisure and Recreation Services. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity for in-depth study of legal issues related to the operation of leisure services and facilities. Issues of tort and contract liability, employment related legal aspects, human rights and freedoms, and administrative procedures involved in property acquisition, law enforcement and risk management are the topics of this course.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: RECR 2100 or PHSD 2100.

3555. Outdoor Recreation Management. An overview of outdoor recreation practices in Newfoundland and Canada. This course will examine the management of resources, conservation education and practices, development for public use or exclusion; legislation related to management of risk; viability of facilities; national and provincial agencies; private commercial ventures; and future trends in management. Management strategies will form a major part of the course.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 3555 and the former PHSD 3550.

3565. Tourism/Commercial Recreation. The course will examine behavioral factors influencing tourism; promotion of commercial recreation attractions; provincial strategies in travel and tourism; problems of leisure travel; stability of entrepreneurial ventures in tourism; and research and planning strategies relevant to commercial ventures.

Lectures: Three hours per week

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 3565 and the former PHSD 3560.

3575. Community Development and Recreation. This course introduces various theoretical perspectives on community organization and development, as well as methods available to the recreation practitioner to facilitate the development of recreation services in communities. This course examines, in particular, recreation services delivery which involves community residents and groups in recreation programme decision-making and implementation.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4330. Social Psychology of Sport, Physical Activity, and Recreation. An introduction to the psychological factors that influence participation in sport, exercise, and recreation and the psychological effects derived from participation.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4330 and PHSD 4330.

4515. Principles and Practices of Social Recreation. This course focuses on the variety of settings where social interaction is of primary importance rather than an incidental by-product. The major categories of art, crafts, dance, drama, social games are examined in detail. Strong emphasis is placed upon the development of skills for leading social recreation activities.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4515 and the former PHSD 4510.

4525. Strategic Planning for Recreation. This course focuses on the strategic planning process and how it can be used within recreation organizations. The course is designed to introduce students to various planning theories and to provide students with opportunities to develop skills in strategic and other planning processes.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4535. Camp Administration and Programming. Organization of residence and mobile camps, camp ownership, site, property, buildings, health and safety, staff recruitment, budget, programming, operation and evaluation.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4535 and the former PHSD 4530.

4545. Facility Planning, Design and Management. Major considerations in selecting site, size, type and usage of the more popular facilities. Problems in design, layout and function, standards and modifications.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4545 and the former PHSD 4540.

4555. Leadership and Supervision in Recreation. Need, selection, training and supervision of leaders in recreation. Certification, standards and professional organizations. Evaluation of leadership - materials and methods used. Practical exposure to roles of both leader and supervisor through seminar and related fieldwork.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4555 and the former PHSD 4550.

4565. Recreation Promotion and Marketing. The course will examine the communication processes, marketing strategies and evaluative methods that enable an agency to promote its products, programmes and services.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4565 and the former PHSD 4560.

4575. Recreation Ethics, Issues and Trends. The course will explore contemporary trends and issues identified by governments and recreation practitioners and the way in which these issues influence the delivery of leisure services.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4575 and the former PHSD 4570.

4585. Financing Recreation Services. The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for in-depth study of financing leisure services in a variety of settings. The primary learning objectives are to achieve an understanding of revenue sources, financial management and budgeting, the concepts of equity from a justice, social and economic perspective, and the ability to use various techniques in the allocation of resources, the pricing of services, and ascertaining the costs of providing services.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4600. Introduction to Research in Physical Education and Recreation. An introduction to research methodologies currently employed in Physical Education and Recreation.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both RECR 4600 and PHSD 4600.

4610. Recreation Research Project. A detailed study, under supervision, of a selected topic in the field of Recreation. The topic must be approved by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.

Lectures: Three hours per week

Prerequisite: Recreation 4600

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both RECR 4610 and PHSD 4610.

4625. Theoretical Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure. The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth overview and analysis of current theoretical perspectives/paradigms related to the leisure experience. A parallel purpose is to examine psychological, sociological and social-psychological constructs that contribute to a contemporary, interdisciplinary understanding of recreation and leisure.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4635. Multicultural Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure. A cross-cultural analysis of recreation and leisure and their relationship to culture. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the interrelationships of the social, physical, psychological, economic, and political aspects of leisure and recreation in various cultures.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4915. Directed Study. Approval of Committee on Undergraduate Studies and the instructor. (Permission to enroll to be obtained in the term preceding enrolment).

Lectures: Three hours per week.

WORK TERMS

NOTE: (PHSD refers to Physical Education courses and RECR refers to Recreation courses)

001W. Work Term 1 (PHSD, RECR) (Spring Semester). This Work Term follows successful completion of Academic Term 2 (Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative)) and Academic Term 4 (Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)). Students are expected to learn, develop and practise the high standards of professional behaviour and performance expected in the work environment. As one component of the Work Term, the student is required to complete a Work Report.

002W. Work Term 2 (PHSD, RECR) (Winter Semester). This Work Term follows successful completion of Academic Term 3 (Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative)) and Academic Term 5 (Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)). Students are expected to further expand and develop their professional knowledge and skills and should be able to accept increased responsibility and challenge in the work place. As one component of the Work Term, the student is required to complete a Work Report.

003W. Work Term 3 (PHSD, RECR) (Fall Semester). This Work Term follows successful completion of Academic Term 4 (Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative)) and Academic Term 6 (Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)). Students should have sufficient academic grounding and work experience to exercise greater independence and responsibility in their assigned work. As one component of the Work Term, the student is required to complete a Work Report.

004W. Work Term 4 (PHSD) (Spring Semester). This is the final Work Term and follows successful completion of Academic Term 5. Students should be able to demonstrate professional behaviours and competencies at a high level during this final work placement. As one component of the Work Term, the student is required to complete a Work Report.

WORK REPORTS

A Work Report, on a topic approved by the Programme Manager or delegate, must be submitted for each work term. The report must be approved by the employer and submitted to the School on or before the deadline scheduled by the School. Evidence of the student's ability to gather material relevant to the report, analyze it effectively and present it in a clear, logical and concise form, will be required in the report.

Topics may include work report writing, work term evaluation, career planning, employment seeking skills, resumé preparation, interview skills, ethics and professional concepts, behaviourial requirements in the work place - among others.

NOTE: Seminars on professional development, conducted by the School of Physical Education and Athletics, are presented during Academic Terms 1 and 2 to prepare the student for participation in subsequent Work Terms.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAMME

General management of the work terms in the Co-operative Programme is the responsibility of the School of Physical Education and Athletics. The School, through its Programme Manager and delegates, is responsible for assisting potential employers to become involved in the programme, for the continual development of employment opportunities, for arranging student-employer interviews, for counselling of students, for visiting them on their work assignments and for the grading of the work term.

Students and employers choose each other through the School's placement process. Job notices are posted and students may apply for up to twelve interviews. Employers' representatives come on campus and interview students, after which both the students and employers express their preferences for one another.

Students are then placed by the School to fit expressed preference. While the School does not guarantee paid placement, every effort is made to ensure that appropriate employment is made available. In the case of students who are required to withdraw from the programme, the School has no responsibility for placement until they have been re-admitted to the programme.

Salaries paid cooperative students are determined within the employer's own wage structure, and can be expected to increase as the student progresses through the programme and assumes more responsibility. However, students should not expect income from work terms to make them completely self-supporting.

Students in the co-operative programme give permission to prospective employers, in the course of the interview process, to have access to their records, which contain their academic marks and their work term evaluations. After placement, students may not withdraw from a specific job situation unless prior permission is obtained from the Programme Manager of the School."

63.7 School of Music

Page 173, 1996-97 Calendar delete the section Regulations for a Minor in Music History under the B.A. Degree in its entirety and replace with the following:

"MINOR IN MUSIC HISTORY (BACHELOR OF ARTS)

A. The minor in music history is not applicable to the Bachelor of Music degree.

B. To be admitted to the minor in music history, students must meet the prerequisites for Music 1107 and 1127.

C. Students shall complete the following requirements (27 credit hours) for the minor in music history:

1. Music 1107, 1108, 1117, 1118, 1127, and 1128.

2. Music 1002, 1003, 2002, and 2003.

3. An additional six (6) credit hours in music history, chosen from courses at the 3000 or 4000 level.

D. Course prerequisites stipulated in the course descriptions must be met. Please note that most music courses are not offered every semester, and some are offered only in alternate years."

Delete the section Interdisciplinary Major Programme in Drama and Music under the B.A. Degree in its entirety and replace with the following:

"INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJOR IN DRAMA AND MUSIC (BACHELOR OF ARTS)

A. Students must complete at least 27 credit hours in Music, as follows:

1. Music 2011 and 2012.

2. Music 1107, 1108, 1117, 1118, 1127 and 1128

3. Music 2107 and 2117.

4. Music 2311 and 2313.

5. Music 3007.

6. Two (2) credit hours of large ensemble, chosen from Music 2611-2616.

B. Further courses in music theory and/or music history may be chosen as Arts electives.

C. Course prerequisites stipulated in the course descriptions must be met. In particular, note the prerequisites for Music 1107 and 1127.

D. Most music courses are not offered every semester, and some are offered only in alternate years.

Delete the section Concentration in Music under Clause 2(f) of the Regulations for the Bachelor of Education Degree in its entirety and replace with the following:

"CONCENTRATION IN MUSIC UNDER CLAUSE 2(F) OF THE BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (PRIMARY) AND BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY):

Students pursuing a concentration in music in the Bachelor of Education (Primary) or Bachelor of Education (Elementary) degree programme must complete:

Music 1107, 1117, 1127

Music 1108, 1118, 1128

Music 2011, 2012

Music 2311, 2312, 2313, 2314".

Page 173, delete the course numbers, titles, and descriptions for Music 1020/2000, 1021/2001, 2005, and 3501.

Amendment to a previous calendar change approved at Senate at a meeting held April 9, 1996, amend the prerequisite note for Music 3108 to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: Music 2107".

Insert the following before the Course List:

COURSE EQUIVALENTS

For the purposes of credit restrictions and equivalent credit, the following course equivalents apply:

Old Programme New Programme
150A/B 140A/B + 2 cr.hrs. of 1611
250A/B 240A/B + 2 cr. hrs. from 2611-2614
350A/B 340A/B + 2 cr. hrs. from 2611-2616
355A/B 345A/B + 2 cr. hrs. from 2611-2616
450A/B 440A/B + 2 cr. hrs. from 2611-2616
455A/B 445A/B + 2 cr. hrs. from 2611-2616
251A/B 2311 + 2312 + 2313 + 2314
351A/B 3311 + 3312 + 3241 + 3242 + 2 courses from 3231-3233
451A/B 3221 + 3222 + 3281 + 3282 + 3315 + 3316
1113 1107 + 1117 + one of 1127, 1137
1114 1108 + 1118 + one of 1128, 1138
2113 2107 + 2117 + one of 2127, 2128
2114 2108 + 2118 + one of 2128, 2138
3103 4102
3113 3108
3114 3107 + 3117
3595 3513
3602 3060
3702 3070
4501 4311
4502 3513


Amendment to a previous calendar change approved at Senate at a meeting held April 9, 1996, following the heading Bachelor of Music Degree: Admission and Academic Standards insert clause 16 to read as follows:

"16. Supplemental examinations are not normally available for music courses. However, in exceptional circumstances the Committee on Undergraduate Studies may give permission for a supplemental examination to be administered."

63.8 Department of Linguistics

Page 149, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Regulations, Clause 3 after "History 3803, 3806, 4214" insert new line as follows:

"Linguistics 3220".

Delete course numbers, titles and course descriptions for Linguistics 4050 and 4051.

Amend the course description for Linguistics 3850 to read as follows:

"Introduction to the study of linguistic meaning. Word- and sentence-level semantics, grammatical meaning, pragmatics, and logical aspects of meaning."

Page 151, amend section 1. Native Languages of Canada to read as follows:

"1. Aboriginal Languages of Canada".

Amend the prerequisite note of Linguistics 4010-4091 to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: Linguistics 2103 and 2104, or the permission of the instructor and the Head of the Department."

Amend the title for Linguistics 4030 and 4031 to read as follows:

"Linguistic Introduction to Innu-aimun (Montagnais/Naskapi) I and II."

New Courses

1101. The Wonder of Word. A non-technical introduction to the structure of words. This course presents methods of linguistic analysis based on the words of the student's own language. The origins of technical/scientific words are studied, together with the ways that these words may change in structure, sound, and meaning.

4065 and 4066. Linguistic Introduction to the Structure of Fijian I and II.

2060. Aboriginal Languages of Eastern Canada. An overview of the aboriginal languages of three language families of Eastern Canada: Eskimo-Aleut (Inuttut) and Algonquian (Innu-aimun, Micmac, Maliseet-Pasmaquoddy and Beothuk) and Iroonquian (Mohawk) with respect to both linguistic structure and current vitality. The history of language suppression and revitalization efforts, within the context of the larger issues of minority language attrition and maintenance.

3220. Linguistics and Law. An overview of the many relationships between linguistics and the Judaical process. Topics to be covered include: the language of legal texts, and the Plain English movement language use in legal settings (such as eyewitness testimony, jury instructions, and the language of lawyer-client interactions); the legal disadvantages which language may impose on speakers of minority languages and non-standard dialects; and the emerging discipline of forensic linguistics (which deals with such issues as voice and authorship identification, and linguistic interpretation of evidence).

63.9 Department of German and Russian

Page 143, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading General Degree insert the following new heading after the first paragraph:

"GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE MAJOR PROGRAMME".

Following the second paragraph insert the following new heading:

"GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE MINOR PROGRAMME".

Amend the fourth paragraph to read as follows:

"NOTE: German 2910, 3911, 3912 and 3913 and the Special Topics courses in German Studies will not normally count towards a Major or Minor in German Language and Literature.".

Following the above note, insert the following new heading and programme requirements to read as follows:

"GERMAN STUDIES MINOR PROGRAMME

A Minor in German Studies is offered as a special programme of an interdisciplinary nature, consisting of a minimum of 24 credit hours in courses as follows:

a) Eighteen credit hours in German, including: 1000; 1001; either 2010 and 2011 or 2510 and 2511; 2900; 2901;

b) Six credit hours taken in either additional courses in German and/or from cognate courses offered by other departments, to be chosen through prior consultation with the Head of the Department of German and Russian.

Following the heading General Degree amend the fifth paragraph to read as follows:

"NOTE: German 2030, 2031, 2900, 2901, 2910, 3911, 3912, 3913 and the Special Topics courses in German Studies may not be used as part of the Faculty or Arts requirement for six credit hours in a second language."

New courses

3000-3009. Special Topics in German Studies I.

Delete course numbers and titles for German 4800 and 4801 and replace with the following:

"4802-4811. Special Topics in German Studies II."



63.10 Music History Minor, Drama and Music Interdisciplinary Major and Clause 8(g) of the Regulations for the General Degree of Bachelor of Arts

Page 124, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Drama and Music delete section b and replace with the following:

A. Students must complete at least 27 credit hours in Music, as follows:

1. Music 2011 and 2012.

2. Music 1107, 1108, 1117, 1118, 1127 and 1128

3. Music 2107 and 2117.

4. Music 2311 and 2313.

5. Music 3007.

6. Two (2) credit hours of large ensemble, chosen from Music 2611-2616.

B. Further courses in music theory and/or music history may be chosen as Arts electives.

C. Course prerequisites stipulated in the course descriptions must be met. In particular, note the prerequisites for Music 1107 and 1127.

D. Most music courses are not offered every semester, and some are offered only in alternate years."

Delete the course descriptions for Music 1020/2000, Music 1021/2001, Music 2005, and Music 3501.

Page 113, following the heading Regulations of the General Degree of Bachelor of Arts delete Clause 8.g) and replace with the following:

"g) A Minor in Music History is available to students who meet the prerequisites for Music 1107 and 1127. This programme is governed by regulations which are detailed under the Calendar entry for the School of Music."

63.11 Department of Sociology

New Course

3410. Sociology of Sport. (Same as Physical Education 3410). An examination of the relationship between sport and society. Areas could include social origin of sport, social history of sport, religion and sport, sport and socialization, sport and social stratification, gender and sport, violence in sport, sport and nationalism.

Page 162, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Sociology, sub-headings General, First Course delete the third and fourth sentences and replace with the following:

"Before taking 3000-level courses, student must have taken at least six credit hours in courses below the 3000 level. To take courses at the 4000 level, students must have previously taken at least nine credit hours in courses at the 3000 level."

Page 164, amend the prerequisite note for Sociology 4150, 4160 and 4170 by deleting the following:

"and 3160".

Delete the course numbers, titles, and course descriptions for Sociology 3170 and 3710.

Page 145, following the heading Russian Studies Minor delete the following:

"Sociology 3710. Post-Soviet Society".

63.12 Department of Geography

Page 142, 1996-97 Calendar amend the course description for Geography 4150 to read as follows:

"4150. Environmental Change and Quaternary Geography. (Same as Anthropology 4150). Methods of reconstructing Quaternary environments; effects of Quaternary environmental change on landforms, with special reference to North America; development and characteristics of glacial and non-glacial climates.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Geography 3110, 3150 or permission of Head of Department."

Amend course description for Geography 4141 to read as follows:

"4141. Glacial Environments. An examination of the landforms, processes and sediments of past and present glacial environments. Course work will stress broad applications to environmental science.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory/field work per week.

Prerequisite: Geography 3150 or the former Earth Sciences 3700.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both 4141 and the former Earth Sciences 4701."

63.13 Department of Classics

Page 122, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Prerequisites delete Clauses 1 and 2 and replace with the following:

"1. Classics 2200 is the normal prerequisite for Classics 2205.

2. Classics 2205 is the normal prerequisite for any Latin course in the 3000 or 4000 series."

Following the heading Prerequisites insert new Clause 3 to read as follows:

"3. Classics 2305 is the normal prerequisite for any Greek course in the 3000 or 4000 series."

Page 123, following the entry for Latin 2200 insert the following new entry:

"2202. Medieval Latin. (Same as Medieval Studies 3005). An introduction to Medieval Latin through the reading of selections by a variety of authors.

Prerequisite: Classics 120B."

Page 122, following the course title of Greek 2302 insert the following:

"(Same as Religious Studies 2302)."

63.14 Medieval Studies Programme

Page 153, 1996-97 Calendar, amend entry for 3350-3360 to read as follows:

"3350-3360, excluding 3351. Special Topics in Medieval Studies."

Insert new entry:

"3351. Women Writers in the Middle Ages. (Same as Women's Studies 3001). The course will study selections from the considerable corpus of women's writings in the Medieval period, as well as issues which affected women's writing. All selections will be read in English translation."

New Course

3005. Medieval Latin. (Same as Classics 2202). An introduction to Medieval Latin through the reading of selections by a variety of authors.

Prerequisite: Classics 120B.

Following the heading Regulations: Majors amend Clause 2) to read as follows:

"2) Six credit hours from MST 3000, 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004 and 3005, or three credit hours from MST 3000, 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004 and 3005 and three credit hours from MST 3350-3360."

Following the heading Regulations: Minors amend Clause 2) to read as follows:

"2) Six credit hours from MST 3000, 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004 and 3005, or three credit hours from MST 3000, 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004 and 3005 and three credit hours from MST 3350-3360."

Page 153, following the heading List A: Other Courses Approved for Inclusion in Medieval Studies Major and Minor Programmes Subject to the Foregoing Regulations, sub-heading 3000 level courses delete the following:

"Music 3002".

63.15 Women's Studies Programme

Page 166, 1996-97 Calendar, immediately following the heading Women's Studies delete the first sentence and replace with the following:

"Programme Coordinator: Dr. Rosonna Tite"

Following the heading Regulations amend Clause 3 to read as follows:

"3) A minimum of 12 credit hours in courses from the Core Course List outlined below, taken in at least three different subject areas."

Following the heading Regulations amend the first paragraph of Clause 4 to read as follows:

"An additional six credit hours in courses to be chosen from the Core and/or Elective Lists outlined below. One of these courses may be a selected topics or directed readings course in any Arts subject relevant to the Minor programme."

Following the heading Course List, sub-heading Required Courses delete the course descriptions for Women's Studies 2000 and 4000.

Delete the section "Optional Courses" in its entirety.

Amend List A to read as follows:

"Core Courses

- Anthropology 3305. Anthropology of Gender

- Anthropology 4081. Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of Gender

- English 3817. Writing and Gender

- English 3830. Women Writers

- German 4800.* Women in German Society and Culture

- History 3760. Women in Western Society and Culture (I)

- History 3770. Women in Western Society and Culture (II)

- History 3821.* Selected Topics in Canadian Women's History

- History 4006.* Women in the Middle Ages

- Linguistics 3212. Language, Sex and Gender

- Political Science 3140*. Feminist Political Theory

- Political Science 3340*. Women and Politics

- Psychology 2540. Psychology of Gender and Sex Roles

- Religious Studies 2800. Women in Western Religions

- Religious Studies 2801. Women in Eastern Religions

- Social Work 5522. Women and Social Welfare

- Sociology/Anthropology 3314. Gender and Society

- Sociology/Anthropology 4092. Gender and Social Theory

- Women's Studies 2001. Women and Science

- Women's Studies 3000-3020 (excluding 3001, 3004, 3009). Special topics in Women's Studies

- Women's Studies 3001/Medieval Studies 3351*. Women Writers of the Middle Ages

- Women's Studies/Russian Studies 3004. Images of Women in Russian Culture

- Women's Studies/Sociology 4107*. Women and Technological Change (formerly Women's Studies 3009)"

Delete List B and replace with the following:

"Elective Courses

- Education 3565. Gender and Schooling

- History 4226*. Class and Gender in North American History

- Philosophy 2805. Contemporary Issues

- Psychology 3533. Sexual Behaviour

- Religious Studies 3650. Religion and Social Justice

- Religious Studies 3670. Religion, Ethics and Human Sexuality

- Sociology/Anthropology 2270. Families

- Sociology/Anthropology 3318. Culture and Aging"

Following List B relabel second paragraph as note 2 and insert new note 3 to read as follows:

"NOTE:

1) Normal prerequisites and waiver policies in the respective departments will apply.

2) Education 3565 may be applied to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree only in the case of students who complete the Women's Studies Minor Programme.

3) Courses marked with * are not offered on a regular basis."

Insert the following:

"Consult the appropriate department for scheduling information.

Women's Studies 2000. An Interdisciplinary Introduction to Women's Studies. An interdisciplinary introduction to the major concepts, issues and debates of Women's Studies.

Women's Studies 2001. Women and Science. An investigation of historical and contemporary contributions of women scientists, especially Canadians; different sciences and how they study women; and feminist and other perspectives on gender and science.

Three hours of lectures per week.

Women's Studies 3001. Women Writers in the Middle Ages. (same as Medieval Studies 3351). The course will study selections from the considerable corpus of women's writings in the Medieval period, as well as issues which affected women's writing. All selections will be read in English translation.

Women's Studies 4000. Seminar in Women's Studies. An interdisciplinary seminar designed to focus on women's issues, and on theories and methodologies of women's studies.

Three hour seminar per week.

Prerequisites: Students must normally have completed Women's Studies 2000 and 15 credit hours in other Women's Studies Programme courses before taking Women's Studies 4000. In exceptional cases, students without these prerequisites may be accepted into the course, with the approval of the instructor of WSTD 4000 and the Programme Coordinator.

Women's Studies 4107. Women and Technological Change. (Same as Sociology 4107). This advanced seminar will provide an interdisciplinary survey of the effects of technology on women's lives. Topics could include: The historical development of domestic technology; changes in workplace technology and their impact on women; assessing technologies from a feminist perspective; the design of technological systems; biomedical and reproductive technologies; information technologies; biotechnology; development in architecture and design; women, development, and technology; women and weapons technology; women and ecology; future technological change and women's lives. The course will combine seminar discussions of reading with films, workplace tours and guest speakers.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Women's Studies/Sociology 4107 and the former Women's Studies 3009.

63.16 Department of Anthropology

Page 118, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Course List delete the prerequisite note for Anthropology 3020, 3040, 3290, 3291, 3500, 3510, 3515 and 3561.

Page 117, following the heading General Degree sub-heading 2. Major Options add the following sentence at the end of the first paragraph:

"Courses are designated as S/C, A/P, or S/A, according to which option they belong."

Following the heading Course List amend prerequisite for Anthropology 2430 to read as follows:

"A/P 1030".

Amend prerequisite for Anthropology 2480 to read as follows:

"A/P 1030".

Amend prerequisite for Anthropology 3505 to read as follows:

"A/P 2480 and A/P 3500".

Amend prerequisite for Anthropology 3590 to read as follows:

"A/P 1030 and S/C 1031".

Amend prerequisite for Anthropology 4041 to read as follows:

"A/P 2430 and A/P 3040".

Amend prerequisite for Anthropology 4170 to read as follows:

"A/P 2480 and nine additional credit hours in A/P courses".

Amend prerequisite for Anthropology 4411 to read as follows:

"A/P 2480 and A/P 4182".

Amend prerequisite for Anthropology 4500 to read as follows:

"A/P 2480 or permission of instructor".

Page 117, following the heading General Degree, sub-heading 2. Major Options, Clause a) amend the first sentence to read as follows:

"Students wishing to concentrate in this option must take A/P 1030 and S/C1031, six credit hours ..."

Following the heading General Degree, sub-heading 2. Major Options, Clause b) amend the first sentence to read as follows:

"Students wishing to concentrate in this option must take A/P 1030 and S/C1031, Anthropology 2430 ..."

Following the heading General Degree, sub-heading 2. Major Options, insert the following at the end of Clause a):

"Students should note that the completion of S/C 1031 and one 2000-level S/C course is a prerequisite for all S/C 3000-level courses, and that two S/C courses at the 2000-level or above are prerequisites for all S/C 4000-level courses. For the purposes of these regulations S/A courses may be substituted for unspecified S/C courses."

Page 118, following the heading Course List delete the note following the course descriptions for Anthropology 2490, 2492, 3020, 3040, 3050, 3052, 3053, 3054, 3281, 3290, 4030 and 4300.

Page 159, following the heading Course List delete the note following the course description for Religious Studies 3053.

Page 119, delete the entry for S/A 3242-49 in its entirety.

Amend the entry for S/A 3254-3257. Regional Studies II as follows:

"S/A 3254-3257. Regional Studies. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme)."

Insert the following:

S/A 3242. European Societies. A survey of cultural and social variation in Europe, especially since 1950. Topics covered include micro-level concerns, such as kinship, religiosity, politics, economic and gender relations in small communities, as well as macro-level concerns, such as labour migration, state formation, social movements, and nationalism.

S/A 3249. Peoples of the Pacific. A survey of the peoples, cultures and societies of the islands of the Pacific Ocean. The course will examine a variety of topics, including: the relevance of the environment, the main indigenous cultures and their modern forms, the impact of colonisation and migration, the emergence of nation-states, issues and development, and current economic and political changes occurring in the region.

S/C 3305. The Anthropology of Gender. The aim of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the major research questions that have been addressed by anthropologists concerned with the study of gender. A variety of empirical examples are used to demonstrate the variation in what it means to be 'female' or 'male' across disparate time periods and cultural contexts.

S/A 3318. Culture and Aging. An introduction to the study of aging from a social and cultural perspective. Distinctions between the biological and social elements of the aging process will be examined. The overview of social and cultural gerontology includes social, economic and political influences on later life, as well as the culture-based needs and aspirations of the aged.

A/P 3580. Bronze Age Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean. This course examines the archaeological (material) evidence that underlies the current reconstruction of the Bronze Age in the eastern Mediterranean. In particular, the Bronze Age of the Aegean and the island of Cyprus is essentially prehistoric and inaccessible except through the methods of archaeology. These methods are as diverse as physical dating techniques, geoarchaeology, residue studies, palaeoethnobotany, zooarchaeology, forensic anthropology, underwater archaeology and cultural resource management. Emphasis is placed on the role of Cyprus as a physical and cultural link between peoples of the Aegean and the Near East during the Middle and Late Bronze Age.

A/P 3582. Historical Archaeology. The course will introduce students to historical archaeology, with special reference to the North Atlantic, 1000 to 1900 AD. The archaeology of specific historic sites, including Newfoundland sites, will be examined in order to raise theoretical issues and to give practical examples of methodology. Students will be introduced to the methodological challenges of palaeography, analysis of historic maps, survey, excavation and analysis of complex sites, underwater archaeology, documentary archaeology, material culture and subsistence studies, interpretation, conservation and cultural resource management. The course will consider theoretical approaches including historical anthropology, ethnohistory, world systems and consumer studies.

A/P 3585-3586. Practicum in Archaeology. The practicum offers students practical introductions to archaeological fieldwork (A/P 3585) and laboratory techniques (A/P 3586). These courses provide instruction and experience in site mapping, sampling strategies, the recovery and conservation of archaeological materials (i.e., artifacts and ecofacts) and the cleaning, cataloguing and cultural interpretation of artifacts and features. The students will also receive an introduction to archaeological research concerning prehistoric and/or historic cultures of a selected region.

A/P 4042. Recent Developments in the Study of Human Evolution. During the past decade the discovery of many new hominoid and hominid fossils and their subsequent interpretation has greatly increased our knowledge of human origins and has changed the way we view human evolution. Through directed readings, class presentation and discussion, this seminar will explore these recent discoveries and will examine their impact on our understanding of the physical, behavioral, and intellectual evolution of the human species.

S/A 4070. Aboriginal Self-Governance. An advanced course on contemporary issues on the development of, and barriers to, self-government among Canadian aboriginal peoples. The focus will be on topics such as land claims and claims settlements, self-government agreements and proposed agreements, economic development, environmental and social impact of industrial developments, and cultural and religious revival.

Prerequisite: S/A 3240.

S/A 4073. Studies in Underclass Life. A critical inquiry into the social sources of human misery and suffering that characterize life in the underclass.

S/A 4074. Ritual and Ceremony. This course is about ritual and ceremony, as both analytic and descriptive concepts, in both industrial states and subsistence-oriented societies. Topics examined could include: the universality of ritual and ceremony; essential differences between ritual and ceremony; their relative importance in non-industrialised and industrialised societies; the place of symbolism in ritual and ceremony; and the relationship between ritual, ceremony, religion and the sacred.

Prerequisite: S/A 2350.

S/A 4077. Advanced Studies in Terror and Society. A research seminar for intensive examination of terror in selected societal contexts. The foci will be upon (1) understanding the construction and bases of cultures of violence - whether serving established authorities and institutions or the contrary, and (2) the quest for a non-violent society.

Prerequisite: S/A 3320.

S/C 4081. Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of Gender. This course is a seminar that focuses on the critical analysis of cross-cultural research on gender roles, ideologies, and identities. Each year, particular emphasis is placed on the topics that are the current subject of extensive theoretical enquiry and debate in feminist anthropology.

Prerequisites: S/C 3305 or permission of the instructor.

A/P 4151. Paleoethnobotany. A combined directed readings/laboratory course on palaeoethnobotany. Paleoethnobotany concerns the recovery and analysis of archaeological plant remains as a basis for understanding human and plant interactions in the archaeological record. This course focuses on recent palaeobotanical research in northeastern North America.

Prerequisites: A/P 2480 and the permission of the instructor.

A/P 4182. History of Archaeology. An intensive study of the emergence and maturation of archaeology as a discipline within the social sciences, particularly in Western Europe and North America, during the 19th and 20th centuries.

New Courses

A/P or S/C 3584. Historical Anthropology. This course will explore selected issues in historical anthropology, with special reference to the Mediterranean and North Atlantic worlds. Students will read specific case studies in order to explore the theoretical issues raised by the attempt to understand historically-documented past cultures. In order to give practical examples of methodology classes will analyse primary source material. Students will be introduced to the textual analysis of myth and legal records, to the interpretation of images and to the analysis of patterns in material culture. The course will consider specific current interpretive issues, particularly the rise of individualism, the consumer revolution and the cultural construction of gender.

A/P 3588. Arctic Prehistory. Lectures and discussion will cover cultural developments in the Canadian Arctic, Greenland, and Alaska from the time of initial human occupation to the historic period, with particular emphasis on the eastern Canadian Arctic. Culture history is presented in the context of theoretical and methodological issues and emphasis is placed on culture adaptations to changing environments.

Delete course number "3284-3289" and replace with "S/C 3384-3389".

Delete course number "3315-25 excluding 3316, 3317 and 3320" and replace with "S/A 3330-3339 excluding S/A 3317, S/A 3318 and S/A 3320"

Delete course number "3302-3309" and replace with "S/C 3402-3409 excluding S/C 3305".

Delete course number "3580-3589 excluding 3583 and 3587" and replace with "A/P 3680-3689 excluding A/P 3580, A/P 3582 A/P 3584, A/P 3585-6, A/P 3587 and A/P 3588".

Delete course number "4042-4049" and replace with the following "A/P 4050-4059 (excluding A/P 4042)".

Delete course number "4070-4079 (excluding 4071 and 4072)" and replace with "S/A 4140-4149 (excluding S/A 4070, S/A 4073, S/A 4074, and S/A 4077)".

Delete course number "4150-4159" and replace with "A/P 4160-4169 (excluding A/P 4150 and A/P 4151)".

Delete course number "4180-4189 (excluding 4182, 4183, and 4186)" and replace with "A/P 4190-4199 (excluding A/P 4182)".

Delete course number "4081-4086 (excluding 4084)" and replace with "S/C 4200-4209".

Delete the following course numbers, titles and descriptions for the following courses:

"S/C 3055

S/C 3056

S/C 3059

S/C 3080

S/C 3081

S/A 3258

S/A 3259

S/C 3283

S/C 3480

S/A 3620

S/C 4111

S/C 4112

S/C 4113

S/C 4114"

Amend prerequisite for A/P 4411 to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: A/P 2480 and A/P 4182".

Insert the following:

A/P 4150. Environmental Change and Quaternary Geography (same as Geography 4150). Methods of reconstructing Quaternary environments, effects of Quaternary environmental changes on landform, with special reference to North America, development and characteristics of glacial and non-glacial climates.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Geography 3110, 3150 or permission of Head of Department.

Page 142, following the course number and title for Geography 4150 insert the following:

"(same as A/P 4150)".

Insert "S/C", "A/P" or "S/A" designations before course numbers and titles as follows:

"A/P 1030. Introduction to Archaeology and Physical Anthropology

S/C 1031. Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

S/A 2200. Communities

S/A 2210. Communication and Culture

S/A 2220. Labrador Society and Culture

S/A 2230. Newfoundland Society and Culture

S/A 2240. Canadian Society and Culture

S/A 2260. War and Aggression

S/A 2270. Families

S/A 2280. The City

S/C 2300. Newfoundland Folklore

S/A 2350. Religious Institutions

S/C 2410. Classics in Social and Cultural Anthropology

S/C 2411. Anthropologists in the Field

S/C 2412. Threatened Peoples

S/C 2413. Modern World Cultures

A/P 2430. Physical Anthropology: The Human Animal

A/P 2480. Archaeology: Discovering our Past

A/P 2490. Human Origins

A/P 2491. Popular Archaeology

A/P 2492. Forensic Anthropology

S/C 2500. Folk Literature

A/P 3020. What is Human?

A/P 3040. The Human Skeleton

S/C 3050. Ecology and Culture

S/C 3052. Anthropology and Directed Social Change

S/C 3053. Anthropology of Religion

S/C 3054. Play and Culture

S/C 3058. Urban Anthropology

S/C 3060. The Idea of Culture

S/C 3061. Culture and Social Inequality

S/C 3062. Anthropology in Social Policy-making

S/C 3063. Ethnicity and Culture

S/C 3064. Anthropology and the Study of Society

S/C 3082. Bandits, Rebels, and Revolutions

S/C 3083. Cultural Crises and the Environment

S/A 3100. Dominance and Power

S/A 3140. Social Movements

S/A 3210. Persistence and Change in Rural Society

S/A 3220. Work and Society

S/A 3240. Regional Studies: Contemporary Native Peoples of Canada

S/A 3241. Regional Studies. The Atlantic

S/A 3242. European Societies

S/A 3249. Peoples of the Pacific

S/A 3254-57. Regional Studies

S/A 3260. Social and Economic Development

S/C 3280. Regional Studies: The Arctic

S/C 3281. Regional Studies: North American First Peoples

A/P 3290. Newfoundland and Labrador Prehistory

A/P 3291. Maritime Provinces Prehistory

S/C 3305. The Anthropology of Gender

S/A 3314. Gender and Society

S/A 3317. Oil and Society

S/A 3318. Culture and Aging

S/A 3320. Terrorism and Society

S/A 3330-3339. Interdisciplinary Specialities

S/C 3384-3389. Regional Studies in Anthropology

S/C 3402-3409. Anthropological Specialties

A/P 3500. Prehistory of Africa, Asia and Europe I

A/P 3505. Prehistory of Africa, Asia and Europe II

A/P 3510. Prehistory of the New World

A/P 3515. Prehistory of Mesoamerica

A/P 3520. The Early Ethnohistory of North America's Native People

A/P 3525. The Later Ethnohistory of North America's Native People

A/P 3561. Ethnoarchaeology

A/P 3580. Bronze Age Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean

A/P 3582. Historical Archaeology

A/P or S/C 3584. Historical Anthropology

A/P 3585-3586. Practicum in Archaeology

A/P 3587. Archaeological Conservation: Method and Theory

A/P 3588. Arctic Prehistory

A/P or S/C 3590. Hunter-Gatherer Studies

S/A 3600. The Use of Theory in Sociology and Anthropology

S/A 3610. Society and the Life Cycle

S/A 3630. New Media Methods in Social Research

A/P 3680-89. Studies in Archaeology and Prehistory

S/A 3700. Social and Cultural Change

A/P 3850. Material Culture

A/P 3860. Vernacular Architecture

S/A 4000. Society and Culture

A/P 4042. Recent Developments in the Study of Human Evolution

S/C 4030. Taboo and Law

A/P 4041. Palaeopathology

A/P 4050-4059. Special Projects in Physical Anthropology

S/A 4071. Social and Cultural Aspects of Health and Illness

S/A 4070. Aboriginal Self Governance

S/A 4072. Social and Cultural Aspects of Death

S/A 4073. Studies in Underclass Life

S/A 4074. Ritual and Ceremony

S/A 4077. Advanced Studies in Terror and Society

S/C 4081. Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of Gender

S/A 4089. Language and Social Change

S/A 4091. Oil and Development

S/A 4092. Gender and Social Theory

S/A 4110. Personality and Culture

S/A 4140-4149. Advanced Interdisciplinary Specialties

A/P 4150. Environmental Change and Quaternary Geography

A/P 4151. Palaeothnobotany

A/P 4160-4169. Special Projects in Archaeology

A/P 4170. Settlement and Subsistence Studies in Archaeology

A/P 4182. History of Archaeology

A/P 4190-4199. Selected Topics in Archaeology and Prehistory

S/C 4200-4209. Special Areas in Anthropology

S/C 4280. Advanced Newfoundland Ethnography

S/C 4300. Fieldwork and the Interpretation of Culture

S/C 4301. The Intensive Study of One Culture

S/C 4302. Biography and Culture

S/C 4370. Culture and Traditions of Ireland

S/C 4410. History of Social and Cultural Anthropology

A/P 4411. Theory and Method in Archaeology and Prehistory

S/C 4412. Modern Culture Theory

S/C 4422. The Craft of Writing Anthropological Narrative

S/C 4440. Music and Culture

S/C 4450. Land Tenure and Culture

S/C 4451. Ethnography of Gambling

S/C 4452. The Fisheries Revolution

A/P 4500. Special Topic in Historical Archaeology

S/A 4990. S/A Honours Essay

S/A 4991. S/A Comprehensive Examination

A/P or S/C 4995. Honours Essay

A/P or S/C 4996. Comprehensive Examination"

63.17 Department of Sociology

Page 162, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Course List delete the following list of courses in their entirety:

"S/A 3242-3249

S/A 3258

S/A 3259

S/A 3315-3325 excluding...

S/A 3620

S/A 4070-79 excluding"

Following the course description for S/A 3630 delete the note in its entirety.

New Entries

S/A 3242. European Societies. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

S/A 3249. Peoples of the Pacific. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

S/A 3318. Culture and Aging. (See Sociology/Anthropology Indepartmental Studies Programme).





S/A 4070. Aboriginal Self-Governance. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

S/A 4073. Studies in Underclass Life. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

S/A 4074. Ritual and Ceremony. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

S/A 4077. Advanced Studies in Terror and Society. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

S/A 3330-3339. Interdisciplinary Specialities. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

S/A 4140-4149. Advanced Interdisciplinary Specialities. (See Sociology/Anthropology Interdepartmental Studies Programme).

Following the course number and title for S/A 3254-3257 delete the following:

"II".

63.18 Department of Biochemistry

Page 190, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Nutrition Programme, sub-heading Honours Degree in Nutrition amend Clause b) to read as follows:

"b) six additional credit hours chosen from Biochemistry 3105, 4101, 4103, 4104, 4200, 4201, 4210, 4211, 4220, 4400."

Page 191, following the heading Course List delete prerequisite note for Biochemistry 3201 and replace with the following:

"Corequisite or prerequisite: Biochemistry 3106 or Pharmacy 3111."

Delete the fourth sentence of the course description for Biochemistry 4999.

63.19 Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Page 209, 1996-97 Calendar insert the following at the end of the course description for Mathematics 2090:

", contingent payments"

Page 207, following the heading Honours in Applied Mathematics (B.Sc. only) amend Clause c) to read as follows:

"c) Physics 1050 and 1054 (or Physics 1020, 1021, and 1054), Physics 3220, and Physics 3230."

Following the heading Major in Applied Mathematics (B.Sc. only) amend Clause c) to read as follows:

"c) Physics 1050 and 1054 (or Physics 1020, 1021, and 1054)."

New Course

2091. Introduction to Actuarial Mathematics. Life tables, life annuities, life insurance, multi-life theory, stationary population, interest rates as a random variable.

Prerequisites: M 2090 and one of ST 2500, 2510, 2550.

63.20 Department of Biology

Page 195, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Course List amend course descriptions for Biology 3709, 4270 and 4810 to read as follows:

"3709. Field Course in Marine Principles and Techniques. The course begins with a two-week field school immediately prior to the beginning of the Fall Semester. In the Fall Semester there are follow-up lectures, readings and submission of reports. The course is designed to introduce the principal marine environments, organisms and techniques. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken before either Biology 3710, 3711 or 4810. May be taken only with the permission of the Head of Department.

Prerequisites: Biology 2010, 2122, 2210, 2600; Statistics 2550.

4270. History of Biology. Consideration of ... and cultural environment. This course will normally require students to make verbal presentation to the class, participate in discussion and submit written papers. May be taken only with the permission of the Instructor.

Three hours of lecture plus one three-hour seminar per week.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 90 credit hours overall including a minimum of nine credit hours from any of Biology 2010, 2122, 2210, 2600 and including a minimum of six credit hours in Biology at the 3000 level or above, plus the permission of the Instructor.

4810. Research. Field Course in Marine Biology. The course will consist of an intensive two-week field school designed to acquaint students with marine field research, experimental design, methodology and data analysis. Emphasis will be placed on individual projects. Projects must be designed and approved prior to the commencement of the course and will involve a written report. May be taken only with permission of the Head of Department. At the discretion of the Head of Department, another recognized field course may be substituted for Biology 4810.

Prerequisites: Biology 2010, 2210, 2122, 3710.

It is strongly recommended that students take Biology 3709 before 4810."

63.21 Department of Earth Sciences

Page 205, 1996-97 Calendar following the course description for Earth Sciences 4160 delete the prerequisite note and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 3179."

Following the course description for Earth Sciences 4171 delete the prerequisite note and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 3170 and Earth Sciences 4179."

Following the course description for Earth Sciences 4173 delete the prerequisite note and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 3170 or Earth Sciences 3172."

Following the course description for Earth Sciences 4179 delete the prerequisite note and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 3179."

63.22 Department of Psychology

Page 215, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Psychology, sub-heading Programmes in Psychology delete first paragraph and replace with the following:

"The following undergraduate programmes are available in the Department.

- Major and Honours in Psychology (B.A. or B.Sc.)

- Major and Honours in Behavioural Neuroscience (B.Sc. only)

- Minor in Psychology (B.A. or B.Sc.)

- Joint Honours in Psychology and Biology (B.Sc. Hons. only)

- Joint Honours in Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience) and Biology (B.Sc. Hons. only)

- Joint Honours in Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience) and Biochemistry (B.Sc. Hons. only)

- Joint Honours in Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience) and Biochemistry (Nutrition) (B.Sc. Hons. only)

- Diploma in Behaviour Modification with Problem Children

Details of the joint honours programmes are given under the Degree Regulations of the Faculty of Science."

Following the heading Admission to Major and Minor Programmes delete the current entry and replace with the following:

"Admission to the Major and Minor programmes in the Department of Psychology is competitive and selective. Students who wish to enter these programmes must submit a "Declaration/Change of Academic Programme" form to the Psychology Department by June 1 for Fall Semester registration and by October 1 for Winter Semester. To be eligible for admission, students must have completed the 24 credit hours as listed below with an average of at least 65% in Psychology 1000/1001 and an overall average of at least 60% in Psychology, English, and Mathematics:

a. Psychology 1000, 1001

b. English 1080 and one of 1101, 1102, 1103, or 1110, or equivalents.

c. Mathematics 1000 or two of 1080, 1081, 1050, 1051.

d. Six credit hours of electives (nine if Mathematics 1000 is completed).

Students who fulfil the eligibility requirements compete for a limited number of available spaces. Selection is based on academic performance. For students who have earned fewer than forty-eight credit hours, academic performance is determined by the average of grades in the Psychology, English, and Mathematics courses specified above. For students who have earned forty-eight credit hours or more, academic performance is determined by the highest of the following: the average of grades in the Psychology, English, and Mathematics courses specified above, cumulative average, or the average of grades in the last ten courses completed. Applicants will be informed in writing whether or not they have been accepted within two weeks after the final date for filing applications."

Page 216, following the heading Requirements for a Major in Behavioural Neuroscience (B.Sc. only), Clause 2 amend f) to read as follows:

"f) Three credit hours of Computer Science"

Following the heading Requirements for a Major in Behavioural Neuroscience (B.Sc. only), Clause 3 amend the list of Biochemistry courses to read as follows:

"- Biochemistry: Any 2000-, 3000-, or 4000-level course except 2000, 2010, 2011, 3402, 4302, or 4400."

Delete the course numbers, titles, and descriptions for Psychology 3350 and 3610.

Page 219, following the course description for Psychology 2450 delete the credit restriction note.

New Course

3577. Programme Evaluation. Programme evaluation methods are used to assess needs, monitor operations, and evaluate outcomes and impacts of programmes providing human services, such as training programmes, health programmes, counselling programmes, education programmes, and social assistance programmes. This course will include an examination of the following topics: programme evaluation approaches; psychological principles used in programme evaluation methodologies; the design of questions and questionnaires; the use of experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental methods to measure outcomes; the use of qualitative methods such as interviews, focus groups, case studies, diaries, and observation, and how to choose the most appropriate method and approach for a study.

Prerequisite: Any 2000-level Psychology course.

63.23 Department of Biochemistry

Page 189, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Biochemistry sub-heading Programmes add the following programmes:

"Joint Honours in Biochemistry and Physics

Joint Honours in Biochemistry (Nutrition)/Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience)

Joint Honours in Biochemistry/Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience)"

Following the heading Biochemistry Programme delete the sub-heading "General Degree in Biochemistry" and replace with the following:

"Major in Biochemistry".

Page 190, following the heading Nutrition Programme delete sub-heading "General Degree in Nutrition" and replace with the following:

"Major in Nutrition".

Following the heading Nutrition Programme, sub-heading "General Degree in Nutrition amend clause a) of the second paragraph by deleting "3401" and replacing with "3052".

Page 191, delete the heading "General Degree in Dietetics" and replace with the following:

"Major in Dietetics".

Following the heading General Degree in Dietetics, sub-heading Required courses at Memorial amend clause a) by deleting "3401" and replacing with "3052".

Following the heading Honours Degree in Dietetics amend Clause c) to read as follows:

"c) Computer Science 2650"

Following the course description for Biochemistry 2100 delete the prerequisite note and replace with the following:

"Prerequisites or corequisites: Biochemistry 2101, Chemistry 2401, Physics 1021 or 1054. Students may replace the corequisite Chemistry 2401 with Chemistry 2440 as a prerequisite. Chemistry 2440 may not be taken as a corequisite of 2100."

Following the course description for Biochemistry 2101 delete "Physics 1201 and 1052" and replace with "Physics 1021 and 1054" respectively.

Following the course description for Biochemistry 3105 replace existing prerequisite Physics courses 1052 and 2050 with "1054".

Following the course description for Biochemistry 3107 add the following to the prerequisite note:

"or Biology 3250".

Following the course description for Biochemistry 311A/B delete the prerequisite or corequisite note and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite or Corequisite: Biochemistry 2101".

Following the course description for Biochemistry 3200 delete the prerequisite or corequisite note and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite or Corequisite: Biochemistry 2101 or Pharmacy 3110."

63.24 Departments of Physics and Computer Science

Page 189, 1996-97 Calendar amend the entry Joint Major in Computer Science and Physics to read as follows:

"Joint Major in Computer Science and Physics

1) Chemistry 1000 and 1001 or equivalents.

Departments of Physics and Computer Science

2) Thirty-nine credit hours in Computer Science are required for the Joint Major: 1700, 2710, 2711, 2740, 2741, 3711, 3714, 3724, 3725, 3731, 3740, 4718, and 4721.

3) Physics 1050 and 1054 (or 1020, 1021 and 1054) plus at least 30 additional credit hours in Physics including 2053, 2054, 2055, 2056, 3220, 3400, 3500, 3550, 3750 and 3900.

4) a) Mathematics 1000 and 1001 or Mathematics 1080, 1081 and 1001.

b) Mathematics 2000, Statistics 2510 and AM/PM 3260.

c) Physics 3810 or AM/PM 3202."

63.25 Department of Chemistry

Page 198, 1996-97 Calendar following the course description for Chemistry 2300 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: Chemistry 1001, Mathematics 1001, Physics 1054 or 1021".

Following the course description for Chemistry 3211 amend the prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: Chemistry 2210 and 2300."

Amend course titles and descriptions for Chemistry 3401 and 4410 to read as follows:

"3401. Principles of Synthetic Organic Chemistry (W). Based on a knowledge of all the organic reactions covered in Chemistry 2400, 2401 and 3400, this course will concentrate on the fundamentals of organic synthesis: methods, strategy and execution.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3400.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

4410. Advanced Organic Synthesis (F). Topics include a thorough examination of carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, with particular emphasis on chiral aldol reactions and pericyclic reactions; synthetic applications of photochemistry; radical methods; and the use of enzymes in organic synthesis.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3401.

Lectures: Three hour per week."

Following the course description for Chemistry 4411 amend prerequisite note to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: EITHER Chemistry 3401; OR Chemistry 3400 and Biochemistry 2101. Permission may be given to take Chemistry 3401 and Chemistry 4411 concurrently for students who have not completed Biochemistry 2101."

63.26 Department of Computer Science

Page 202, 1996-97 Calendar delete the entry for Computer Science 4740.

New Course

4742. Computational Complexity (F). This course is an in-depth discussion of computational complexity theory. Topics covered in the course include: models of computation (for both serial and parallel computations); complexity measures; reducibility; complexity classes (NP, PSPACE, NC, LOGSPACE and P); and randomized computations.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 3711 and 3740.

Page 201, following the course title for Computer Science 3711 delete the first sentence and replace with the following:

"This course introduces the most common and effective algorithm design techniques (e.g. divide and conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms). The theory of NP - completeness is also discussed."

Delete "VLIV", "Superscarlar" and "Systolic" from the course description Computer Science 3725 and replace with "VLIW", "superscalar" and "systolic" respectively.

Amend a previous amendment approved at a meeting of Senate held September 10, 1996 by adding the following prerequisite note to Computer Science 2650:

"Prerequisite: Mathematics 1080 or Mathematics 1000."

Following the headings Major in Computer Science and Honours in Computer Science amend note 2 by replacing "Statistics 2511" with "Statistics 2560" and replacing "Business 2100" with "Business 1101".

Amend the course description of Computer Science 3740 to read as follows:

"3740. Abstract Machines, Languages and Computations. This course provides an introduction to formal languages, formal grammars and computations. The topics include regular languages, regular expressions, deterministic and nondeterministic finite automata, formal grammars, Chomsky hierarchy, context-free grammars and languages, ambiguity, pushdown automata, Turing machines, recursive and recursively enumerable languages, Church-Turing thesis, and the concept of algorithm, universal Turing machines, decidability, reducibility.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 2711 and 2741."

63.27 Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography

Page 213, 1996-97 Calendar delete the last two sentences for Physics and Physical Oceanography 1020, 1021, and 1050 to read as follows:

"Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratories: Normally six three-hour sessions per semester.

Tutorials: Optional tutorials will be available, on average one hour per week."

63.28 Department of Biology

New Course

3053. Microbiology for Nurses. The fundamentals of microbiology with an emphasis on medical microbiology. The course will include topics such as: host responses to infections, human diseases caused by microorganisms, and the control and exploitation of microorganisms. Entrance is restricted to Nursing students in the Collaborative B.N. programme.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

Laboratories: Two hours per week.

Note: Biology 3053 is not acceptable as one of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programmes in Biology, nor is it acceptable for any of the joint programmes between Biology and other disciplines."

63.29 Department of Chemistry

Page 185, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Chemistry/Biochemistry Joint Honours amend Clause a) by replacing "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents."

Page 187, following the heading Earth Sciences/Chemistry Joint Honours amend Clause a) by replacing "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents."

Following the heading Applied Mathematics/Chemistry Joint Honours (B.Sc. ONLY) delete "In addition to Chemistry 1000 and 1001 or their equivalents,..." in the second sentence and replace with the following:

"In addition, Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents, ...".

Page 188, following the heading Physics /Chemistry Joint Honours amend Clause e) by deleting "Chemistry 1000 and 1001 or equivalents..." with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents,...".

Page 197, following the heading Faculty Advisors amend the note to read as follows:

"Note: Students who have obtained a grade of 3 or better on the Advanced Placement courses in Chemistry will normally be eligible for direct entry into Chemistry 1031 or second year courses. Such students must consult the department before registration."

Following the heading Minor in Chemistry delete the words "Chemistry 1000, 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents,..."

Following the heading General Degree-Major in Chemistry amend Clause a) by deleting "Chemistry 1000, 1001" and replacing with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents, ...".

Amend first sentence of third paragraph by deleting Chemistry 1000, 1001" with the following:

"Chemistry 1050, 1051 (or their equivalents)."

Amend the second sentence of the third paragraph by deleting "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replacing with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 or their equivalents,..."

Following the heading Honours Degree in Chemistry, sub-heading Required Courses amend Clause a) by deleting "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replacing with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents,..."

Following the heading Honours Degree in Chemistry, sub-heading Required Courses amend clause b) in paragraph seven starting "Prospective Honours students in Chemistry..." to read as follows:

"b) Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1010, 1011 and 1031) or their equivalents."

Amend the note after paragraph eight to read as follows:

"NOTE: Students completing first year requirements for any of Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics via the three course options (i.e. Chemistry 1010, 1011, 1031 (or 1800, 1200, 1001), Mathematics 1080, 1081, 1001, Physics 1020, 1021, 1054) instead of the two course options (Chemistry 1050, 1051, Mathematics 1000, 1001, Physics 1050, 1054) will require the corresponding number of extra credits to obtain an Honours degree."

Page 198, insert the following before the heading Course List:

"COURSE RESTRICTIONS

Credit will be given for no more than one of Chemistry 1000, 1010, 1050, 1200, 150A/B, no more than one of Chemistry 1001, 1031, 1051, 150A/B, and no more than one of Chemistry 1001, 1011, 1051, 150A/B."

Following the heading Course List delete course numbers, titles and descriptions for Chemistry 1000, 1001, 1200, 1800 and replace with the following:

"1010 (F) and 1011 (W). Introductory Chemistry I and II. Descriptive chemistry; atomic structure; chemical bonding; periodicity illustrated by the chemistry of selected elements; mole concept and stoichiometry; physical properties of matter; energetics; rates of reaction; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 1011.

Lectures: Four hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hour per week.

1031. Introductory Chemistry III (F/S). This course prepares students who have completed Chemistry 1010 and 1011 for Chemistry 2210, 2300 and 2400. It augments the topics covered in Chemistry 1010 and 1011 with the greater depth and problem solving emphasis of Chemistry 1050 and 1051.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1011 and Mathematics 1000 or 1080.

Lectures: Four hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

1050 (F) and 1051 (W). General Chemistry I and II. The topics will be similar to 1010/1011 but will be treated in greater depth with an emphasis on problem solving.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1000 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 1050, but may be taken concurrently. Chemistry 1050 and Mathematics 1000 are prerequisites for Chemistry 1051.

Lectures: Four hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

Notes: 1) For entry to Chemistry 1050 students must have (i) achieved at least 80% in high school Chemistry 3202 and (ii) successfully completed high school Advanced Mathematics 3201, or achieved a pass in any non-foundation university level mathematics course.

2) Other students, including those with no high school chemistry background, will take Chemistry 1010. It is recommended that students have at least 70% in high school Academic Mathematics 3203, or a pass in any university level mathematics course.

3) Only six science credit hours will be awarded for a major or honours in Chemistry from the following course groups: Chemistry 1010/1011/1031, or Chemistry 1800/1200/1001 (Sir Wilfred Grenfell College)."

Amend prerequisite note for Chemistry 2210 to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: Chemistry 1051 (or 1001 or 1031), Mathematics 1000 or 1081."

Amend prerequisite note for Chemistry 2300 to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: Chemistry 1051 (or 1001 or 1031), Mathematics 1001, Physics 1054 or 1021."

Amend prerequisite note for Chemistry 2400 and 2401 to read as follows:

"Prerequisites: Chemistry 1051 or 1031, or a grade of 80% or better in each of Chemistry 1010 and 1011 or a grade of 85% or better in Chemistry 1011, or a grade of 65% or better in Chemistry 1001. Chemistry 2400 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 2401."

Amend prerequisite note for Chemistry 2420 to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 (or 1001 or 1051)."

Amend prerequisite note for Chemistry 2440 to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 (or 1001 or 1051)."

Amend prerequisite note for Chemistry 2600 to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 (or 1001 or 1051)."

Amend prerequisite note for Chemistry 2601 to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 (or 1001 or 1051)."

63.30 Department of Physics

Page 185, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Physics/Biochemistry Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)".

Page 187, following the heading Computer Science/Physics Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalent)".

Following the heading Earth Sciences/Physics Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or equivalent)".

Page 188, following the heading Applied Mathematics/Physics Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001 or equivalents" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)."

Following the heading Physics/Chemistry Joint Honours, Clause e) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001 or equivalents" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)."

Page 189, following the heading Joint Major in Computer Science/Physics, Clause 1) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001 or equivalent" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)."

Following the heading Joint Major in Earth Sciences/Physics, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or equivalent)".

Page 213, following the headings Major in Physics and Honours in Physics delete clause b) under each heading and replace with the following:

"b) Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)."

63.31 Department of Biochemistry

Page 191, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Course List amend the prerequisite note for Physics 3107 to read as follows:

"Prerequisite: Biochemistry 2101; and Biochemistry 2100 or Biology 3250."

Page 185, following the heading Joint Programmes, sub-heading Biochemistry (Nutrition)/Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience) Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalent)".

Following the heading Joint Programmes, sub-heading Biochemistry/Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience) Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)"

Following the heading Joint Programmes, sub-heading Physics/Biochemistry Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)".

Following the heading Joint Programmes, sub-heading Chemistry/

Biochemistry Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)".

Following the heading Joint Programmes, sub-heading Joint Honours in Cell Biology/Microbiology and Biochemistry delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" from the first sentence and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or equivalents)".

Page 189, following the heading Biochemistry Programme, sub-heading General Degree in Biochemistry delete the last sentence of the first paragraph and replace with the following:

"In addition, students must be eligible for entry to Chemistry 2400."

Following the heading Biochemistry Programme, sub-heading General Degree in Biochemistry delete Clause b) and replace with the following:

"b) Chemistry 1050, 1051 (or Chemistry 1010, 1011)"

Following the heading Biochemistry Programme, sub-heading General Degree in Biochemistry insert new clause h):

"h) Chemistry 1031 for those students who have completed Chemistry 1010 and 1011."

Page 190, following the heading Nutrition Programme, sub-heading General Degree in Nutrition delete "and an average of at least 65% in Chemistry 1000/1001" from the second sentence in the first paragraph and insert the following new third sentence:

"In addition, students must be eligible for entry to Chemistry 2400."

Following the heading Nutrition Programme, sub-heading General Degree in Nutrition delete the first Clause b) and replace with the following:

"b) Chemistry 1050, 1051 (or Chemistry 1010, 1011)"

Following the heading Nutrition Programme, sub-heading General Degree in Nutrition insert new clause f) following the words "Required course to complete the major":

"f) Chemistry 1031 for those students who have completed Chemistry 1010 and 1011."

Following the heading Professional Programme in Dietetics, sub-heading Admission to Dietetics delete "Chemistry 1000, 1001" from the fourth paragraph and replace with the following:

"- Chemistry 1050, 1051 (or Chemistry 1010, 1011, 1031)".

Page 191, following the heading Course List delete the prerequisite note for Biochemistry 1430 and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Level 3 Chemistry or Chemistry 1010".

Delete the prerequisite note for Biochemistry 2000 and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Chemistry 1031 or 1051".

Delete the prerequisite note for Biochemistry 2010 and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 or 1051".

Delete the prerequisite note for Biochemistry 2011 and replace with the following:

"Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 or 1051; Biochemistry 2010".

63.32 Department of Biology

Page 186, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Biology and Earth Sciences Joint Honours, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or 1050 and 1051)".

Following the heading Joint Honours in Biology/Psychology (B.Sc. only), Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or 1050 and 1051)".

Following the heading Statistics/Biology Joint Honours (B.Sc. only), Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or 1050 and 1051)".

Page 193, following the heading Entrance Requirements delete "Chemistry 1000/1001" following the second paragraph and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010/1011 or Chemistry 1050/1051"

Delete "Chemistry 1000/1001" from the third paragraph and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010/1011 (or 1050/1051)".

Following the heading General Degree - Major in Biology delete the third requirement of paragraph three and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010/1011 (or 1050/1051), 2440"

Page 194, delete the prerequisite note for Biology 2010 and replace with the following:

"Prerequisites: Biology 1002, Chemistry 1011 (or 1051)".

Delete the prerequisite note for Biology 3710 and replace with the following:

"Prerequisites: Physics 1021 or 1054; Chemistry 1011 or 1051; Biology 2600 as prerequisite or corequisite."

63.33 Department of Geography

Page 140, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Major in Geography (B.A. or B.Sc.), Clause 3) b) delete line four and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or Chemistry 1010 and 1011)."

63.34 Department of Earth Sciences

Page 187, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Joint Honours in Geography/Earth Sciences (B.Sc. only), Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 or equivalent."

Page 202, following the heading Major Programmes in Earth Sciences, sub-heading Common Block of Required Courses, Clause a) delete "Chemistry 1000 and 1001" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 or equivalent".

63.35 Department of Biology

Page 193, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading General Degree - Major in Biology amend the sentence before the note to read as follows:

"It is recommended (but not required) that a Computer Science course be included and the Biology Department strongly recommends Computer Science 2650."

Following the heading Entrance Requirements following paragraph two delete "Physics 1200/1201 or Physics 1050/1052" from the third line and replace with the following:

"Physics 1020/1021 or Physics 1050/1054".

Page 196, following the course description for Biology 4600 delete the following:

"(Not offered in 1993/94)".

Page 193, following the heading Honours in Cell Biology/Microbiology delete the following from the second paragraph:

"- Biochemistry 3102".

63.36 Department of Psychology

Amendment to a previous amendment approved at a Senate meeting held November 12, 1996.

Following the heading Biology/Psychology Joint Honours delete "Chemistry 1000, 1001 and 2440" from Clause 4 and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or 1050 and 1051), and 2440;"

Amend Clause 5 to read as follows:

"Other courses, if necessary, to complete at least 120 credit hours of courses; a course in Computer Science is strongly recommended."

Following the heading Biology/Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience) Joint Honours delete "Chemistry 1000, 1001, and 2440" and replace with the following:

"Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or 1050 and 1051), and 2440 (or 2400 and 2401);"

Amend Clause 6 to read as follows:

"Other courses, if necessary, to complete at least 120 credit hours of courses."

Page 216, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Requirement for a Major in Psychology amend Clause 2 (c) to read as follows:

"(c) Either Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or 1050 and 1051); OR Physics 1020 (or 1050) and 1021 (or 1054)."

Following the heading Requirement for a Major in Behavioural Neuroscience amend Clause 2 (b) to read as follows:

"(b) Chemistry 1010 and 1011 (or 1050 and 1051), and 2440 (or 2400/2401)."

63.37 Department of Computer Science

Page 201, 1996-97 Calendar amend course description for 3714 to read as follows:

"3714. Programming Languages and their Processors (F) & (W). This course reviews typical elements of (imperative) programming languages, and then discusses language implementations in the form of compilers and interpreters. The topics include specification of syntax and semantics of programming languages, discussion of expressions and assignments, side effects, control structures, data and procedural abstractions, parameter passing mechanisms, bindings, scopes, and type systems. The recursive-descent technique is used for illustrations of different aspects of syntax analysis, code generation and error recovery. Language interpreters are discussed for both low-level and high-level languages."

63.38 Marine Institute - Bachelor of Maritime Studies

Page 67, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Bachelor of Maritime Studies replace all references to "Economics 4360" with "Economics 3360".

Following the heading 1. Admission Requirements insert new clause e) to read as follows:

"e) Applicants who have Canadian Forces (Naval Operations) training of a type and at a level acceptable to the Admissions Committee may be admitted to the programme and will follow a specific course of study."

Page 68, following the heading Degree Regulations delete the introductory paragraph and all material under a) and b) and the line which reads "c) Plus the ....degree requirements:" and replace with the following:

"To be awarded a Bachelor of Maritime Studies a candidate shall have successfully completed either a Diploma in Nautical Science or Diploma in Marine Engineering Technology, the specific requirements for which are as approved by the Marine Institute Academic Council and documented in the Marine Institute calendar. In addition candidates must complete the following courses."

Delete Notes 2) and 3) and amend note 1) to read as follows:

"Notes: a) Course descriptions for the Marine Institute courses may be found in the Marine Institute Calendar. Descriptions for courses elsewhere in the University may be found in appropriate sections of the university calendar.

b) Candidates admitted under clause 1 (b) who completed the appropriate diploma prior to 1993 or under clauses 1(c), 1(d), or 1(e), shall have their qualifications adjudicated and a programme of study developed for them to complete."

Report of the Academic Council of the School of Graduate Studies

63.39 Department of Linguistics

Page 402 and 427, following the heading Linguistics, sub-heading Courses amend the title of Linguistics 7000 to read as follows:

"Seminar in Research Methods".

Page 427, following the heading Linguistics, sub-heading Doctor of Philosophy amend first sentence and a) and b) of Clause 6 to read as follows:

"6. The comprehensive examination (see Regulation H.2. of the General Regulations) includes two written and two oral examinations. Students must meet all language requirements prior to undertaking their comprehensive examination.

a) The written examinations consist of two separate research papers. These papers will be submitted to the Examination Committee. At least one of the papers must be in one of the course areas of phonology, morphology, syntax or semantics. The topic selected for each paper must obtain the prior approval of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department. In each of these papers, candidates must demonstrate knowledge of the literature on the topic selected, general mastery of the discipline of linguistics, and ability to undertake independent research.

b) The Examination Committee will examine the candidate orally, on each paper, within one month of submission. Questioning can be as wide-ranging as the committee deems necessary to ensure that the student displays a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of the area in question.

Delete Clauses 7, 8, and 9 and insert new clause 7 and 8 to read as follows:

"7. Initially, candidates must obtain approval for their Ph.D. thesis topics from the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department, in consultation with the Supervisory Committee. The thesis topic is normally selected before the end of the second full year in the programme. Once the topic is approved, a more detailed thesis proposal must be presented to the Department in both written and oral format, and must receive formal departmental approval prior to the writing of the thesis.

8. Proficiency in a language other than the candidate's first language will be required, as demonstrated by a minimum B grade in a second-year language course, or performance satisfactory to the department in an arranged reading proficiency test. A structural knowledge of a non-Indo-European language is also required, as demonstrated by a minimum B grade in a field methods/language structure course, or other performance satisfactory to the department. Depending on the programme, a reading knowledge of one or more additional languages may be required. Students must meet all language requirements before undertaking their comprehensive examinations."

63.40 Faculty of Medicine

Page 412, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Medicine, sub-heading Courses delete the following courses and titles:

"6060 Biochemistry of Steroid Hormones

6130 Experimental Surgery

6170 Health Care Delivery I

6171 Health Care Delivery II

6210 Immunogenetics

6260 Sociology in Medicine (Sociology 6240)

6350 Developmental Immunology

6360 Host Resistance and its Defects

6430 Seminars on the Sociology and Politics of Health Organizations

6460 Nutrition and Immunity

6480 Food Intolerance

6490 Human Biochemical Genetics

6500 Research Topics in Biochemical Genetics

6510 Clinical Biochemistry of Lipoproteins

6530 Histology

6593 Selected Readings in Molecular Biology"

Amend the title of Medicine 6200, 6220, 6270 and 6340 to read as follows:

"6200. Biostatistics I

6220. Introduction to Community Health

6270. Epidemiology I

6340. Research Topics in Cancer I"

New Courses

6280. Community Health Research Methods

6341 Research Topics in Cancer II

6342 Basic Principles of the Pathology of Cancer

6400 Research Seminars for Master's Students I

6401 Research Seminars for Master's Students II

6402 Research Seminars for Master's Students III

6403 Research Seminars for Master's Students IV

6410 Research Seminars for PhD Students I

6411 Research Seminars for PhD Students II

6412 Research Seminars for PhD Students III

6413 Research Seminars for PhD Students IV"

It was agreed that item 4B(2) be tabled until further information is obtained.

Dean Kealey agreed to obtain the necessary information and report back at the next meeting.

63.41 Department of Computer Science

Page 409, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Computer Science, sub-heading A) Master of Science add the following sentence at the end of Clause 1 to read as follows:

"All applicants are required to submit results of the (general) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test."

Page 421, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Computer Science, sub-heading Doctor of Philosophy add the following sentence at the end of Clause 1 to read as follows:

"All applicants are required to submit results of the (general) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test."

63.42 Department of Biochemistry

Page 407, 1996-97 Calendar, following the heading Biochemistry, paragraph 6 delete last sentence of second paragraph as follows:

"At the student's...submitted instead."

63.43 Department of Geography

Page 386, 1996-97 Calendar following the heading Geography delete regulation 7 in its entirety.

Page 411, following the heading Geography delete regulation 7 in its entirety.

64. Special Meeting of Senate to Discuss

A. Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on First Year Mathematics Courses

B. Report of the Senate ad hoc Committee on the Teaching of Writing

A memorandum dated January 30, 1997 was received from the Executive Committee of Senate recommending that, because of the substantial nature of these two reports, they should be the subject of a special meeting of Senate.

Following consideration, it was agreed that in lieu of the special meeting of Senate scheduled to be held at the March meeting, the regular meeting of Senate on March 11, 1997 will be devoted to the consideration of the two Reports, and that if necessary, any normal business of Senate would be carried over to the April 8, 1997 meeting of Senate.

65. Report of the Senate Elections Committee

A memorandum dated January 29, 1997 was received from the Committee on Senate Elections reporting the entitlement of each constituency to seats on Senate for the 1997-98 academic year, in accordance with the procedures for election of Senate members.

66. Availability of Resources for New Programmes

A memorandum dated January 30, 1997 was received from the Executive Committee of Senate recommending to Senate that the mandate of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies be expanded to include the consideration of availability of resources, and that the Committee on Committees be instructed to provide revised Terms of Reference for the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

This recommendation was made by the Executive Committee of Senate following consideration of a memorandum dated January 22, 1997, from the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies expressing concern that, while recognizing that the allocation of resources for new programmes is not within its mandate, the Committee has concerns with regard to the possible negative implications for existing programmes when resources that are already limited are allocated to new programmes.

Dr. Treslan, Chair of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies Committee, advised Senate that his Committee has discussed the recommendation of the Executive Committee of Senate and is against the proposal to amend the Terms of Reference of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, since it does not feel that it has sufficient knowledge to judge the adequacy of financial resources when considering new programmes or changes to existing programmes. Dr. Treslan stated that, while the Undergraduate Studies Committee is prepared to examine the academic aspect of such proposals, perhaps the question of financial resources should fall within the purview of the Committee on Academic Planning or the Advisory Committee on the Budget. He suggested that another possible solution would be to ask the heads of the academic units from which proposals originate to provide a detailed letter indicating that the financial resources have been considered.

Following a lengthy discussion, it was moved by Dean Kealey, seconded by Dr. Bear and carried that the Committee on Committees be asked to examine the matter and to propose an appropriate mechanism for considering resource implications when new programmes or changes to existing programmes are being proposed.

ITEMS FOR INFORMATION

67. The Executive Committee of Senate denied the following appeals

The Secretary of the Executive Committee reported that three student appeals (MUN NO.s 9561143, 9431057 and 8166084) were denied. Two undergraduate student appeals (MUN NO.s 9237250 and 9408089) were upheld.

68. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 5:30 p.m.












[MUN]"
Last Modified September 22, 1997 by Marion Gregory
mgregory@morgan.ucs.mun.ca