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Research under this theme relates to people and communities, environment and resources, approaches and technologies for sustainable resource development, and land, ocean and coastal zones in arctic and northern regions.

Key research areas include northern peoples and their languages, society, culture and communities; regional, national and international governance mechanisms such as environmental regulations and the Law of the Sea; distance education, telecommunications and learning technologies and their implications for northern peoples; technologies for and management of natural resource development, transportation, safety and survival, and health care and emergency response in harsh, remote locations; the geography and ecology of northern marine, terrestrial and ice environments; climate change and its impacts, significant resource developments, and assertion of Canadian sovereignty in the north; land claims, environmental assessment, transportation, and northern and remote infrastructure; economic and regulatory models and best practices to maximize benefits from resource developments.

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Physics professor renewed as Canada Research Chair

Dr. Lev Tarasov, an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, has been renewed as the Canada Research Chair in Glacial Dynamics Modelling.

As a tier two junior chair, Dr. Tarasov will receive $100,000 annually for five years for a total of $500,000. Tier two chairs, tenable for five years and renewable once, are for exceptional emerging researchers, acknowledged by their peers as having the potential to lead in their field.

Dr. Tarasov’s research involves inferring and understanding changes in the glacial system in which ice, climate and earth interact. See More...


A collaborative approach to food security in Labrador

Rachel Hirsch, the 2012 post-doctoral research fellow at the Labrador Institute, is learning something new every day from her co-workers in Nain.

“I try to approach new situations with my "eyes wide open" and to expect the unexpected … as I learn and meet new people I feel more connected to a place,” she said. “Everyone I have met – both in Goose Bay and Nain – has been more than somewhat extraordinary. My co-workers at the Nain Research Centre are some of the most dedicated, hard-working people I have ever met. I feel very blessed.

” Dr. Hirsch is focusing her efforts on helping to develop and evaluate a pilot youth outreach program in Nain through the Nain Research Centre and Community Freezer Program (CFP). See More...