New chair in child protection hopes to be...
A resource to the community

By Sharon Gray

 The new chair of child protection at Memorial says the protection of children goes beyond funding programs and resources and involves everyone in building healthy communities.
 Dr. Kenneth Barter, Social Work, brings 30 years of practical experience and education to his new job. Born and raised in Newfoundland, he finished an arts degree with a social work major at Memorial in 1971, followed by a master of social work at the University of Calgary in 1977, and a doctor of social work at Wilfred Laurier University in 1992. In the intervening years he worked in many parts of the country, including the Northwest Territories, in social services. He served as regional director of social services in P.E.I. from 1978-1995 and teaching for the past three years at Lakehead University.
 "For the past three years I've been involved in theoretical research in the whole area of child welfare, with a particular emphasis on child protection," said Dr. Barter. "Drawing on my years of experience in the field of child welfare, the focus of my theoretical research, publications and paper presentations is one of articulating the realities of practice as I experienced them, contextualizing these experiences based on the literature and research in child welfare, and combining both to formulate a conceptual framework that could conceivably guide practices in child protection work."
 Dr. Barter refers to this framework as one that places more responsibility on the community. "We need to build on the strengths of the community to reclaim children and families at risk."
 Part of that building process involves challenging the community about fundamental issues of poverty, discrimination, powerlessness, and lack of opportunity.
 "We have to approach child protection from a social justice framework -- we need a better and more equitable distribution of resources."
 Dr. Barter took up his new position as chair of child protection at the beginning of September, and he working on connecting to all sectors throughout the province concerned with child protection. His job involves research, teaching and community outreach.
 "I need to find out how I can be a resource to the community and organizations concerned with child protection so we can develop new and innovative ways of responding to the needs of children."The new chair of child protection at Memorial says the protection of children goes beyond funding programs and resources and involves everyone in building healthy communities.
 Dr. Kenneth Barter, Social Work, brings 30 years of practical experience and education to his new job. Born and raised in Newfoundland, he finished an arts degree with a social work major at Memorial in 1971, followed by a master of social work at the University of Calgary in 1977, and a doctor of social work at Wilfred Laurier University in 1992. In the intervening years he worked in many parts of the country, including the Northwest Territories, in social services. He served as regional director of social services in P.E.I. from 1978-1995 and teaching for the past three years at Lakehead University.
 "For the past three years I've been involved in theoretical research in the whole area of child welfare, with a particular emphasis on child protection," said Dr. Barter. "Drawing on my years of experience in the field of child welfare, the focus of my theoretical research, publications and paper presentations is one of articulating the realities of practice as I experienced them, contextualizing these experiences based on the literature and research in child welfare, and combining both to formulate a conceptual framework that could conceivably guide practices in child protection work."
 Dr. Barter refers to this framework as one that places more responsibility on the community. "We need to build on the strengths of the community to reclaim children and families at risk."
 Part of that building process involves challenging the community about fundamental issues of poverty, discrimination, powerlessness, and lack of opportunity.
 "We have to approach child protection from a social justice framework -- we need a better and more equitable distribution of resources."
 Dr. Barter took up his new position as chair of child protection at the beginning of September, and he working on connecting to all sectors throughout the province concerned with child protection. His job involves research, teaching and community outreach.
 "I need to find out how I can be a resource to the community and organizations concerned with child protection so we can develop new and innovative ways of responding to the needs of children."
 
 



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