Intersecting Journeys: the Anthropology of Pilgrimage and Tourism

Edited by Dr. Sharon Roseman, Department of Anthropology and Dr. Ellen Badone, McMaster University

Intersecting Journeys

Intersecting Journeys: the Anthropology of Pilgrimage and Tourism

Intersecting Journeys: the Anthropology of Pilgrimage and Tourism is a new collection of essays edited by Dr. Sharon Roseman, Department of Anthropology and Dr. Ellen Badone, McMaster University. Starting from the premise that religion, broadly defined, involves a quest for meaning, the book seeks to connect the concepts of pilgrimage as religious travel and tourism as secular journeying.

The appeal to visit sacred sites is bigger than ever according to the writers in this collection. Places such as Lourdes, Rome, Jerusalem and Santiago de Compostela still hold an appeal over the public. And unconventional sites such as Ground Zero and Star Trek conventions are gaining popularity too as more and more people search for a meaning that is larger than themselves.

Dr. Sharon Roseman

Dr. Sharon Roseman



This book is an ethnographic analysis of the significance of such sites, as well as the sense of community they inspire, which provides compelling evidence of the links between pilgrimage and tourism. Such studies stand at the forefront of postmodern debates about movement and centers, global flows, social identities and the negotiation of meanings.

Intersecting Journeys: the Anthropology of Pilgrimage and Tourism is published by University of Illinois Press, 2004. Featured in the book are essays by Memorial professors Mark Tate, Wayne Fife, Jennifer Porter and Sharon Roseman.