Cybercells: Learning in Actual and Virtual Groups

By Dr. Ken Stevens and Dr. David Stewart

Cybercells

Cybercells: Learning in Actual and Virtual Groups

This first edition text is written for those studying either primary or secondary education. This text adopts the idea that groups enable learning, challenge thinking and provide a process for individual meaning-making. Knowledge about groups and building on the emerging technologies of distance participation is the basis for demonstrating how schools and educators can expand learning opportunities. Essentially Cybercell is a face-to-face group who extends their discussion to include virtual visitors. Portfolios provide the evidence, which is shared during the discussion.

The authors are both known for their innovative concepts in the integration of physical and virtual learning environments. Ken Stevens is a professor in Memorial’s Faculty of Education. Dr. David Stewart is a faculty member at Massey University, New Zealand.

Cybercells

Dr. Ken Stevens

There is very little written on this subject and these authors are highly regarded in the field. New Zealand teachers are well acquainted with David Stewart’s Quality Learning Circles approach. Indeed, this is a well-established part of good practice in many New Zealand schools. Similarly, the digital portfolio is gaining an increasing following as a simple yet powerful tool for both reflective practice and the gathering of evidence of the thinking that goes on within the learning and teaching process. These approaches, along with the Visual Metaphor school development and progress mapping tool, are taken further within the cybercell context where their uses are well illustrated as approaches to develop meaningful learning conversations, gather and log evidence of learning progress, and assist with well-planned and well-executed long-term developments of a school’s physical and virtual learning environments.

Drs. Stevens and Stewart bring to bear their considerable knowledge of, and expertise in, what actually happens in classrooms and have come up with a very useful set of ideas and possible approaches for teachers and principals to consider.