ACoRN: Acute Care of at-Risk Newborns

Dr. Khalid Aziz, Editorial Group

ACoRN

ACoRN: Acute Care of at-Risk Newborns

This textbook for the Acute Care of at-Risk Newborns (ACoRN) was developed to provide health-care professionals with a step-by-step framework to guide the management of at-risk babies and their families. The ACoRN editorial board of 11 newborn health-care providers across the country includes Dr. Khalid Aziz, Discipline of Pediatrics.

Dr. Aziz said that few events are more challenging or stressful to a health professional than caring for a sick or preterm baby. “ACoRN was developed in response to the need for education in this area.”

This textbook is designed to help the practitioner gather and organize information, establish priorities and initiate interventions aimed at delivering a level of care that results in the best possible outcome. ACoRN provides a priority-based, clinically oriented framework for a process that sequentially integrates assessment, monitoring, diagnostic evaluation, intervention and on-going management for at-risk and unwell newborns.

Aziz

Dr. Khalid Aziz, Editorial Group

The ACoRN textbook is an integral part of the ACoRN program and each chapter is designed to illustrate the process of the program around one area of interest such as resuscitation, surgical conditions, fluid and glucose management and infection. “Learners should take a course in addition to reading this textbook,” said Dr. Aziz. “Like neonatal resuscitation, stabilization is most effective when performed by a coordinated team. Teamwork and an interdisciplinary approach are emphasized along with sharing of clinical scenarios.”

Dr. Aziz is a regional instructor for the Neonatal Resuscitation Program. The group at Memorial University, in collaboration with the Faculty of Engineering and the Provincial Perinatal Program, has been investigating the retention of skills after taking a neonatal resuscitation course using telehealth and simulation technologies. This study was supported by the Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research and the Janeway Foundation.